Internet connection problem - Questions

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  1. Internet connection problem

    I am in the process of upgrading my home network from a dial-up to
    broadband account. The only choice that I have for a broadband account is
    Mediacom in central Iowa. Now my hub computer (a rh 8.0 box) can connect
    to mediacom, but mediacom announces the dns address at connect time. The
    hub computer has the address somewhere, but the client boxes
    don't. Therefore none of my client boxes can reach the web, because they
    don't know what the current dns address is. My client machines are as
    follows:

    1. WinXP
    2. Fedora Core 1
    3. Win-ME (via Win4lin)
    4. Win-98

    I am assuming that I am going to have to set up a dns server on the rh 8.0
    box, but I don't have the faintest idea how and what kind of script will
    be necessary.

    Terry

  2. Re: Internet connection problem

    Terry A. Haimann wrote:
    > I am in the process of upgrading my home network from a dial-up to
    > broadband account. The only choice that I have for a broadband account is
    > Mediacom in central Iowa. Now my hub computer (a rh 8.0 box) can connect
    > to mediacom, but mediacom announces the dns address at connect time. The
    > hub computer has the address somewhere, but the client boxes
    > don't. Therefore none of my client boxes can reach the web, because they
    > don't know what the current dns address is. My client machines are as
    > follows:
    >
    > 1. WinXP
    > 2. Fedora Core 1
    > 3. Win-ME (via Win4lin)
    > 4. Win-98
    >
    > I am assuming that I am going to have to set up a dns server on the rh 8.0
    > box, but I don't have the faintest idea how and what kind of script will
    > be necessary.
    >
    > Terry

    Why not google for internet connection sharing in RH8.0. You might be
    suprised what you find.

    --
    Nobody really cares if you're miserable, So you might as well be happy.

  3. Re: Internet connection problem

    "Vance Howard" wrote in message
    news:WMzDd.77167$uM5.59934@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > Terry A. Haimann wrote:
    >> I am in the process of upgrading my home network from a dial-up to
    >> broadband account. The only choice that I have for a broadband account
    >> is
    >> Mediacom in central Iowa. Now my hub computer (a rh 8.0 box) can connect
    >> to mediacom, but mediacom announces the dns address at connect time. The
    >> hub computer has the address somewhere, but the client boxes
    >> don't. Therefore none of my client boxes can reach the web, because they
    >> don't know what the current dns address is. My client machines are as
    >> follows:
    >>
    >> 1. WinXP
    >> 2. Fedora Core 1
    >> 3. Win-ME (via Win4lin)
    >> 4. Win-98 I am assuming that I am going to have to set up a dns server on
    >> the rh 8.0
    >> box, but I don't have the faintest idea how and what kind of script will
    >> be necessary.
    >>
    >> Terry

    > Why not google for internet connection sharing in RH8.0. You might be
    > suprised what you find.
    >
    > --
    > Nobody really cares if you're miserable, So you might as well be happy.


    One quick and dirty answer is to plug in the DNS addresses into all of the
    boxes. A better way is to do your own DNS with your linux box (don't use an
    old version of named).


    Randy



  4. Re: Internet connection problem

    I am running iptables now for a firewall, what changes would I have to
    make to the following:

    # remove any existing rules
    # This is a basic script that I modified from a Red Hat Linux for Dummies.
    iptables --flush
    iptables --flush -t nat
    iptables -X

    # deny all traffic to start
    iptables --policy INPUT DROP
    iptables --policy OUTPUT DROP
    iptables --policy FORWARD ACCEPT

    # allow all internal traffic
    iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -o lo
    iptables -A INPUT -j ACCEPT -i lo

    # allow all internal network traffic
    iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -o eth0
    iptables -A INPUT -j ACCEPT -i eth0

    # allow outgoing internet traffic on eth1
    iptables -A OUTPUT -o eth1 -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
    iptables -A INPUT -i eth1 -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT

    # use nat
    iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth1 -j MASQUERADE












    On Fri, 07 Jan 2005 17:20:22 +0000, noi wrote:

