Configure DSL and Linux network - Redhat

This is a discussion on Configure DSL and Linux network - Redhat ; Dear Experts, I have 2 XP/Linux dual boot machines. Previously, these machines were connected with a crossover cable, and they could talk to each other. But now, there is a DSL modem, and router that is not configured right. I ...

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Thread: Configure DSL and Linux network

  1. Configure DSL and Linux network

    Dear Experts,

    I have 2 XP/Linux dual boot machines.

    Previously, these machines were connected with a
    crossover cable, and they could talk to each other.
    But now, there is a DSL modem, and router that
    is not configured right.

    I have installed DSL on the XP side, and it is working well.
    Now, I'm trying to get it to work on Linux. First and
    foremost, I need the two Linux machines to talk to each
    other, through the router. Internet is secondary.

    So far, I can't even ping the modem, or router, so
    some fundamental configuration is needed.


    Hardware:
    The IP addresses are what is configured on the XP side.

    2 XP/Linux dual boot machines
    192.168.2.2 - white
    192.168.2.3 - red


    (Westell) DSL modem with Verizon
    192.168.1.1


    Belkin Wireless G router
    192.168.2.1
    also
    192.168.1.47


    Linux: Redhat 3.2
    Kernel: 2.4.21-27.0.2.ELorafw1


    I want the private network to be called:
    testrac.com


    The IP addresses need to be static.


    --------------------------

    Here is some analysis.

    [root@red notes]# ping 192.168.1.1
    connect: Network is unreachable

    [root@red notes]# ping 192.168.1.47
    connect: Network is unreachable

    Fortunately, the machine can ping itself.


    cat /etc/hosts
    # Do not remove the following line, or various programs
    # that require network functionality will fail.
    192.168.2.3 red.testrac.com red
    192.168.2.2 white.testrac.com white
    127.0.0.1 localhost.localdomain localhost


    route -n
    Kernel IP routing table
    Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use
    Iface
    192.168.2.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0
    eth0
    169.254.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.0.0 U 0 0 0
    eth0
    127.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 U 0 0 0
    lo


    cat /etc/sysconfig/network
    NETWORKING=yes
    HOSTNAME=red.testrac.com


    ifconfig -a
    eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:07:E9:3C:E3:24
    inet addr:192.168.2.3 Bcast:192.168.2.255
    Mask:255.255.255.0
    UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    RX packets:917 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    TX packets:743 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    RX bytes:189781 (185.3 Kb) TX bytes:53423 (52.1 Kb)
    Interrupt:10 Base address:0xdf40 Memory:fcffb000-fcffb038

    lo Link encap:Local Loopback
    inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0
    UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1
    RX packets:16505 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    TX packets:16505 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
    RX bytes:1750236 (1.6 Mb) TX bytes:1750236 (1.6 Mb)


    cat /etc/resolv.conf
    search testrac.com

    cat /etc/dhcpd.conf
    cat: /etc/dhcpd.conf: No such file or directory


    route add default gw 192.168.1.1

    SIOCADDRT: Network is unreachable


    --------------------------


    I've been looking for a good how-to on the web, but
    can't find anything concise. If you know of some
    good concise web pages, please refer me to them.

    Or, if you know what I need to do, please let
    me know.


    Thanks!


  2. Re: Configure DSL and Linux network

    On 16 Jun 2005 19:32:04 -0700, linuxquestion@yahoo.com wrote:

    > cat /etc/hosts
    > # Do not remove the following line, or various programs
    > # that require network functionality will fail.
    > 192.168.2.3 red.testrac.com red
    > 192.168.2.2 white.testrac.com white
    > 127.0.0.1 localhost.localdomain localhost
    >


    looks ok

    >
    > route -n
    > Kernel IP routing table
    > Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use
    > Iface
    > 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0
    > eth0
    > 169.254.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.0.0 U 0 0 0
    > eth0
    > 127.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 U 0 0 0
    > lo



    No gateway set here, that is bad. See the G in my example.
    $ route -n
    Kernel IP routing table
    Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use Iface
    192.168.2.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 10 0 0 eth0
    0.0.0.0 192.168.2.1 0.0.0.0 UG 10 0 0 eth0

    >
    >
    > cat /etc/sysconfig/network
    > NETWORKING=yes
    > HOSTNAME=red.testrac.com


    I set GATEWAY and GATEWAYDEV in my Mandrake linux. No idea what you
    need since you failed to provide which linux distro you are running.

    >
    >
    > ifconfig -a
    > eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:07:E9:3C:E3:24
    > inet addr:192.168.2.3 Bcast:192.168.2.255


    Hey, link is up, that is good.

