VNC - Redhat

This is a discussion on VNC - Redhat ; Hello, Has anyone successfully made RedHat 9 serve VNC? I did a clean install (again!) and selected the option to install the real VNC server. Install complete and under services tried to start the VNC server. The dialog box says ...

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Thread: VNC

  1. VNC

    Hello,
    Has anyone successfully made RedHat 9 serve VNC?

    I did a clean install (again!) and selected the option to install the real
    VNC server. Install complete and under services tried to start the VNC
    server. The dialog box says it started but the status does not change from
    stopped.
    And, I cannot connect to it with my VNC client.

    Any suggestions?

    thanks in advance.



  2. Re: VNC

    On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 10:20:21 -0500, Brian LaBorde wrote:

    > Hello,
    > Has anyone successfully made RedHat 9 serve VNC?
    >
    > I did a clean install (again!) and selected the option to install the
    > real VNC server. Install complete and under services tried to start the
    > VNC server. The dialog box says it started but the status does not
    > change from stopped.
    > And, I cannot connect to it with my VNC client.
    >
    > Any suggestions?


    Read the tutorial found here;
    http://fedoranews.org/tchung/vnc/index.shtml


    --
    "In short, without this exclusive franchise, called the Windows API,
    we would have been dead a long time ago." M$ Senior VP Bob Muglia '96

  3. Re: VNC

    Thanks,
    Great tutorial! followed every word... but. problem.

    everything starts and goes to plan in your tutorial.

    but my VNC client still says...
    "Failed to connect to server"

    any other ideas?

    "Lenard" wrote in message
    newsan.2004.04.25.15.45.16.738760@127.0.0.1...
    > On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 10:20:21 -0500, Brian LaBorde wrote:
    >
    > > Hello,
    > > Has anyone successfully made RedHat 9 serve VNC?
    > >
    > > I did a clean install (again!) and selected the option to install the
    > > real VNC server. Install complete and under services tried to start the
    > > VNC server. The dialog box says it started but the status does not
    > > change from stopped.
    > > And, I cannot connect to it with my VNC client.
    > >
    > > Any suggestions?

    >
    > Read the tutorial found here;
    > http://fedoranews.org/tchung/vnc/index.shtml
    >
    >
    > --
    > "In short, without this exclusive franchise, called the Windows API,
    > we would have been dead a long time ago." M$ Senior VP Bob Muglia '96




  4. Re: VNC

    On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 17:16:24 -0500, Brian LaBorde wrote:

    > Thanks,
    > Great tutorial! followed every word... but. problem.
    >
    > everything starts and goes to plan in your tutorial.
    >
    > but my VNC client still says...
    > "Failed to connect to server"
    >
    > any other ideas?


    http://www.realvnc.com/documentation.html

    http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/VNC.html


    --
    "In short, without this exclusive franchise, called the Windows API,
    we would have been dead a long time ago." M$ Senior VP Bob Muglia '96

  5. Re: VNC

    On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 at 5:16pm, Brian LaBorde scribbled:

    > Thanks,
    > Great tutorial! followed every word... but. problem.
    >
    > everything starts and goes to plan in your tutorial.
    >
    > but my VNC client still says...
    > "Failed to connect to server"
    >
    > any other ideas?


    It should be no problem to serve VNC from RH 9. I do it all the time.

    You did a "service vncserver status" (as root) and it says:
    "Xvnc Running..."? It should.

    You can also do a 'ps -ef' and grep for 'Xvnc' to find out the same info.
    That process had better be there.

    Forget connecting from a client, for now. Log into the box running Xvnc
    (your vnc server) and simply telnet to port 5901 on localhost. Does it
    connect with the message:

    Connected to localhost.localdomain (127.0.0.1).
    Escape character is '^]'.
    RFB 003.007

    Or something similar? If so, GOOD. If not, you're not ready to connect
    from a client . That is, you're already in trouble if it says "connection
    refused." This is assuming you're using the VNC console environment, of
    localhost:1. If you start your server on localhost:0, 2, or whatever, you
    have to look at port 590x accordingly.

    In other words, find out if you can connect from the host machine TO the
    host machine, via the VNC port. Then you can start worrying about whether
    you can get there from a client on another machine. Neall

  6. Re: VNC... oh yeah

    By the way,

    If you KNOW the vncserver process is running, and you have no clue what
    port it's bound to, you can run "lsof | grep Xvnc" as root. Look for the
    entry similar to:

    Xvnc 2049 username 3u IPv4 14044 TCP *:5901 (LISTEN)

    In this case, obviously it's bound to 5901.
    Ignore the one that says 6001 (xdm/x11 port).

