First Posting - GLIBC question - Questions

This is a discussion on First Posting - GLIBC question - Questions ; In order to install some software I need "glibc 2.1", "Glib 1.2.x" and "Libstdc++ 2.9.0". It seems there is a relationship between the library filenames in my "/lib" directory and the "common names" given above. How can I determine the ...

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Thread: First Posting - GLIBC question

  1. First Posting - GLIBC question

    In order to install some software I need "glibc 2.1", "Glib 1.2.x" and
    "Libstdc++ 2.9.0". It seems there is a relationship between the library
    filenames in my "/lib" directory and the "common names" given above. How
    can I determine the "common name" and file version relationship on my PC?

    I am running Slackware v8.1 on it. I have used 'ldconfig -V' to get
    "ldconfig (GNU libc) 2.2.3" as a response. Which *lib* is this, and what
    is its common name? I have also seen references to "glibc2" in some
    documentation.

    1) What is the difference between GNU libc, glibc, Glib, glibc2, and
    libstdc++?

    2) Is there an easy command to show the *lib" version and determine the
    common name? For example, I can use 'uname -a' to get a lot of info
    about the linux kernel version.

    I hope I have addressed this question to the right group. If not, shunt
    me to the correct group please.


    TIA

  2. Re: First Posting - GLIBC question

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    Brad Jennings wrote:
    > In order to install some software I need "glibc 2.1", "Glib 1.2.x" and
    > "Libstdc++ 2.9.0". It seems there is a relationship between the library
    > filenames in my "/lib" directory and the "common names" given above. How
    > can I determine the "common name" and file version relationship on my PC?
    >
    > I am running Slackware v8.1 on it.


    Thats an /old/ Slackware. You really should upgrade if you can.

    > I have used 'ldconfig -V' to get
    > "ldconfig (GNU libc) 2.2.3" as a response. Which *lib* is this, and what
    > is its common name? I have also seen references to "glibc2" in some
    > documentation.
    >
    > 1) What is the difference between GNU libc, glibc, Glib, glibc2, and
    > libstdc++?


    GNU libc is glibc. glibc2 is v2 of glibc. /lib/libc.so.6 is the library that
    implements glibc. You can check out which version, exactly, of glibc2 (aka
    glibc aka GNU libc) libc.so.6 implements by /running/ libc.so.6
    ~ $ /lib/libc.so.6
    GNU C Library stable release version 2.3.4, by Roland McGrath et al.

    glib is the GTK support library (GTK being the Gimp ToolKit, the graphics
    widgets used by the Gimp, and the basis for the graphics of the Gnome
    desktop). /usr/lib/libglib* are the libraries (there are more than one,
    depending on whether you have glib v1 or glib v2 or both installed).

    libstdc++ is the C++ standard I/O library. It is used by any C++ program
    compiled with the G++ GNU C++ compiler. It contains the common C++ routines
    required for conformance to the C++ standard. You'll find this library as
    /usr/lib/libstdc++* (again, there are a few variations, depending on your
    linkage requirements and the version of G++ used to compile the C++ programs).


    > 2) Is there an easy command to show the *lib" version and determine the
    > common name? For example, I can use 'uname -a' to get a lot of info
    > about the linux kernel version.


    Take a look at the package descriptions in /var/adm/packages. grep for the
    library you are interested in to locate the package (IIRC, Slackware 8.1 still
    used the 8.3 TGZ package naming format, so the package names aren't very
    descriptive), and read the description text in the package file that
    implements the library.

    Other than that, your next best bet is "ldconfig -v"

    And, some libraries will "execute" (like the glibc example above) and tell you
    their version info.


    > I hope I have addressed this question to the right group. If not, shunt
    > me to the correct group please.


    This is as good a group as any. You might also want to ask your Slackware
    related questions in alt.os.linux.slackware, or join the #slackware IRC group

    - --
    Lew Pitcher

    Master Codewright & JOAT-in-training | GPG public key available on request
    Registered Linux User #112576 (http://counter.li.org/)
    Slackware - Because I know what I'm doing.
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    =OAUb
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

  3. Re: First Posting - GLIBC question

    Lew,

    Thanks very much for the response. It really helped. I imagine there is
    no difference between writing "glib" or "Glib" when speaking or
    communicating to someone else about the GTK libraries. I imagine the
    difference would only matter when communicating the text to the
    case-sensitive user-interface. Is this correct?

    Also, in most correspondence, reference to "glibc" imply "glibc2" or
    "GNU libc v2" because it is the libraries most current, and hopefully,
    most commonly used library. Is this correct?

    Why the naming convention "libc.so.6"? What does the "6" mean? I assume
    it is some internal revision number, but I could be wrong. Shouldn't it
    be libc.so.2.2.3, or something similar?

    Lew Pitcher wrote:
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > Brad Jennings wrote:
    >
    >>I am running Slackware v8.1 on it.

    >
    >
    > Thats an /old/ Slackware. You really should upgrade if you can.


    I'm using old hardware, so slackware 8.1 seemed appropriate for the
    environment.
    >
    >
    >>
    >>1) What is the difference between GNU libc, glibc, Glib, glibc2, and
    >>libstdc++?

