Dual Boot - Redhat

This is a discussion on Dual Boot - Redhat ; I am new to the world of Linux. I have loaded SuSe on a computer. It works well. I accepted the default partitioning suggestions. Now I want to explore Fedora 4. I only have one system available to me. I ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Dual Boot

  1. Dual Boot

    I am new to the world of Linux. I have loaded SuSe on a computer. It works
    well. I accepted the default partitioning suggestions. Now I want to
    explore Fedora 4. I only have one system available to me. I would like to
    try a dual boot system leaving SuSe and adding Fedora 4. The books I have
    found talk about GRUB but not in detail. What is the process I need to
    follow in order to make this work the way I would like? If I start the
    Fedora instalation will it lead me through GRUB? Please advise.

  2. Re: Dual Boot

    On Sat, 14 Jan 2006 21:09:26 -0500, Ed Lindquist wrote:

    > I am new to the world of Linux. I have loaded SuSe on a computer. It works
    > well. I accepted the default partitioning suggestions. Now I want to
    > explore Fedora 4. I only have one system available to me. I would like to
    > try a dual boot system leaving SuSe and adding Fedora 4. The books I have
    > found talk about GRUB but not in detail. What is the process I need to
    > follow in order to make this work the way I would like? If I start the
    > Fedora instalation will it lead me through GRUB? Please advise.


    You need a separate partition for Fedora, if you don't have one you'll
    have to create one by either resizing an existing partition and then
    creating a new one or by deleting the existing partition and then
    creating a new one for FC and one for whatever you had in the old
    partition. You can use the same /home and swap for FC, the only partition
    that needs to be unique is /. Also you can mount the SUSE / partition
    under FC4 so that you can use it to copy any configuration files that
    you've modified, I'd call the mount point /suse if I were you.

    If you have a spare partition then creating a
    dual boot is easy. When you install FC make sure that you select the
    advanced options when installing the boot loader and then have it install
    it's boot loader to the root partition instead of to the MBR (SUSE is
    already using the MBR). After you've done your install then you need to
    edit /etc/grub.conf on the primary OS, which in your case is SUSE. You
    need to add a chanin load to the FC4 boot loader which will look like this,

    title FC4
    rootnoverify (hd0,7)
    chainloader +1

    In the above example the root of FC4 is on /dev/sda8. GRUB calls /dev/hda
    or /dev/sda (depending on if it's a parallel ATA or Serial ATA disk), hd0.
    It calls partition 1, 0 so you'll have to subtract 1 from the partition
    number of the FC4 / partition.

  3. Re: Dual Boot

    If you have the room you could install another hard drive [prices are quite
    low now] and install Fedora on it. Set that drive as the master and let
    Fedora put Grub on its MBR. Then after the installation is done you can edit
    grub.conf to add a stanza for your SuSe on the slave drive.

    It's also a low risk method -- it anything goes wrong you can just reconnect
    the SuSe drive as the master.

    Dr. G.


    In article , Ed Lindquist
    wrote:
    >I am new to the world of Linux. I have loaded SuSe on a computer. It works
    >well. I accepted the default partitioning suggestions. Now I want to
    >explore Fedora 4. I only have one system available to me. I would like to
    >try a dual boot system leaving SuSe and adding Fedora 4. The books I have
    >found talk about GRUB but not in detail. What is the process I need to
    >follow in order to make this work the way I would like? If I start the
    >Fedora instalation will it lead me through GRUB? Please advise.


  4. Re: Dual Boot

    General Schvantzkoph wrote:

    > On Sat, 14 Jan 2006 21:09:26 -0500, Ed Lindquist wrote:
    >
    >> I am new to the world of Linux. I have loaded SuSe on a computer. It
    >> works
    >> well. I accepted the default partitioning suggestions. Now I want to
    >> explore Fedora 4. I only have one system available to me. I would like
    >> to
    >> try a dual boot system leaving SuSe and adding Fedora 4. The books I
    >> have
    >> found talk about GRUB but not in detail. What is the process I need to
    >> follow in order to make this work the way I would like? If I start the
    >> Fedora instalation will it lead me through GRUB? Please advise.

    >
    > You need a separate partition for Fedora, if you don't have one you'll
    > have to create one by either resizing an existing partition and then
    > creating a new one or by deleting the existing partition and then
    > creating a new one for FC and one for whatever you had in the old
    > partition. You can use the same /home and swap for FC, the only partition
    > that needs to be unique is /. Also you can mount the SUSE / partition
    > under FC4 so that you can use it to copy any configuration files that
    > you've modified, I'd call the mount point /suse if I were you.
    >
    > If you have a spare partition then creating a
    > dual boot is easy. When you install FC make sure that you select the
    > advanced options when installing the boot loader and then have it install
    > it's boot loader to the root partition instead of to the MBR (SUSE is
    > already using the MBR). After you've done your install then you need to
    > edit /etc/grub.conf on the primary OS, which in your case is SUSE. You
    > need to add a chanin load to the FC4 boot loader which will look like
    > this,
    >
    > title FC4
    > rootnoverify (hd0,7)
    > chainloader +1
    >
    > In the above example the root of FC4 is on /dev/sda8. GRUB calls /dev/hda
    > or /dev/sda (depending on if it's a parallel ATA or Serial ATA disk), hd0.
    > It calls partition 1, 0 so you'll have to subtract 1 from the partition
    > number of the FC4 / partition.



