How to build one binary for all Redhat systems? - Redhat

This is a discussion on How to build one binary for all Redhat systems? - Redhat ; Hello, My development project's software must run on multiple Redhat-based platforms (All the FedoraCore series, Redhat Enterprise Linux/Centos 4.x and 3.x, possibly Redhat 9). I want to build as few binary flavors as possible. My best scenario would find us ...

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Thread: How to build one binary for all Redhat systems?

  1. How to build one binary for all Redhat systems?

    Hello,

    My development project's software must run on multiple Redhat-based
    platforms (All the FedoraCore series, Redhat Enterprise Linux/Centos
    4.x and 3.x, possibly Redhat 9). I want to build as few binary flavors
    as possible. My best scenario would find us building one binary that
    works on all these platforms.

    Is this possible? If not, can I build fewer binary packages then
    number of platforms, and if so, which build systems should I build on?

    Fyi, our software uses SystemV message queues extensively...in case
    this happens to be system-dependent.

    -Matt
    --
    Remove the "downwithspammers-" text to email me.

  2. Re: How to build one binary for all Redhat systems?

    On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 22:40:13 -0500, Matt wrote:

    > My development project's software must run on multiple Redhat-based
    > platforms (All the FedoraCore series, Redhat Enterprise Linux/Centos
    > 4.x and 3.x, possibly Redhat 9). I want to build as few binary flavors
    > as possible. My best scenario would find us building one binary that
    > works on all these platforms.


    First of all, you'll need at least one binary RPM for each
    architecture you want to support: i386, IA-64, mips and so on.

    Build the RPM for the lowest-class CPU in each family. For example,
    build an i386 package, not an i686 one. You'll probably have trial
    and error on other arches though...

    Package revision numbers may trip you up, though. Your first task
    will be to determine the RPM versions for the packages you need on
    the *most-conservative* distribution: this is probably RHEL3 for you.
    In the RPM spec file, tag the package dependancies for these
    versions. This may be enough because RHEL3 should be forward
    compatible to RHEL4 and FCn.

    HTH

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