    > cat /etc/resolv.conf
    > search testrac.com


    That is sad, you need at lease one nameserver line with an ip address.
    Example:
    $ cat /etc/resolv.conf
    nameserver 63.240.276.198
    nameserver 204.127.99.8


    > cat /etc/dhcpd.conf
    > cat: /etc/dhcpd.conf: No such file or directory


    do not need one if static values are used because you are behind a router.

    > route add default gw 192.168.1.1


    Hmmm, I would use a straigh throug cable between dsl router and pc
    to get everything running, then I would hook in the wireless.


  3. Re: Configure DSL and Linux network

    On Thu, 16 Jun 2005 19:32:04 -0700, linuxquestion wrote:

    > Dear Experts,
    >
    > I have 2 XP/Linux dual boot machines.
    >
    > Previously, these machines were connected with a
    > crossover cable, and they could talk to each other.
    > But now, there is a DSL modem, and router that
    > is not configured right.
    >
    > I have installed DSL on the XP side, and it is working well.
    > Now, I'm trying to get it to work on Linux. First and
    > foremost, I need the two Linux machines to talk to each
    > other, through the router. Internet is secondary.
    >
    > So far, I can't even ping the modem, or router, so
    > some fundamental configuration is needed.
    >
    >
    > Hardware:
    > The IP addresses are what is configured on the XP side.
    >
    > 2 XP/Linux dual boot machines
    > 192.168.2.2 - white
    > 192.168.2.3 - red
    >
    >
    > (Westell) DSL modem with Verizon
    > 192.168.1.1
    >
    >
    > Belkin Wireless G router
    > 192.168.2.1
    > also
    > 192.168.1.47
    >
    >
    > Linux: Redhat 3.2
    > Kernel: 2.4.21-27.0.2.ELorafw1
    >
    >
    > I want the private network to be called:
    > testrac.com
    >
    >
    > The IP addresses need to be static.
    >
    >
    > --------------------------
    >
    > Here is some analysis.
    >
    > [root@red notes]# ping 192.168.1.1
    > connect: Network is unreachable
    >
    > [root@red notes]# ping 192.168.1.47
    > connect: Network is unreachable
    >
    > Fortunately, the machine can ping itself.
    >
    >
    > cat /etc/hosts
    > # Do not remove the following line, or various programs
    > # that require network functionality will fail.
    > 192.168.2.3 red.testrac.com red
    > 192.168.2.2 white.testrac.com white
    > 127.0.0.1 localhost.localdomain localhost
    >
    >
    > route -n
    > Kernel IP routing table
    > Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use
    > Iface
    > 192.168.2.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0
    > eth0
    > 169.254.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.0.0 U 0 0 0
    > eth0
    > 127.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 U 0 0 0
    > lo
    >
    >
    > cat /etc/sysconfig/network
    > NETWORKING=yes
    > HOSTNAME=red.testrac.com
    >
    >
    > ifconfig -a
    > eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:07:E9:3C:E3:24
    > inet addr:192.168.2.3 Bcast:192.168.2.255
    > Mask:255.255.255.0
    > UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    > RX packets:917 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    > TX packets:743 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    > collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    > RX bytes:189781 (185.3 Kb) TX bytes:53423 (52.1 Kb)
    > Interrupt:10 Base address:0xdf40 Memory:fcffb000-fcffb038
    >
    > lo Link encap:Local Loopback
    > inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0
    > UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1
    > RX packets:16505 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    > TX packets:16505 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    > collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
    > RX bytes:1750236 (1.6 Mb) TX bytes:1750236 (1.6 Mb)
    >
    >
    > cat /etc/resolv.conf
    > search testrac.com
    >
    > cat /etc/dhcpd.conf
    > cat: /etc/dhcpd.conf: No such file or directory
    >
    >
    > route add default gw 192.168.1.1
    >
    > SIOCADDRT: Network is unreachable
    >
    >
    > --------------------------
    >
    >
    > I've been looking for a good how-to on the web, but
    > can't find anything concise. If you know of some
    > good concise web pages, please refer me to them.
    >
    > Or, if you know what I need to do, please let
    > me know.
    >
    >
    > Thanks!


    I get the feeling this has a lot to do with the setup of your network.
    Windows is probably resolving the addresses magically, but Linux will
    whinge and complain about strange network setups.

    Firstly, I'd recommend lining up your Wireless and fixed network
    addresses. Unless you have 500 machines (you did say 2!), then you'll only
    need the one subnet. I'll advise with just the 192.168.1.x range.

