Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals with embeddedsystem, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... ) - Questions

This is a discussion on Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals with embeddedsystem, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... ) - Questions ; Chris Cole wrote: > On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 21:09:35 +0000, DEMAINE Benoit-Pierre wrote: > > > > And why exactly do you feel it's reasonable to ask complete strangers to > 'mark' your work? What recompense do we get ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 41 to 53 of 53

Thread: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals with embeddedsystem, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

  1. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals withembedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

    Chris Cole wrote:
    > On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 21:09:35 +0000, DEMAINE Benoit-Pierre wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > And why exactly do you feel it's reasonable to ask complete strangers to
    > 'mark' your work? What recompense do we get for helping you present *your*
    > thesis? You're either very arrogant or very stupid.
    > HTH
    > Chris.
    >
    >

    Um, did he ask you to comment on his request? Nevertheless, you did,
    didn't you?

    And you did it by CHOICE, didn't you?

    Wow, maybe we're getting close to an answer to your question, aren't we?

    That is, he's making a request, and you can IGNORE his request, or you
    can CHOOSE to help him out. Either way, no one's forcing you to do
    anything--hell, you didn't even HAVE to read his post!

    People like you are amazing to behold, Mr. Scrooge. You won't go out of
    your way to help--that's your choice--but you don't mind taking a little
    time to sling ****.

    Thanks for breathing.

  2. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals withembedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

    DEMAINE Benoit-Pierre wrote:
    >> That bugs me too when I hear people phrase things like that. If they
    >> expect a favor, the least they can do is phrase the request politely.

    >
    >
    > If I expected my english to be good, I would not look for re-readers.
    > I may be wrong for many things. That is right, even in the way I ask for
    > help.
    >

    The correct term in English is "proof-readers."

    If I had the time to spare, I'd certainly help you out. I hope that
    someone will comply.

    FWIW, ten or fifteen years ago when newsgroups were predominantly
    education and industry driven, no one would have thought twice about
    your request.

    Sorry that we have so many putzes around now that choose to believe that
    THEIR agenda is the only reason that newsgroups still exist.

    'Luck with your thesis.

  3. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals with embedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

    "axlq" wrote in message
    news:cpaeb0$hf6$1@blue.rahul.net...

    > Even substituting "we" is acceptable in technical papers. I see it
    > often, and I like it because it allows one to communicate in active
    > voice without using "I":
    >
    > In embedded and limited systems, we desire consistency in
    > computing time and error ratio in each computation. We avoid
    > random searches because the slight gain in speed fails to
    > compensate for the resultant large variation in error ratio.
    >


    FWIW that's how we were taught to write when I was an undergraduate in 1980
    or so. It was always a slight puzzle to me who 'we' might be, since I was
    working alone. But most academic papers are, of course, group efforts.

    > -Alex


    --
    Roger



  4. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals with embedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

    On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 21:09:35 +0000, DEMAINE Benoit-Pierre
    wrote:

    >-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    >Hash: SHA1
    >
    >I have released the first full version of my thesis. I am looking for
    >rereaders to track syntax and phrasing problems.
    >
    >The reader is expected to try to understand what I wrote, and report any
    >problem.
    >

    (snipped)
    >
    >Like every one, I am in hurry; so please just mail me and tell me how
    >much time it will take to read it all.
    >
    >PS : one part is still missing. It will say the same thing as the web
    >page, but in the PDF.
    >
    >Many thanks for any help.
    >- --


    Wow! You're asking for a favor that will take
    hours and hours!

    I suggest, first, you run a "Spellchecker" on
    your text. A reader will forgive a misspelled word
    now and then, but *not* twenty misspellings per page
    is *VERY* unpleasant to read!

    Next, and here's the hard part, you need someone
    (called a "copy editor") to go through
    your material and correct all the English grammar
    mistakes. This effort will take 10-20 hours
    (though I'm strictly guessing) because I'd say
    60%-80% of your sentences require corrections, and
    your thesis is roughly 70 pages.

    Copy editors (usually) charge 25$-50$ per hour.
    If you have a friend, maybe they'll "edit" your
    material for free. But friends like that are
    difficult to find.

    Search the Internet for "copy editor hire".

    Your idea to include photos in your thesis seems
    like a good idea to me.

    Good Luck,
    [-Rick-]


  5. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals with embedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

    On Wed, 08 Dec 2004 10:41:16 +0000, Chris Cole
    wrote:

    >On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 21:09:35 +0000, DEMAINE Benoit-Pierre wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >And why exactly do you feel it's reasonable to ask complete strangers to
    >'mark' your work? What recompense do we get for helping you present *your*
    >thesis? You're either very arrogant or very stupid.
    >HTH
    >Chris.


