Whereis NTP (client) config file in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3. - Redhat

This is a discussion on Whereis NTP (client) config file in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3. - Redhat ; If you right click on the clock applet on the GNOME panel, one of the options is "Adjust Date and Time..." If you select that, enter the root password, you can select "Enable Network Time Protocol". If you check that ...

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Thread: Whereis NTP (client) config file in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3.

  1. Whereis NTP (client) config file in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3.

    If you right click on the clock applet on the GNOME panel, one of the
    options is "Adjust Date and Time..." If you select that, enter the root
    password, you can select "Enable Network Time Protocol". If you check that
    box, you get a list of NTP time servers (two are 66.187.224.4 and
    66.187.233.4, which are Red Hat. Two are clock.redhat.com and
    clock2.redhat.com, which have the same IP addresses as the first two).

    Right now I am on dial-up and this does not work very well, but I will be
    getting a broadband (15 Megabit/sec Verizon FiOS) in a few days and I
    thought it would be nice to enable this instead of running _rdate_ as I do
    now. But reading about NTP, it suggests using three to five NTP servers, and
    I have a list of available level 2 servers near me. But it seems this allows
    me to use only one.

    Is there any easy way to diddle a config file somewhere (where?) to add
    entries to this list, and to tell whatever program uses this (which one?) to
    use them all?

    --
    .~. Jean-David Beyer Registered Linux User 85642.
    /V\ PGP-Key: 9A2FC99A Registered Machine 241939.
    /( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey http://counter.li.org
    ^^-^^ 07:15:00 up 18 days, 22:02, 4 users, load average: 4.25, 4.26, 4.16

  2. Re: Whereis NTP (client) config file in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3.

    Jean-David Beyer wrote:

    > If you right click on the clock applet on the GNOME panel, one of the
    > options is "Adjust Date and Time..." If you select that, enter the root
    > password, you can select "Enable Network Time Protocol". If you check that
    > box, you get a list of NTP time servers (two are 66.187.224.4 and
    > 66.187.233.4, which are Red Hat. Two are clock.redhat.com and
    > clock2.redhat.com, which have the same IP addresses as the first two).
    >
    > Right now I am on dial-up and this does not work very well, but I will be
    > getting a broadband (15 Megabit/sec Verizon FiOS) in a few days and I
    > thought it would be nice to enable this instead of running _rdate_ as I do
    > now. But reading about NTP, it suggests using three to five NTP servers,
    > and I have a list of available level 2 servers near me. But it seems this
    > allows me to use only one.
    >
    > Is there any easy way to diddle a config file somewhere (where?) to add
    > entries to this list, and to tell whatever program uses this (which one?)
    > to use them all?


    The file is; /etc/ntp.conf

    And recent changes (google on pool.ntp.org) make this really easy to
    configure, sample file below;

    # Permit time synchronization with our time source, but do not
    # permit the source to query or modify the service on this system.

    restrict default nomodify notrap noquery

    # Permit all access over the loopback interface. This could
    # be tightened as well, but to do so would effect some of
    # the administrative functions.
    restrict 127.0.0.1


    # -- CLIENT NETWORK -------
    # Permit systems on this network to synchronize with this
    # time service. Do not permit those systems to modify the
    # configuration of this service. Also, do not use those
    # systems as peers for synchronization.
    # restrict 192.168.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0 nomodify notrap


    # --- OUR TIMESERVERS -----
    server 0.pool.ntp.org
    server 1.pool.ntp.org
    server 2.pool.ntp.org


    # --- NTP MULTICASTCLIENT ---
    #multicastclient # listen on default 224.0.1.1
    # restrict 224.0.1.1 mask 255.255.255.255 nomodify notrap
    # restrict 192.168.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0 nomodify notrap



    # --- GENERAL CONFIGURATION ---
    #
    # Undisciplined Local Clock. This is a fake driver intended for backup
    # and when no outside source of synchronized time is available. The
    # default stratum is usually 3, but in this case we elect to use stratum
    # 0. Since the server line does not have the prefer keyword, this driver
    # is never used for synchronization, unless no other other
    # synchronization source is available. In case the local host is
    # controlled by some external source, such as an external oscillator or
    # another protocol, the prefer keyword would cause the local host to
    # disregard all other synchronization sources, unless the kernel
    # modifications are in use and declare an unsynchronized condition.
    #
    server 127.127.1.0 # local clock
    fudge 127.127.1.0 stratum 10

