Looking for research/information on backup systems for my Linux system - Questions

This is a discussion on Looking for research/information on backup systems for my Linux system - Questions ; Greetings! I'm about to start researching to determine the best backup solution for my home systems. (I am not a business. I have one Linux-based and one Solaris computer, and it needs to be as inexpensive as possible, but reliable!) ...

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Thread: Looking for research/information on backup systems for my Linux system

  1. Looking for research/information on backup systems for my Linux system


    Greetings!

    I'm about to start researching to determine the best backup solution
    for my home systems. (I am not a business. I have one Linux-based and
    one Solaris computer, and it needs to be as inexpensive as possible, but
    reliable!) :-)

    Since the 1980s I've used, and loved, tape backup. Perhaps it's just
    this backup I have now that makes me wonder. I have a Travan drive on my
    Linux system. I have had trouble with it. I've had to ship it back to
    the manufacturer a couple of times, and I've purchased a new drive, TR5
    instead of TR4, which means all those (expensive) tapes need to be
    replaced...

    Something in me still prefers tape backup. (And, again, I've been
    happy with tape backups since the 1980s.)

    I'm aware that there are CD-RW backups, but I don't (yet) know much
    about them. I believe you can re-write to the CD multiple times? (I just
    don't think much about writing to a CD, and then, the older it gets, and
    the more out-of-date this backup becomes, there is nothing to do but throw
    it away.)

    And then, disk backups. I would presume that some Linux people are
    using disks for backups. The speed of access would be an advantage, but I
    don't need backups often. I don't mind going through the tape looking for
    the file(s) I need.

    Can someone help me, or point me to, a reference for the cost of
    these three (and more if there are more of which I'm not at the moment
    aware) backup systems?

    (I'm also about to install a newer version of Linux, because my
    libraries are getting so old, too. More and more in the last year or so,
    when I try to install something new, I needed to update libraries, and the
    time is getting more than I have for my home systems.)

    I would appreciate whatever help you can offer!

    Thank you!

    Barry
    --
    Barry L. Bond | http://home.cfl.rr.com/os9barry/
    Software Engineer, ITT Industries | (My personal home web page, last
    | updated February 17, 2005)
    bbond@cfl.rr.com <- personal |

  2. Re: Looking for research/information on backup systems for my Linuxsystem

    Barry L. Bond wrote:
    > Greetings!
    >
    > I'm about to start researching to determine the best backup solution
    > for my home systems. (I am not a business. I have one Linux-based and
    > one Solaris computer, and it needs to be as inexpensive as possible, but
    > reliable!) :-)



    In recent years, I've been using DVD-RAM for small systems and IOMEGA
    REV drives for larger storage. Both are reasonably inexpensive. I
    have some stuff tucked away:

    http://www.aplawrence.com/Reviews/dvdram.html

    http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/st...2181278&EDATE=
    (DVD-RAM reliability)


    http://www.aplawrence.com/Linux/iomegafedoracore2.html (REV w/ Fedora
    core 2)
    http://www.aplawrence.com/Blog/B1231.html (Speed of REV)

    I use a commercial backup product (http://microlite.com) with both of
    these on Linux.


    --
    Tony Lawrence
    Unix/Linux/Mac OS X resources: http://aplawrence.com

  3. Re: Looking for research/information on backup systems for my Linux system

    In the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.admin, in article
    , Barry L. Bond wrote:

    >I'm about to start researching to determine the best backup solution
    >for my home systems. (I am not a business. I have one Linux-based and
    >one Solaris computer, and it needs to be as inexpensive as possible, but
    >reliable!) :-)


    The Sloaris box - is that x86, or one of the many Sparc designs?

    >Since the 1980s I've used, and loved, tape backup. Perhaps it's just
    >this backup I have now that makes me wonder. I have a Travan drive on my
    >Linux system. I have had trouble with it.


    I'd bet if you did a search on groups.google.com, you'd find "tape backup
    problem" as keywords gives a million or more hits. ;-)

    >Something in me still prefers tape backup. (And, again, I've been
    >happy with tape backups since the 1980s.)


    That _does_ have the advantage of easily being able to store the media
    off site, which might be a disaster scenario.

    >I'm aware that there are CD-RW backups, but I don't (yet) know much
    >about them. I believe you can re-write to the CD multiple times?


    Yes, but you are limited in capacity per media.

    >(I just don't think much about writing to a CD, and then, the older it
    >gets, and the more out-of-date this backup becomes, there is nothing to
    >do but throw it away.)


    CDs can be cheap, and the drives aren't that expensive. But even your
    tapes only have a limited life, and are (as you note) expensive to replace
    and/or maintain.

    >And then, disk backups. I would presume that some Linux people are using
    >disks for backups. The speed of access would be an advantage, but I don't
    >need backups often. I don't mind going through the tape looking for the
    >file(s) I need.