    > On Fri, 07 Jan 2005 15:48:49 +0000, Terry A. Haimann thoughtfully wrote:
    >
    >> I am in the process of upgrading my home network from a dial-up to
    >> broadband account. The only choice that I have for a broadband account is
    >> Mediacom in central Iowa. Now my hub computer (a rh 8.0 box) can connect
    >> to mediacom, but mediacom announces the dns address at connect time. The
    >> hub computer has the address somewhere, but the client boxes don't.
    >> Therefore none of my client boxes can reach the web, because they don't
    >> know what the current dns address is. My client machines are as follows:
    >>
    >> 1. WinXP
    >> 2. Fedora Core 1
    >> 3. Win-ME (via Win4lin)
    >> 4. Win-98
    >>
    >> I am assuming that I am going to have to set up a dns server on the rh 8.0
    >> box, but I don't have the faintest idea how and what kind of script will
    >> be necessary.
    >>
    >> Terry

    >
    >
    > I think it would be easiest to pick up a cheap router with firewall and
    > connect all the machines to the router.
    >
    > Are you using the RH8 box a the dial up server for the other machines now?
    > I think need to enable Iptable NAT and Forwarding on
    > the RH8 box. You can assign static or keep your current static Private
    > addresses but the gateway address on your client machines should point to
    > the hub. You can have the hub assign addresses by dhcp but in small
    > networks that's a overhead you really don't need, unless of course you
    > just want to learn how to do it.
    >
    > I could try explaining this in detail but there are lots of better
    > resources on the Internet than me. Try this link for starters:
    > http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/Lin...rkGateway.html



  5. Re: Internet connection problem

    I am running iptables now for a firewall, what changes would I have to
    make to the following:

    # remove any existing rules
    # This is a basic script that I modified from a Red Hat Linux for Dummies.
    iptables --flush
    iptables --flush -t nat
    iptables -X

    # deny all traffic to start
    iptables --policy INPUT DROP
    iptables --policy OUTPUT DROP
    iptables --policy FORWARD ACCEPT

    # allow all internal traffic
    iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -o lo
    iptables -A INPUT -j ACCEPT -i lo

    # allow all internal network traffic
    iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -o eth0
    iptables -A INPUT -j ACCEPT -i eth0

    # allow outgoing internet traffic on eth1
    iptables -A OUTPUT -o eth1 -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
    iptables -A INPUT -i eth1 -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT

    # use nat
    iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth1 -j MASQUERADE


    On Fri, 07 Jan 2005 17:20:22 +0000, noi wrote:

    > On Fri, 07 Jan 2005 15:48:49 +0000, Terry A. Haimann thoughtfully wrote:
    >
    >> I am in the process of upgrading my home network from a dial-up to
    >> broadband account. The only choice that I have for a broadband account is
    >> Mediacom in central Iowa. Now my hub computer (a rh 8.0 box) can connect
    >> to mediacom, but mediacom announces the dns address at connect time. The
    >> hub computer has the address somewhere, but the client boxes don't.
    >> Therefore none of my client boxes can reach the web, because they don't
    >> know what the current dns address is. My client machines are as follows:
    >>
    >> 1. WinXP
    >> 2. Fedora Core 1
    >> 3. Win-ME (via Win4lin)
    >> 4. Win-98
    >>
    >> I am assuming that I am going to have to set up a dns server on the rh 8.0
    >> box, but I don't have the faintest idea how and what kind of script will
    >> be necessary.
    >>
    >> Terry

    >
    >
    > I think it would be easiest to pick up a cheap router with firewall and
    > connect all the machines to the router.
    >
    > Are you using the RH8 box a the dial up server for the other machines now?
    > I think need to enable Iptable NAT and Forwarding on
    > the RH8 box. You can assign static or keep your current static Private
    > addresses but the gateway address on your client machines should point to
    > the hub. You can have the hub assign addresses by dhcp but in small
    > networks that's a overhead you really don't need, unless of course you
    > just want to learn how to do it.
    >
    > I could try explaining this in detail but there are lots of better
    > resources on the Internet than me. Try this link for starters:
    > http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/Lin...rkGateway.html



  6. Re: Internet connection problem

    In article ,
    Terry A. Haimann wrote:

    >I am in the process of upgrading my home network from a dial-up to
    >broadband account. The only choice that I have for a broadband account is
    >Mediacom in central Iowa. Now my hub computer (a rh 8.0 box) can connect
    >to mediacom, but mediacom announces the dns address at connect time.