    Ha ha.

    I agree with you. The "favor" the guy was asking
    is equivalent to asking someone to come to your
    house and install a new roof. And oh by the way,
    "I'm in a hurry" to have this done.

    This reminds me of an E-mail I received from a guy
    in China. He said he liked the articles in my
    "DSP Tips & Tricks" column of the IEEE Signal
    Processing magazine. Then he asked me to send
    him an electronic copy of all the articles
    ever published in the column!

    Now "that takes nerve", as we say.

    Ha ha.
    [-Rick-]


  6. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals with embedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )


    "Rick Lyons" wrote in message
    news:41bda162.85387937@news.sf.sbcglobal.net...
    > On Wed, 08 Dec 2004 10:41:16 +0000, Chris Cole
    > wrote:
    >
    > >On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 21:09:35 +0000, DEMAINE Benoit-Pierre wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >And why exactly do you feel it's reasonable to ask complete strangers to
    > >'mark' your work? What recompense do we get for helping you present

    *your*
    > >thesis? You're either very arrogant or very stupid.
    > >HTH
    > >Chris.

    >
    > Ha ha.
    >
    > I agree with you. The "favor" the guy was asking
    > is equivalent to asking someone to come to your
    > house and install a new roof. And oh by the way,
    > "I'm in a hurry" to have this done.
    >
    > This reminds me of an E-mail I received from a guy
    > in China. He said he liked the articles in my
    > "DSP Tips & Tricks" column of the IEEE Signal
    > Processing magazine. Then he asked me to send
    > him an electronic copy of all the articles
    > ever published in the column!
    >
    > Now "that takes nerve", as we say.
    >
    > Ha ha.
    > [-Rick-]
    >


    Does every word out of your mouths or every key pressed
    come with a click charge? Jeez. you guys!

    There really are some people who genuinely enjoy helping other
    people out, without need for reward other than the mental exercise
    or ego boost.

    Perhaps there are people who, in the process of critiquing the thesis,
    would get information out of it applicable to their own work. I started
    to read it with this in mind but was put off immediately by the spelling and
    grammar errors in the first few paragraphs. Anyone writing a thesis
    should be able to run a quick spell check. But that's not the point.

    The only valid complaints might be the tenor of the requests, which
    perhaps did sound arrogant and demanding, but that could be a cultural
    difference or a simple error in translation.

    And Rick, so what if someone asked for an electronic copy of "Tips
    and Tricks"??? As far as anyone knows, that could be a mouse
    click (or two) away for you! That would not be too much to ask, would it?

    Lighten Up, Fellas!

    Rufus




  7. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals with embedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

    On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 11:17:08 -0500, "Rufus V. Smith"
    wrote:


    >"Rick Lyons" wrote in message
    >news:41bda162.85387937@news.sf.sbcglobal.net...
    >> On Wed, 08 Dec 2004 10:41:16 +0000, Chris Cole
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 21:09:35 +0000, DEMAINE Benoit-Pierre wrote:
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >And why exactly do you feel it's reasonable to ask complete strangers to
    >> >'mark' your work? What recompense do we get for helping you present

    >*your*
    >> >thesis? You're either very arrogant or very stupid.
    >> >HTH
    >> >Chris.

    >>
    >> Ha ha.
    >>
    >> I agree with you. The "favor" the guy was asking
    >> is equivalent to asking someone to come to your
    >> house and install a new roof. And oh by the way,
    >> "I'm in a hurry" to have this done.
    >>
    >> This reminds me of an E-mail I received from a guy
    >> in China. He said he liked the articles in my
    >> "DSP Tips & Tricks" column of the IEEE Signal
    >> Processing magazine. Then he asked me to send
    >> him an electronic copy of all the articles
    >> ever published in the column!
    >>
    >> Now "that takes nerve", as we say.
    >>
    >> Ha ha.
    >> [-Rick-]


    Hi Rufus,

    I enjoyed your thoughtful post.

    >Does every word out of your mouths or every key pressed
    >come with a click charge? Jeez. you guys!


    Darn, I've never heard that phrase "click charge"
    before so I'm not rightly sure of its true meaning.
    I'm guessing that you're implying that the
    "you guys" (which includes me) are not often
    willing to help upon request.

    This newsgroup, I believe, is the most helpful
    group of guys I've ever encountered. Of course that's
    just my opinion.