    At this point how could I repartition the drive? It is 120GB and SuSe is
    only using 4 GB (if that). The computer only has room for one drive
    otherwise I would use a separate drive. It is a pain to swap drives in
    this case. I have gotten used to SuSe and like it. How do I "run GRUB"?
    It must be on this system because I say it updated recently. In
    the/etc/grub.conf
    linux:/etc # more grub.conf
    setup --stage2=/boot/grub/stage2 (hd0,1) (hd0,1)
    setup --stage2=/boot/grub/stage2 (hd0) (hd0,1)
    quit
    what would it look like with the changes suggested?

    Thank you for the advice.

  5. Re: Dual Boot

    On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 15:49:49 -0500, Ed Lindquist wrote:

    > General Schvantzkoph wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 14 Jan 2006 21:09:26 -0500, Ed Lindquist wrote:
    >>
    >>> I am new to the world of Linux. I have loaded SuSe on a computer. It
    >>> works
    >>> well. I accepted the default partitioning suggestions. Now I want to
    >>> explore Fedora 4. I only have one system available to me. I would like
    >>> to
    >>> try a dual boot system leaving SuSe and adding Fedora 4. The books I
    >>> have
    >>> found talk about GRUB but not in detail. What is the process I need to
    >>> follow in order to make this work the way I would like? If I start the
    >>> Fedora instalation will it lead me through GRUB? Please advise.

    >>
    >> You need a separate partition for Fedora, if you don't have one you'll
    >> have to create one by either resizing an existing partition and then
    >> creating a new one or by deleting the existing partition and then
    >> creating a new one for FC and one for whatever you had in the old
    >> partition. You can use the same /home and swap for FC, the only partition
    >> that needs to be unique is /. Also you can mount the SUSE / partition
    >> under FC4 so that you can use it to copy any configuration files that
    >> you've modified, I'd call the mount point /suse if I were you.
    >>
    >> If you have a spare partition then creating a
    >> dual boot is easy. When you install FC make sure that you select the
    >> advanced options when installing the boot loader and then have it install
    >> it's boot loader to the root partition instead of to the MBR (SUSE is
    >> already using the MBR). After you've done your install then you need to
    >> edit /etc/grub.conf on the primary OS, which in your case is SUSE. You
    >> need to add a chanin load to the FC4 boot loader which will look like
    >> this,
    >>
    >> title FC4
    >> rootnoverify (hd0,7)
    >> chainloader +1
    >>
    >> In the above example the root of FC4 is on /dev/sda8. GRUB calls /dev/hda
    >> or /dev/sda (depending on if it's a parallel ATA or Serial ATA disk), hd0.
    >> It calls partition 1, 0 so you'll have to subtract 1 from the partition
    >> number of the FC4 / partition.

    >
    >
    > At this point how could I repartition the drive? It is 120GB and SuSe is
    > only using 4 GB (if that). The computer only has room for one drive
    > otherwise I would use a separate drive. It is a pain to swap drives in
    > this case. I have gotten used to SuSe and like it. How do I "run GRUB"?
    > It must be on this system because I say it updated recently. In
    > the/etc/grub.conf
    > linux:/etc # more grub.conf
    > setup --stage2=/boot/grub/stage2 (hd0,1) (hd0,1)
    > setup --stage2=/boot/grub/stage2 (hd0) (hd0,1)
    > quit
    > what would it look like with the changes suggested?
    >
    > Thank you for the advice.


    How is the drive partitioned now? 120G is enough for a multiboot machine.
    My laptop has a 100G drive and it's set up to triple boot. Just by way of
    example my laptop is partitioned as follows,

    NTFS for WinXP 20G
    / (for FC4) 8G
    /fc3 (/ for FC3) 8G
    /home (shared) 60G
    swap 2G (shared)

    I don't know what tools are on the SUSE install disk (I've never used
    SUSE) but the Mandriva Install disk has a partition resizer on it that can
    resize both Linux and Windows partitions. The Fedora installer disk tool
    lacks resize capability so you'll have to use Mandriva's or SUSE (assuming
    that SUSE can do it). What you should do is download the first CD of the
    Mandriva installer. Start the install and go into the disk tool and create
    the partitions that you need. After you've shrunk your old partitions and
    created the new ones you can abort the Mandriva install and do a Fedora
    install. If you have XP on your system you should first run the disk
    optimizer to defrag and pack the NTFS partition, this will make it easier
    to shrink it.





+ Reply to Thread