    Idiots! The IP address of a name server has to be reasonably constant
    so that it can be found. There should be no reason for someone to be
    playing "musical IP addresses" with this. Looks as if your "only choice"
    is a bunch of technical incompetent fools.

    >The hub computer has the address somewhere, but the client boxes
    >don't. Therefore none of my client boxes can reach the web, because they
    >don't know what the current dns address is. My client machines are as
    >follows:
    >
    >1. WinXP
    >2. Fedora Core 1
    >3. Win-ME (via Win4lin)
    >4. Win-98


    Oh crap. Windoze boxes are extremely chatty, always trying to find new
    hosts to drop their pants in front of. I'd strongly suggest setting up a
    caching/forwarding nameserver on your RH box, and pointing everyone else
    at it.

    [compton ~]$ zgrep -w bind rpms.8.0-i386.gz | sed 's/^.*0 //'
    1818173 Sep 03 21:10 bind-9.2.1-9.i386.rpm
    875526 Sep 03 21:10 bind-devel-9.2.1-9.i386.rpm
    698279 Sep 03 21:10 bind-utils-9.2.1-9.i386.rpm
    201374 Sep 03 21:36 redhat-config-bind-1.8.1-18.noarch.rpm
    [compton ~]$ zgrep name rpms.8.0-i386.gz | sed 's/^.*0 //'
    6988 Sep 03 21:10 caching-nameserver-7.2-4.noarch.rpm
    [compton ~]$

    You also want to look at a couple of HOWTOs:

    91563 Dec 23 2001 DNS-HOWTO
    287057 Jul 23 2002 Security-Quickstart-Redhat-HOWTO

    >I am assuming that I am going to have to set up a dns server on the rh 8.0
    >box, but I don't have the faintest idea how and what kind of script will
    >be necessary.


    The stuff that comes with the 'caching-nameserver' package should tell
    you what you need. You really should set it up so that you are
    authoritative for your own hosts (the world won't know what their names
    are, so you will need to be "correct"),

    I'm sure you are aware that RH8.0 has been unsupported since 2003, and
    really shouldn't be exposed any more.

    Old guy

  7. Re: Internet connection problem

    Moe Trin wrote:

    > Oh crap. Windoze boxes are extremely chatty, always trying to find new
    > hosts to drop their pants in front of.


    Classic.

    ../k

  8. Re: Internet connection problem

    On Friday 07 January 2005 07:48, Terry A. Haimann wrote:

    > I am in the process of upgrading my home network from a dial-up to
    > broadband account. The only choice that I have for a broadband
    > account is
    > Mediacom in central Iowa. Now my hub computer (a rh 8.0 box) can
    > connect to mediacom, but mediacom announces the dns address at connect
    > time. The hub computer has the address somewhere, but the client boxes
    > don't. Therefore none of my client boxes can reach the web, because
    > they
    > don't know what the current dns address is. My client machines are as
    > follows:
    >
    > 1. WinXP
    > 2. Fedora Core 1
    > 3. Win-ME (via Win4lin)
    > 4. Win-98
    >
    > I am assuming that I am going to have to set up a dns server on the rh
    > 8.0 box, but I don't have the faintest idea how and what kind of
    > script will be necessary.


    Do you really mean DNS? Or is it your IP address that is announced?
    Normally, an internet provider's DNS(s) is constant, never changing,
    but periodically changing a customer's IP address is the norm. With my
    broadband connection, my IP address is changed at least every 3 days,
    sometimes twice in 24 hours.

    If you set up the RH 8.0 box as a router/gateway with a NAT (network
    address translation) installed, and the other boxes as a local network
    plugged into a switch or hub, the other boxes won't need to know the
    DNS's of Mediacom or even the IP address. All they'll need to know is
    the local network Gateway address, which you set and control, to access
    the internet.