    >There really are some people who genuinely enjoy helping other
    >people out, without need for reward other than the mental exercise
    >or ego boost.


    You bet. And I do try to be one of those "people."
    But it's not always so pleasant. A guy once asked me to review
    a manuscript for an article he was gonna submit to the
    Embedded System's Programming magazine. I spent two hours
    going through his material making corrections and providing
    suggestions on how he might make the material more clear and
    readable. I even created a few drawings for him that I thought
    would improve the information content of his article.
    Upon sending him my review comments/suggestions, he didn't
    reply to thank me. A week later I e-mailed him and asked if he'd
    received my comments. That was his opportunity to thank me
    for my efforts, but the jerk never did. Can ya' imagine?

    Some years ago I received a request for a PDF file of a
    quadrature processing tutorial article that I had written.
    I sent the guy the PDF, only to learn some months later that
    he stole four figures from my article and pasted them
    in his company report that he had written. His report did
    *NOT* acknowledge me as the source of those figures.
    That is clearly dishonest.

    A couple of years ago mechanical engineering instructor
    E-mailed me requesting electronic files of several figures
    from my DSP book. He wanted to use them in his training
    class he conducts for the Applied Technology Institute.
    I told him he'd have to contact my publisher because the
    publisher owns those figures, not me. He got back to me
    complaining that the publisher wanted over $100 to allow him to
    use the figures he desired. So what did knucklehead Rick do?
    I took the time to redraw those figures maintaining their
    information content, but making them look different enough
    so as not to commit a copyright violation. After sending
    the files for the new figures to the instructor, I never
    heard from this ill-mannered clown again. No he did not
    die--he's still teaching his class.

    >Perhaps there are people who, in the process of critiquing the thesis,
    >would get information out of it applicable to their own work. I started
    >to read it with this in mind but was put off immediately by the spelling and
    >grammar errors in the first few paragraphs. Anyone writing a thesis
    >should be able to run a quick spell check. But that's not the point.


    Ha. I too started to read his material but after the
    first page I experienced blurred vision, and began
    suffering from severe abdominal pain. I had to stop reading.

    >The only valid complaints might be the tenor of the requests, which
    >perhaps did sound arrogant and demanding, but that could be a cultural
    >difference or a simple error in translation.


    "Cultural difference" or not, every culture has the words
    "please" and "thank you", don't they? Although I wasn't
    offended by his post. (I wonder if he's read this thread?)

    >And Rick, so what if someone asked for an electronic copy of "Tips
    >and Tricks"??? As far as anyone knows, that could be a mouse
    >click (or two) away for you! That would not be too much to ask, would it?


    Well, now whoa. Wait a minute! Four things:

    (1) That guy should have asked, "Rick, how can I get
    copies of all the Tips&Tricks articles?" He should have
    made some small effort, himself, in solving his problem.

    (2) "... a mouse click (or two) away"! No way!
    I don't have electronic copies of all the Tips&Tricks
    articles published over the last two years.
    I don't know who would, except maybe in the
    archives of the Typesetting people who work for the
    IEEE. My copies of those articles are the
    printed magazine issues themselves.

    (3) My sending electronic copies of any material whose
    copyright is owned by the IEEE is dishonest at best,
    and probably illegal.

    (4) I do have electronic copies of the articles I wrote but
    I've suffered so much with stinkin' rats plagiarizing
    my work, over the years, that I'm now super "gun shy" about
    supplying electronic versions of my work to anyone. So
    being the paranoid, suspicious, guy that I am I thought,
    if this guy has read some of the Tips&Tricks articles then
    he must have access to issues of the printed magazine.
    Then I asked myself, "Why, in the name of Sweet Merciful
    Jesus, would he want electronic copies of the articles?"
    I'll let you answer that question.

    >Lighten Up, Fellas!


    Ha ha. If I was any lighter, I'd float away.

    >Rufus


    Again Rufus, I enjoyed your post. Thanks.
    Merry Christmas.
    [-Rick-]



  8. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals withembedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

    (Rick Lyons).

    Hi Rick,

    > This newsgroup, I believe, is the most helpful
    > group of guys I've ever encountered.


    Uh oh ; which newsgroup are you speaking of right now ? This message
    is posted in... oh, I think I can count 7 newsgroups. I feel sure the
    thread started with 8 of them.

    > "Cultural difference" or not, every culture has the words
    > "please" and "thank you", don't they? Although I wasn't
    > offended by his post.


    You bet.

    Please, would you exclude the group fr.sci.maths from future
    crossposting in this thread ? The fr.* hierarchy is french
    speaking. Thank you in advance!

