linux gone from grub - Redhat

This is a discussion on linux gone from grub - Redhat ; I have a dual-boot system (Fedora Core 1). rpm -q kernel was telling me I had two kernels installed, while the little circular warning applet in the toolbar was telling me I was booted into the inferior of the two ...

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  1. linux gone from grub

    I have a dual-boot system (Fedora Core 1). rpm -q kernel was telling me I had
    two kernels installed, while the little circular warning applet in the toolbar
    was telling me I was booted into the inferior of the two and should reboot.
    Well, of course I should have tried updating grub.conf with the newer kernel
    w/o deleting the old one, but instead I rpm -e'ed the old kernel. Now grub offers
    no linux option.

    Anyone know, w/o a boot disk (I have the Fedora installation CD, but not a boot CD),
    how to repair grub.conf?

    thanks,
    Dan


  2. Re: linux gone from grub

    On Thu, 13 May 2004 13:26:07 +0000, Dan Connelly wrote:

    > I have a dual-boot system (Fedora Core 1). rpm -q kernel was telling me
    > I had two kernels installed, while the little circular warning applet in
    > the toolbar was telling me I was booted into the inferior of the two and
    > should reboot. Well, of course I should have tried updating grub.conf
    > with the newer kernel w/o deleting the old one, but instead I rpm -e'ed
    > the old kernel. Now grub offers no linux option.
    >
    > Anyone know, w/o a boot disk (I have the Fedora installation CD, but not
    > a boot CD), how to repair grub.conf?


    Sure, boot with the Installation CD and type 'linux rescue' without the
    quotes at the menu screen. Answer a few questions and read the screens as
    they are displayed, the last will tell you how to use the 'chroot'
    command.

    Next locate the kernel(s) RPM files you want to use and type something
    like; rpm -ivh kernel*.rpm

    Hint: You might want to install the old kernel first (from the CD) then
    download and install the new kernel yourself.


    --
    "In short, without this exclusive franchise, called the Windows API,
    we would have been dead a long time ago." M$ Senior VP Bob Muglia '96

  3. Re: linux gone from grub

    Lenard wrote:
    > On Thu, 13 May 2004 13:26:07 +0000, Dan Connelly wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I have a dual-boot system (Fedora Core 1). rpm -q kernel was telling me
    >>I had two kernels installed, while the little circular warning applet in
    >>the toolbar was telling me I was booted into the inferior of the two and
    >>should reboot. Well, of course I should have tried updating grub.conf
    >>with the newer kernel w/o deleting the old one, but instead I rpm -e'ed
    >>the old kernel. Now grub offers no linux option.
    >>
    >>Anyone know, w/o a boot disk (I have the Fedora installation CD, but not
    >>a boot CD), how to repair grub.conf?

    >
    >
    > Sure, boot with the Installation CD and type 'linux rescue' without the
    > quotes at the menu screen. Answer a few questions and read the screens as
    > they are displayed, the last will tell you how to use the 'chroot'
    > command.
    >
    > Next locate the kernel(s) RPM files you want to use and type something
    > like; rpm -ivh kernel*.rpm
    >
    > Hint: You might want to install the old kernel first (from the CD) then
    > download and install the new kernel yourself.
    >
    >



    Thanks!

    It took a bit of work. There was already a kernel installed -- the problem was
    grubby, which "couldn't find a suitable template" so didn't include it
    in the config file. I eventually had to hand-edit
    /boot/grub/grub.conf with an appropriate Linux entry. When I figured out how
    to do that, it now boots again.

    Thanks again for the help....

    Dan


  4. Re: linux gone from grub

    On Thu, 13 May 2004 16:06:13 +0000, Dan Connelly wrote:

    > It took a bit of work. There was already a kernel installed -- the
    > problem was grubby, which "couldn't find a suitable template" so didn't
    > include it in the config file. I eventually had to hand-edit
    > /boot/grub/grub.conf with an appropriate Linux entry. When I figured
    > out how to do that, it now boots again.
    >
    > Thanks again for the help....


    Make a backup copy of the /boot/grub/grub.conf file just in case this
    happens again, as root type something like;

    cp /boot/grub/grub.conf /boot/grub/grub_backup.conf

    FYI: read 'man rpm' and pay special attention to the switch '--force'


    --
    "In short, without this exclusive franchise, called the Windows API,
    we would have been dead a long time ago." M$ Senior VP Bob Muglia '96

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