    The easiest way to do all this is to buy a hardware router/switch that
    has NAT and DHCP and firewall and proxy, etc. built-in instead of
    trying to set it up yourself. That's what I did. Took about 30
    minutes to have it up and running, and that includes unpacking the box
    and reading the instructions.


    --
    Stefan Patric
    NoLife Polymath Group
    tootek2@yahoo.com

  9. Re: Internet connection problem

    Terry A. Haimann wrote:

    >> I am in the process of upgrading my home network from a dial-up to
    >> broadband account. The only choice that I have for a broadband account is
    >> Mediacom in central Iowa. Now my hub computer (a rh 8.0 box) can connect
    >> to mediacom, but mediacom announces the dns address at connect time.


    ibuprofin@painkiller.example.tld (Moe Trin) posted:

    > Idiots! The IP address of a name server has to be reasonably constant
    > so that it can be found. There should be no reason for someone to be
    > playing "musical IP addresses" with this. Looks as if your "only choice"
    > is a bunch of technical incompetent fools.


    It's quite common for ISPs to tell you what DNS server to use as you
    connect, some do rotate several of them amongst their users (I'm told) to
    spread the load around. You are told it as you connect, at the same time
    that you're assigned your own IP, and it's a quite well known procedure, so
    it *can* easily be found. You don't need it when you're not connected.

    A problem with that is the seemingly poor support for dynamic IPs with
    Linux (they're something that's been around for quite some time). If I
    configure my gateway box to use its own DNS server, the dialup connect
    script will often usurp it with the dynamically discovered ISP's DNS
    servers (rather than add them to the list, it puts them at the top).

    --
    If you insist on e-mailing me, use the reply-to address (it's real but
    temporary). But please reply to the group, like you're supposed to.

    This message was sent without a virus, please delete some files yourself.

  10. Re: Internet connection problem

    In article , Tim wrote:

    >It's quite common for ISPs to tell you what DNS server to use as you
    >connect, some do rotate several of them amongst their users (I'm told) to
    >spread the load around.


    The 'tell you at connect time' is a function of the windoze philosophy of
    minimizing the technical requirements of the user. Plug it in, and it just
    magically works. This is also an advantage if you are moving your computer
    from network to network (example, home to work, and vice-versa). It's often
    considered a security problem (where have you _ever_ heard that about a
    microsoft concept), as it's not under control of the user.

    It's not very likely for the ISP to be playing "musical IP addresses" with
    the DNS servers - as there really is some work needed to set up a server.
    Once done, there is no reason to tear it down, and rebuild it again for a
    whim. Load sharing is used, but DNS is not a CPU or bandwidth intensive task
    (as compared to for example, a web server).

    >A problem with that is the seemingly poor support for dynamic IPs with
    >Linux (they're something that's been around for quite some time). If I
    >configure my gateway box to use its own DNS server, the dialup connect
    >script will often usurp it with the dynamically discovered ISP's DNS
    >servers (rather than add them to the list, it puts them at the top).


    That depends on the tool you are using to connect. For dialup, what you
    are actually using is pppd and that definitely does NOT mess with
    /etc/resolv.conf (see the man page). "Helper" tools like kppp may alter
    /etc/resolv.conf, but that's easy to fix/prevent. (I put the word "Helper"
    in quotes, because they also hinder as much as help, and tend to confuse
    things.) If you are connecting via Ethernet (cable or DSL, but also for
    many home network setups), the name server setup is controlled by the DHCP
    server (meaning extra work for whoever set it up), and whatever client you
    are using.

    Very few of our systems ever move, so we spend the extra minute or so when
    installing them to set them to static addresses. With RFC1918 (which replaced
    RFC1597 from 1994) providing nearly 17.8 million usable IP addresses, the
    original rational for DHCP (lots of computers, not many addresses - see
    RFC0951 from 1985) hasn't existed for ten years. The only remaining reason
    for it to exist is the consumer market where the user is almost always
    lacking any technical knowledge, and depending on "expert" systems to make
    up for it. But the expert systems are only as good as the person who set
    them up.

    Old guy


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