    I have been asking this several times this last days. I subscribed
    temporarily to one of the english speaking groups in the list, namely
    comp.dsp, to be able to read answers to this request.

    > (I wonder if he's read this thread?)


    I did, and I enjoyed a lot the humour of some messages. But that's not
    my point right now..,

  9. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals with embedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )


    "Rick Lyons" wrote in message
    news:41bee586.168368500@news.sf.sbcglobal.net...
    > On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 11:17:08 -0500, "Rufus V. Smith"
    > wrote:
    >
    > Hi Rufus,
    >
    > I enjoyed your thoughtful post.
    >
    > >Does every word out of your mouths or every key pressed
    > >come with a click charge? Jeez. you guys!

    >
    > Darn, I've never heard that phrase "click charge"
    > before so I'm not rightly sure of its true meaning.


    It comes from working on mailroom equipment in a prior
    life where the high-speed xerox printers had a "click" charge
    for each sheet or image printed, in addition to regular
    maintenance agreements.

    > I'm guessing that you're implying that the
    > "you guys" (which includes me) are not often
    > willing to help upon request.


    It was directed at you and Chris, but also broader, to that
    class of people who won't talk to you until you supply a
    credit card number. A group I don't believe you belong to
    now.

    > >There really are some people who genuinely enjoy helping other
    > >people out, without need for reward other than the mental exercise
    > >or ego boost.

    >
    > You bet. And I do try to be one of those "people."
    > But it's not always so pleasant...


    > A guy once asked me to review
    > a manuscript for an article he was gonna submit...

    ....
    > Upon sending him my review comments/suggestions, he didn't
    > reply to thank me. A week later I e-mailed him and asked if he'd
    > received my comments. That was his opportunity to thank me
    > for my efforts, but the jerk never did. Can ya' imagine?


    < additional examples snipped >

    People who don't give proper attribution, or even minimal
    gratitude, should be slapped. At least.

    > >And Rick, so what if someone asked for an electronic copy of "Tips
    > >and Tricks"??? As far as anyone knows, that could be a mouse
    > >click (or two) away for you! That would not be too much to ask, would

    it?
    >
    > Well, now whoa. Wait a minute! Four things:
    >

    < (1)impertinence of request, (2) availability of materials,
    (3) legal issues, (4) dubious intent snipped>

    The request was certainly impertinent. I could see that even if you had
    a "url" or isbn #, that you might be disinclined to provide it at that
    point.

    (I have the occasional scar from being helpful, too. Now I
    appreciate your position better)

    >
    > >Rufus

    >
    > Again Rufus, I enjoyed your post. Thanks.
    > Merry Christmas.
    > [-Rick-]
    >


    Merry Christmas to you too Rick.

    (and all other lurkers enjoy your holidays, whatever they may be)



  10. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals withembedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

    Rick Lyons wrote:
    > On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 21:09:35 +0000, DEMAINE Benoit-Pierre
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    >>Hash: SHA1
    >>
    >>I have released the first full version of my thesis. I am looking for
    >>rereaders to track syntax and phrasing problems.
    >>
    >>The reader is expected to try to understand what I wrote, and report any
    >>problem.
    >>

    >
    > (snipped)
    >
    >>Like every one, I am in hurry; so please just mail me and tell me how
    >>much time it will take to read it all.
    >>
    >>PS : one part is still missing. It will say the same thing as the web
    >>page, but in the PDF.
    >>
    >>Many thanks for any help.
    >>- --

    >
    >
    > Wow! You're asking for a favor that will take
    > hours and hours!
    >
    > I suggest, first, you run a "Spellchecker" on
    > your text. A reader will forgive a misspelled word
    > now and then, but *not* twenty misspellings per page
    > is *VERY* unpleasant to read!
    >
    > Next, and here's the hard part, you need someone
    > (called a "copy editor") to go through
    > your material and correct all the English grammar
    > mistakes. This effort will take 10-20 hours
    > (though I'm strictly guessing) because I'd say
    > 60%-80% of your sentences require corrections, and
    > your thesis is roughly 70 pages.
    >
    > Copy editors (usually) charge 25$-50$ per hour.
    > If you have a friend, maybe they'll "edit" your
    > material for free. But friends like that are
    > difficult to find.
    >
    > Search the Internet for "copy editor hire".
    >
    > Your idea to include photos in your thesis seems
    > like a good idea to me.
    >
    > Good Luck,
    > [-Rick-]
    >

    All of this discussion skirts the one fundamental underpinning of what
    most educators in the US assigns to academic theses, whether they be
    Masters or PhD (most certainly PhD): This is to be a demonstration of
    an ability to generate AND summarize original work. If you cannot do
    both than you have not EARNED the degree to which you aspire. Edited
    and or co-authoring work is for the publication in journals other than
    dissertation abstracts.