    Depends on the disaster scenario you are protecting against. Disks are
    comparatively cheap, and you can get 'removable' drives (though the
    life is now predicated on insertion/removal cycles). The technique I'm
    using at home is to install an extra disk in several computers, and
    simply pour the bits from one computer to the 'backup' disk on the
    other. Because I'm using a common installation on all systems, I need
    not back that up, and only have to back up the "data". For long term
    off-site storage, I cut a CD, and keep that in a different county.

    For your Linux/Sol setup, I'd suggest putting an extra drive in each, and
    using rsync or similar to keep the extra drive as a mirror of the primary
    drive in the "other" computer.

    Old guy

  4. Re: Looking for research/information on backup systems for my Linuxsystem


    Hi Tony!

    Thank you SO MUCH for your help! I will (soon) look at the URLs you
    provided. Thank you for being so generous!

    God bless you!

    Barry

    --
    Barry L. Bond | http://home.cfl.rr.com/os9barry/
    Software Engineer, ITT Industries | (My personal home web page, last
    | updated February 17, 2005)
    bbond@cfl.rr.com <- personal |

  5. Re: Looking for research/information on backup systems for my Linux system


    Hi Moe!

    >The Sloaris box - is that x86, or one of the many Sparc designs?


    It is an Ultra 30. :-) One of the many!

    >I'd bet if you did a search on groups.google.com, you'd find "tape backup
    >problem" as keywords gives a million or more hits. ;-)


    Perhaps I was just lucky. But I've had really NO problems with tape
    backups until this Travan drive on my Linux system! (I've always done
    backups frequently enough, and I've always been able to restore from them,
    fortunately INfrequently!) :-)

    >Depends on the disaster scenario you are protecting against. Disks are
    >comparatively cheap, and you can get 'removable' drives (though the
    >life is now predicated on insertion/removal cycles). The technique I'm
    >using at home is to install an extra disk in several computers, and
    >simply pour the bits from one computer to the 'backup' disk on the
    >other. Because I'm using a common installation on all systems, I need
    >not back that up, and only have to back up the "data". For long term
    >off-site storage, I cut a CD, and keep that in a different county.


    >For your Linux/Sol setup, I'd suggest putting an extra drive in each, and
    >using rsync or similar to keep the extra drive as a mirror of the primary
    >drive in the "other" computer.


    Thank you. It is a new consideration. I hadn't thought of it, but
    it isn't a bad idea.

    I'll consider it! Thank you VERY MUCH for your kind assistance!

    God bless you!

    Barry
    --
    Barry L. Bond | http://home.cfl.rr.com/os9barry/
    Software Engineer, ITT Industries | (My personal home web page, last
    | updated February 17, 2005)
    bbond@cfl.rr.com <- personal |

  6. Re: Looking for research/information on backup systems for my Linuxsystem

    Barry L. Bond wrote:
    > Hi Moe!
    >
    >
    >>The Sloaris box - is that x86, or one of the many Sparc designs?

    >
    >
    > It is an Ultra 30. :-) One of the many!
    >
    >
    >>I'd bet if you did a search on groups.google.com, you'd find "tape backup
    >>problem" as keywords gives a million or more hits. ;-)

    >
    >
    > Perhaps I was just lucky. But I've had really NO problems with tape
    > backups until this Travan drive on my Linux system! (I've always done
    > backups frequently enough, and I've always been able to restore from them,
    > fortunately INfrequently!) :-)


    Travan is cheap junk. I strongly encourage not using these for anything
    important.

    >
    >>For your Linux/Sol setup, I'd suggest putting an extra drive in each, and
    >>using rsync or similar to keep the extra drive as a mirror of the primary
    >>drive in the "other" computer.

    >
    >
    > Thank you. It is a new consideration. I hadn't thought of it, but
    > it isn't a bad idea.


    Actually, it IS a bad idea. It's a great idea as PART of a backup
    strategy, but appallingly lousy if it is the only thing used. Backup
    needs to be removable and use inexpensive media so that it can be
    arbitrarily deep (reaching back in time) and so that it can be easily
    moved off site to guard against physical disasters.

    >
    > I'll consider it! Thank you VERY MUCH for your kind assistance!
    >
    > God bless you!



    Why do you feel it necessary to spread your religious beliefs with every
    post? I find it quite offensive. Not everyone shares your belief
    systems. I don't urge secular humanism on you when I offer assistance,
    do I? Why? Because it would be rude and presumptuous to do so:
    whatever nonsense you choose to believe is entirely YOUR business and I
    feel no need to involve you in my own. I wish you would observe the
    same courtesy.

    --
    Tony Lawrence
    Unix/Linux/Mac OS X resources: http://aplawrence.com

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