    192.168.1.1 -> modem
    192.168.1.255 -> wireless gateway (responding to DHCP requests)
    192.168.1.2 -> red
    192.168.1.3 -> white

    Alternatively, with the 192.168.2.x subnet:
    192.168.2.1 -> modem
    192.168.2.254 -> wireless gateway (responding to DHCP requests)
    192.168.2.2 -> red
    192.168.2.3 -> white

    In windows, this is simple enough to configure. You need to hack out
    something like /etc/network/interfaces in Linux, but to test it's
    functionality, do the following manual.

    Example for RED
    ifconfig eth0 down
    ifconfig eth0 192.168.1.2
    route addd default gw 192.168.1.1

    ....then make some ping attempts. Interestingly, if you MUST have
    everything on the 192.168.2 subnet, then that's also possible - just make
    subsitutions as above. You can't add 192.168.1.1 as the default gateway at
    the moment, as Linux is probably having issues with you connected to the
    2.x network, and the gateway existing on 1.x. Maybe, maybe not, though.

    Here is my network configuration file, but is for Debian. RedHat 3 might
    be different.

    tmccoy@hackbox:~$ cat /etc/network/interfaces
    # /etc/network/interfaces -- configuration file for ifup(8), ifdown(8)

    # The loopback interface
    auto lo
    iface lo inet loopback

    # The first network card - this entry was created during the Debian installation
    # (network, broadcast and gateway are optional)
    auto eth0
    iface eth0 inet static
    address 192.168.1.2
    netmask 255.255.255.0
    network 192.168.1.0
    broadcast 192.168.1.255
    gateway 192.168.1.1

    Simplify the network topology and work upwards. You'll also find that a
    solid network config will be less likely to strangely die (as I've seen
    many times before).

    Note that all of this assumes your modem is doing NAT - the wirless router
    should really only be doing wireless work.

    Cheers

    Tim

    --
    "Linux... because rebooting is for adding new hardware!"

    http://home.swiftdsl.com.au/~tmccoy
    MSN: timsy_01@hotmail.com
    ICQ: 160341067


  4. Re: Configure DSL and Linux network

    > 192.168.1.255 -> wireless gateway (responding to DHCP requests)

    The above should be 192.168.1.254

    ....oops

    Tim



    --
    "Linux... because rebooting is for adding new hardware!"

    http://home.swiftdsl.com.au/~tmccoy
    MSN: timsy_01@hotmail.com
    ICQ: 160341067


  5. Re: Configure DSL and Linux network

    linuxquestion@yahoo.com wrote in news:1118975524.162199.71560
    @f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:

    > I have 2 XP/Linux dual boot machines.
    >
    > Previously, these machines were connected with a
    > crossover cable, and they could talk to each other.
    > But now, there is a DSL modem, and router that
    > is not configured right.
    >
    > I have installed DSL on the XP side, and it is working well.
    > Now, I'm trying to get it to work on Linux. First and
    > foremost, I need the two Linux machines to talk to each
    > other, through the router. Internet is secondary.


    Pretty complicated. With a Westell modem/router, you could plug the modem
    ethernet cable into a hub (Can use switches instead of a hus, switches
    are more expensive.), then plug each computer into the hub with an
    ethernet cable. You can plug a wireless access point into the hub and
    even more hubs into the hub. The modem will give out IP addresses and set
    the linux machines to use DHCP and the windows machine to automatic TCP
    config. Give each machine a name and you should be all set. Install samba
    to share stuff from linux to Windows, use the same workgroup on all
    machines, and this will work and is not that hard to do.

    Yes there are further details but if you don't think you like this idea,
    then no point on going on further. This would be the simplest way to do
    it though. If you want more details then tell what distro you are using
    on the linux machines and "what kind of talking" that you need between
    the machines. Are you sharing drives and printers? Do you want to use one
    of the linux talk programs? Will you be running any servers like web,
    ftp, or games?

    Webmin is a most excellent linux tool to configure everything linux, from
    hardware and networking to all system processes and samba sharing. You
    use webmin from your browser to config the linux machines, can sit at
    your XP machine and use your browser and webmin to configure and
    administer your linux machines right from one browser. Pretty cool.
    http://www.webmin.com

    Those external Ethernet Westell modem/routers kick butt, I use one at
    work for 10 machines all over the place and they all have blazing
    Internet and can share between them all. Using them for all small
    LAN/Internet stuff now and they are a dream come true. They are easy to
    setup and configure with the web interface. I setup all my friends and
    family this way because they work, stay connected to the Internet all the
    time if you want, and are powerful if you want to IP forward or port
    forward, use various services, etc.

    I have a small LAN with a Westell Wirespeed 2100 modem/router and have 1
    Fedora Core 3 machine and two Windows XP Pro machines fed from it. No
    problems at all, this setup rocks.

    --
    ~Ohmster
    "Read Ohmster" in subject, bypass spam filter.
    ohmster /a/t/ newsguy dot com

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