  11. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals withembedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

    You english syntax is somewhat laboured. I suggest having a technically
    oriented English speaker rewrite the document. I would do it for 20
    dollars per page, 50% payable in advance. No, I am not kidding. That is
    dirt cheap. It could take up to an hour per page to make the language
    comply with academic technical standards.

    EC<:-}

    DEMAINE Benoit-Pierre wrote:
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > I have released the first full version of my thesis. I am looking for
    > rereaders to track syntax and phrasing problems.
    >
    > The reader is expected to try to understand what I wrote, and report any
    > problem.
    >

    In short. it deals with building a camera WHICH HAS THE CAPABILITY OF
    TRACKING
    any object. I had to build a USB development board based on the motorola
    MC68HC908JB8,
    write the monitor to upload the firmware under Linux, write the
    firmware FOR THE MOTOROLA "PROCESSOR", write the user application THAT
    PROCESSED THE
    CAMERA INPUT, compute INTERPRETED MOVEMENT IN THE VIRTUAL FIELD
    GENERATED BY THE INPUT,
    and PRODUCE INSTRUCTIONS FOR the USB board to OPERATE the servo motors
    ACTUATING the
    camera.

    # The above might sound a little stilted but colloquial language is not
    allowed in a thesis.

    EC<:-}


  12. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals withembedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

    Where you will get the most help...and I am sure you have thought
    of this, is in a Canadian board, where Fr. speaking people who are
    also fluently bilingual sympathize with your translational plight
    and decide to take pity on you sufficient for their engagement in such
    an ardous task as rewriting 70 pages of a document. This is a week's
    work to get it write. (find the error in the last sentence)

    comme ca -->

    http://www.siliconinvestor.com/subje...ubjectid=28756

    Another idea is to get a chinese thesis advisor whose english is so
    bad he won't notice the mistakes. It has worked for me.

    EC<:-]

    DEMAINE Benoit-Pierre wrote:
    >> I still think you should get an english major to look at it.
    >> Preferrably a really good looking one in your preference of gender.
    >> Reward him/her by taking him/her out to dinner -- perhaps oysters with
    >> lots and lots of wine. Then suggest that you need to go back to your
    >> room to take another look. Then discover that you just happen to have
    >> some champaign stashed away.
    >>
    >> The rest is up to you, but remember: a good engineer kills two birds
    >> with one stone.

    >
    >
    > Your two peaces of advice are quiet interesting, but I definitively can
    > not follow any of them at the moment.
    >
    >
    >



  13. Re: Student looking for re-readers for his thesis ( it deals withembedded system, USB, Linux, microcontrolers, firmwares ... )

    This will be really hard to correct. E.G."I expect some difficulties
    about use of the clock" corrects to "I expect some difficulty [] with
    use of the [] clock" It is easy to substitute, but is this correct? What
    clock? You have a dangling reference. It is bad style, while
    grammatically correct. Never assume that your thesis advisor knows a
    grandfather clock from a MPU clock. [] must be filled in with
    description or phrases that explain the terse phraseology.

    "The last problem is to make everything work (chip+servos) only
    consuming 500 MA as peak current."

    One can see what you want to say.

    "Finally the challenge is make the all components work, inclusive of
    chips and servos, while only consuming a maximum of 500MA peak current."

    Actually one does not consume peak current. One "reaches a level of
    consumption that maximizes at [or does not exceed] a peak current of
    500MA". The verb consume is active continuous in mood, whilst a peak
    current usage is perforce transitory. Thus the meaning of the phrase is
    corrupted.

    The work of making this document correct and fluid is not trivial. Good
    goddamned luck with it. It is not for amateurs.

    EC<:-}

    DEMAINE Benoit-Pierre wrote:
    >> I still think you should get an english major to look at it.
    >> Preferrably a really good looking one in your preference of gender.
    >> Reward him/her by taking him/her out to dinner -- perhaps oysters with
    >> lots and lots of wine. Then suggest that you need to go back to your
    >> room to take another look. Then discover that you just happen to have
    >> some champaign stashed away.
    >>
    >> The rest is up to you, but remember: a good engineer kills two birds
    >> with one stone.

    >
    >
    > Your two peaces of advice are quiet interesting, but I definitively can
    > not follow any of them at the moment.
    >
    >
    >



+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3