    In general, you can use lsof to see all processes bound to all ports.
    Very handy if you have users running socket-based programs (muds, talkers,
    moos) and you want to bust them red-handed

    Also, lsof can tell you what programs have what files open. Handy if you
    need to unmount a partition and it says "busy." The lsof command can tell
    you which process to kill so you can unmount it. Neall

  7. Re: VNC... oh yeah

    Linux Doctor wrote in message news:...
    > By the way,
    >
    > If you KNOW the vncserver process is running, and you have no clue what
    > port it's bound to, you can run "lsof | grep Xvnc" as root. Look for the
    > entry similar to:
    >
    > Xvnc 2049 username 3u IPv4 14044 TCP *:5901 (LISTEN)
    >
    > In this case, obviously it's bound to 5901.
    > Ignore the one that says 6001 (xdm/x11 port).
    >
    > In general, you can use lsof to see all processes bound to all ports.
    > Very handy if you have users running socket-based programs (muds, talkers,
    > moos) and you want to bust them red-handed
    >
    > Also, lsof can tell you what programs have what files open. Handy if you
    > need to unmount a partition and it says "busy." The lsof command can tell
    > you which process to kill so you can unmount it. Neall


    Better still, lsof has many filtering options that make use
    of grep unnecessary. Neall's opening example, looking for
    open Xvnc socket files, can be written as:

    $ lsof -c Xvnc -a -i

    That tells lsof to look for processes whose command is named
    Xvnc ("-c Xvnc") and ("-a") whose open files are Internet socket
    files ("-i"). Those options are described in the lsof man page.

    Additional lsof documentation is available in the open-source
    lsof distribution, which may be found at:

    ftp://lsof.itap.purdue.edu/pub/tools/unix/lsof

    Among its many 00* documentation files is 00QUICKSTART. It has
    helpful introductory information and examples for those new to
    lsof's sea of options. Another useful 00* documentation file
    is the lsof FAQ, in file 00FAQ.

    Vic Abell, lsof author

  8. Re: VNC... oh yeah

    On Mon, 26 Apr 2004 at 5:08am, Vic Abell scribbled:

    > Better still, lsof has many filtering options that make use
    > of grep unnecessary. Neall's opening example, looking for
    > open Xvnc socket files, can be written as:
    >
    > $ lsof -c Xvnc -a -i
    >
    > That tells lsof to look for processes whose command is named
    > Xvnc ("-c Xvnc") and ("-a") whose open files are Internet socket
    > files ("-i"). Those options are described in the lsof man page.


    Who better to point the way then the AUTHOR of lsof? Thanks, Vic. I
    think it's safe to say that lsof is one of the most powerful, yet
    underused utilties available today for linux. Neall

    > ftp://lsof.itap.purdue.edu/pub/tools/unix/lsof



  9. Re: VNC... oh yeah

    Thanks everyone!
    You all were great help... BUT it was my newbie stautus that killed me...

    Get this. I had everything perfect... but when trying to connect I connected
    to:
    192.168.254.2
    instead of
    192.168.254.2:5901

    Yes folks... it was that simple!

    One problem down... 5 to go!

    thanks again, and remember, the devil is in the details!



    "Linux Doctor" wrote in message
    news:Pine.LNX.4.58.0404261116260.5616@unhtugznvy.p bz...
    > On Mon, 26 Apr 2004 at 5:08am, Vic Abell scribbled:
    >
    > > Better still, lsof has many filtering options that make use
    > > of grep unnecessary. Neall's opening example, looking for
    > > open Xvnc socket files, can be written as:
    > >
    > > $ lsof -c Xvnc -a -i
    > >
    > > That tells lsof to look for processes whose command is named
    > > Xvnc ("-c Xvnc") and ("-a") whose open files are Internet socket
    > > files ("-i"). Those options are described in the lsof man page.

    >
    > Who better to point the way then the AUTHOR of lsof? Thanks, Vic. I
    > think it's safe to say that lsof is one of the most powerful, yet
    > underused utilties available today for linux. Neall
    >
    > > ftp://lsof.itap.purdue.edu/pub/tools/unix/lsof

    >




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