Install partitioning problem - Redhat

This is a discussion on Install partitioning problem - Redhat ; trying to install whitehat 4 respin 1 on a x86 PC because I don't really understand linux partitioning I choose "automatically partition" and then "keep all partitions and use existing free space" BUT when I click next I get an ...

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Thread: Install partitioning problem

  1. Install partitioning problem

    trying to install whitehat 4 respin 1 on a x86 PC

    because I don't really understand linux partitioning I choose "automatically
    partition" and then "keep all partitions and use existing free space" BUT
    when I click next I get an error saying "could not allocate requested
    partitions......." click ok and it says I haven't created a root
    partition! - of course I haven't, that's what "automatic" means doesn't it?

    any ideas?

    harry



  2. Re: Install partitioning problem


    "harry" wrote in message
    news:EwOnh.26431$k74.2579@text.news.blueyonder.co. uk...
    > trying to install whitehat 4 respin 1 on a x86 PC
    >
    > because I don't really understand linux partitioning I choose
    > "automatically
    > partition" and then "keep all partitions and use existing free space" BUT
    > when I click next I get an error saying "could not allocate requested
    > partitions......." click ok and it says I haven't created a root
    > partition! - of course I haven't, that's what "automatic" means doesn't
    > it?
    >



    What is happening is that linux has attempted to create the linux file
    systems / partitions in the available free partition and has found that
    there is not enough available disk space for the root partition to do the
    install and has bailed out of the installation without creating any of the
    partitions and has left the HDD with it's original partitioning setup.

    You haven't said what the current partitioning setup is on the HDD.
    A simple and common type of partitioning setup that is used on linux
    workstations is
    / ( root )
    /boot
    swap

    It is always better to manually set up the partitions when doing an install
    , and the way most people do it is to create the /boot partition first ( 100
    Mb ) , then the swap partition ( double the size of your Ram , usually 512
    Mb ) and the balance of the HDD is allocated to "/ " (root) partition and
    file system.

    The type of file systems used for each partition is :
    /boot ...........Ext3
    / .............Ext3
    swap..............swap

    There are other types of partitioning setups for linux , particularly for
    critical server environments , but the workstation type of partitioning is
    adequate for most home machines.

    If you already have an OS on part of the HDD and you want to create a dual
    boot setup , then you create the above workstation type setup in the
    extended partition.




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