    >
    >
    > GNU libc is glibc. glibc2 is v2 of glibc. /lib/libc.so.6 is the library that
    > implements glibc. You can check out which version, exactly, of glibc2 (aka
    > glibc aka GNU libc) libc.so.6 implements by /running/ libc.so.6
    > ~ $ /lib/libc.so.6
    > GNU C Library stable release version 2.3.4, by Roland McGrath et al.


    I got this:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    vssbaj@bifrost:~$ /lib/libc.so.6
    GNU C Library stable release version 2.2.3, by Roland McGrath et al.
    Copyright (C) 1992-1999, 2000, 2001 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
    This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.
    There is NO warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A
    PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
    Compiled by GNU CC version 2.95.3 20010315 (release).
    Compiled on a Linux 2.4.4 system on 2001-05-25.
    Available extensions:
    GNU libio by Per Bothner
    crypt add-on version 2.1 by Michael Glad and others
    linuxthreads-0.9 by Xavier Leroy
    BIND-8.2.3-T5B
    libthread_db work sponsored by Alpha Processor Inc
    NIS(YP)/NIS+ NSS modules 0.19 by Thorsten Kukuk
    Report bugs using the `glibcbug' script to .
    vssbaj@bifrost:~$
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > glib is the GTK support library (GTK being the Gimp ToolKit, the graphics
    > widgets used by the Gimp, and the basis for the graphics of the Gnome
    > desktop). /usr/lib/libglib* are the libraries (there are more than one,
    > depending on whether you have glib v1 or glib v2 or both installed).


    Nothing shows up when I do this:

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    vssbaj@bifrost:/usr/lib$ ls *glib*
    /bin/ls: *glib*: No such file or directory
    vssbaj@bifrost:/usr/lib$
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I guess I need to install that package, or download it from Gimp's
    website (if that's possible).

    >
    > libstdc++ is the C++ standard I/O library. It is used by any C++ program
    > compiled with the G++ GNU C++ compiler. It contains the common C++ routines
    > required for conformance to the C++ standard. You'll find this library as
    > /usr/lib/libstdc++* (again, there are a few variations, depending on your
    > linkage requirements and the version of G++ used to compile the C++ programs).
    >


    I need Libstdc++ 2.9.0, but it looks like I have
    libstdc++-3-libc6.2-2.so.3 (shared object) and
    libstdc++-3-libc6.2-2.so.3 (static library). I'm not sure if this is
    version 3, or v6.2-2. Does anyone know which this is?

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    vssbaj@bifrost:/usr/lib$ ls -al *c++*
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 2347326 May 27 2001
    libstdc++-3-libc6.2-2-2.10.0.a
    -r-xr-xr-x 1 root root 274724 May 27 2001
    libstdc++-3-libc6.2-2-2.10.0.so*
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 30 Apr 21 14:47
    libstdc++-libc6.2-2.a.3 -> libstdc++-3-libc6.2-2-2.10.0.a
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 31 Apr 21 14:47
    libstdc++-libc6.2-2.so.3 -> libstdc++-3-libc6.2-2-2.10.0.so*
    vssbaj@bifrost:/usr/lib$
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    >
    >>2) Is there an easy command to show the *lib" version and determine the
    >>common name? For example, I can use 'uname -a' to get a lot of info
    >>about the linux kernel version.

    >
    >
    > Take a look at the package descriptions in /var/adm/packages. grep for the
    > library you are interested in to locate the package (IIRC, Slackware 8.1 still
    > used the 8.3 TGZ package naming format, so the package names aren't very
    > descriptive), and read the description text in the package file that
    > implements the library.
    >
    > Other than that, your next best bet is "ldconfig -v"
    >
    > And, some libraries will "execute" (like the glibc example above) and tell you
    > their version info.

    Thanks for the tip. It appears that some will execute and tell me their
    version, some others will produce a segmentation fault error.

    >
    >
    >
    >>I hope I have addressed this question to the right group. If not, shunt
    >>me to the correct group please.

    >
    >
    > This is as good a group as any. You might also want to ask your Slackware
    > related questions in alt.os.linux.slackware, or join the #slackware IRC group


    Unfortunately, I don't think that group "alt" is available on the news
    server I'm using. True, I may misunderstand how the news group hierarchy
    and availability are administered. I looked for a
    "comp.os.linux.slackware" to no avail, so I subscribed to
    "comp.os.linux.questions".

    >
    > - --
    > Lew Pitcher
    >
    > Master Codewright & JOAT-in-training | GPG public key available on request
    > Registered Linux User #112576 (http://counter.li.org/)
    > Slackware - Because I know what I'm doing.
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    > Version: GnuPG v1.2.7 (GNU/Linux)
    >
    > iD8DBQFC4ZpQagVFX4UWr64RAgzDAJ9fiOWwSjHDyD41DzzeTs HWDXQ6kwCg2weH
    > pSAfa8B+nIOGFZ2tWjcLPl8=
    > =OAUb
    > -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----


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