    #
    # Drift file. Put this in a directory which the daemon can write to.
    # No symbolic links allowed, either, since the daemon updates the file
    # by creating a temporary in the same directory and then rename()'ing
    # it to the file.
    #
    driftfile /var/lib/ntp/drift
    broadcastdelay 0.008

    #
    # Keys file. If you want to diddle your server at run time, make a
    # keys file (mode 600 for sure) and define the key number to be
    # used for making requests.
    #
    # PLEASE DO NOT USE THE DEFAULT VALUES HERE. Pick your own, or remote
    # systems might be able to reset your clock at will. Note also that
    # ntpd is started with a -A flag, disabling authentication, that
    # will have to be removed as well.
    #
    keys /etc/ntp/keys

    --
    "A personal computer is called a personal computer because it's yours,
    Anything that runs on that computer, you should have control over."
    Andrew Moss, Microsoft's senior director of technical policy, 2005

  3. Re: Whereis NTP (client) config file in Red Hat Enterprise Linux3.

    Lenard wrote (in part):
    > Jean-David Beyer wrote (in part):
    >
    >> Right now I am on dial-up and this does not work very well, but I will be
    >> getting a broadband (15 Megabit/sec Verizon FiOS) in a few days and I
    >> thought it would be nice to enable this instead of running _rdate_ as I do
    >> now. But reading about NTP, it suggests using three to five NTP servers,
    >> and I have a list of available level 2 servers near me. But it seems this
    >> allows me to use only one.
    >>

    >
    > The file is; /etc/ntp.conf


    Thank you. I did not know that the client and server are actually the same.
    >
    > And recent changes (google on pool.ntp.org) make this really easy to
    > configure, sample file below;
    >

    [snip]

    OK. I got that done a day or two ago. They set up FiOS 15Mbps down, 2Mbps
    up, and it is really fast. Wow. The delays are now much smaller than before
    I just restarted it a little while ago, and it already looks like this.


    Thu Jan 19 15:19:59 EST 2006
    -rw-r--r-- 1 ntp ntp 8 Jan 19 07:13 drift
    -55.369
    remote refid st t when poll reach delay offset jitter
    ================================================== ============================
    clock2.redhat.c .CDMA. 1 u 62 64 1 49.891 -0.271 0.004
    msb.significant ns.exnet.com 3 u 5 64 3 13.813 -0.070 0.206
    ns2.medbanner.c time.nist.gov 2 u 1 64 3 59.025 -2.192 2.388
    Thu Jan 19 15:35:00 EST 2006
    -rw-r--r-- 1 ntp ntp 8 Jan 19 07:13 drift
    -55.369
    remote refid st t when poll reach delay offset jitter
    ================================================== ============================
    *clock2.redhat.c .CDMA. 1 u 7 128 377 50.197 1.651 0.169
    +msb.significant rosehip.exnet.c 3 u 67 128 377 17.291 3.085 0.112
    +ns2.medbanner.c time.nist.gov 2 u 66 128 377 59.633 -3.478 0.972

    --
    .~. Jean-David Beyer Registered Linux User 85642.
    /V\ PGP-Key: 9A2FC99A Registered Machine 241939.
    /( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey http://counter.li.org
    ^^-^^ 15:35:00 up 21 days, 6:22, 4 users, load average: 4.29, 4.31, 4.27

  4. Re: Whereis NTP (client) config file in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3.

    Jean-David Beyer wrote:



    >> The file is; /etc/ntp.conf

    >
    > Thank you. I did not know that the client and server are actually the
    > same.


    Your welcome....



    > OK. I got that done a day or two ago. They set up FiOS 15Mbps down, 2Mbps
    > up, and it is really fast. Wow. The delays are now much smaller than
    > before I just restarted it a little while ago, and it already looks like
    > this.


    Yea, I think I can live with a maximum 0.260793 sec drift in 24 hours.


    --
    "A personal computer is called a personal computer because it's yours,
    Anything that runs on that computer, you should have control over."
    Andrew Moss, Microsoft's senior director of technical policy, 2005

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