Please Recommend Good Linux Books Talking as much and thoroughly as possible - Questions

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Thread: Please Recommend Good Linux Books Talking as much and thoroughly as possible

  1. Please Recommend Good Linux Books Talking as much and thoroughly as possible

    Hello

    I have been using Linux for quite a while and I am trying to learn as much
    as possible by reading books.

    I would like to read complete books not just covering one linux distro but
    common things in all of them that probably were carried over from unix. By
    this I mean not mainly unix but materials that will make be capable of
    dealing with almost any distro.

    I would like the books to include one of the following:

    1- Linux & Unix Commands(Specially those that are very useful).
    2- Linux Networking & Firewall(Iptables).
    3- Backing up.
    4- Setup Important applications(Samba,Apache,Postfix or any MTA,etc).
    5- Scripting(Awk, Sed, Perl).
    6- Kernel Compiling & Hacking.
    7- Linux Security.
    8- NFS
    9- NIS
    10-SNMP & Network Centralized Managment.
    11- Anything I missed that helps for the Certification and would prepare
    m to help other persons in these groups.

    I have Running Linux 3rd edition, Linux in a nutshell. I would like to
    hear about the best of the best.

    Thanks for your time,

    IvŠn C. Filpo

  2. Re: Please Recommend Good Linux Books Talking as much and thoroughlyas possible

    On 10/15/04 07:04, IvŠn Filpo wrote:
    > I have been using Linux for quite a while and I am trying to learn as much
    > as possible by reading books.
    >
    > I would like to read complete books not just covering one linux distro but
    > common things in all of them that probably were carried over from unix. By
    > this I mean not mainly unix but materials that will make be capable of
    > dealing with almost any distro.


    Andrew Anderson et el - /Linux Network Administrators' Guide/, This and
    a second edition of this book cover all essential topics related to
    setup, selection, installation and administration of LAN/WAN's, a must
    for UNIX/Linux network and even system administrators.

    B. Scott Burkett, Sven Goldt, John D. Harper, Sven van der Meer, and
    Matt Welsh - /Linux Programmers Guide/, This book covers topics of
    interest to people who wish to develop application software for Linux.

    David A. Rusling - /The Linux Kernel/, This book provides an
    introduction to the Linux Kernel, how it is constructed, and how it
    works. Take a tour of your kernel. The Linux Kernel Module Programming Guide

    Ori Pomerantz - /The Linux Kernel Module Programming Guide/, This guide
    explains how to write Linux kernel modules.

    Lamb, Linda and Arnold Robbins - /Learning the vi Editor/, O'Reilly &
    Associates, 1998, ISBN 1-56592-426-6, an excellent book on learning all
    the capabilities and methods for using the vi text editor.

    Newham, Cameron, and Rosenblatt - /Learning the Bash Shell/, O'Reilly &
    Associates, 1998, ISBN 1-56592-347-2, privides you skills to learn
    editing the command line and for writing bash script including operating
    and programming in a bash environment.

    Brian W. Kernighan and Rob Pike - /The Unix Programming Environment/,
    Prentice Hall, 1984, ISBN 0-13-937681-X (paperback),
    http://cm.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/upe/

    Frisch, AeLeen - /Essential System Administration/, O'Reilly &
    Associates, 1995, ISBN 1-56592-127-5, this book privides many of the
    basics required for using UNIX or UNIX like operating systems, commands,
    file systems and so forth.

    Andrew S Tanenbaum - /Operating Systems: Design and Implementation, 2e/,
    Prentice Hall, 1997, ISBN 0-13-638677-6, This book offers a unique and
    carefully integrated combination of principles and practice. While the
    usual principles are covered in detail, the book also describes a small,
    but real UNIX-like operating system: MINIX. It shows how it works and
    illustrates the principles behind it. By using MINIX, students learn
    principles and then can apply them in hands-on system design projects.

    Andrew S Tanenbaum - /Modern Operating Systems, 2e/, Prentice Hall,
    2001, ISBN 0-13-031358-0, This widely anticipated revision of a
    worldwide best seller incorporates the latest developments in operating
    systems technologies and contains complete chapters on computer
    security, multimedia operating systems, Windows 2000, and operating
    system design.

    --
    Dr Balwinder Singh Dheeman Registered Linux User: #229709
    CLLO (Chief Linux Learning Officer) Machines: #168573, 170593, 259192
    Anu's Linux@HOME Distros: Knoppix, Fedora, FreeBSD
    More: http://anu.homelinux.net/~bsd/ Visit: http://counter.li.org/

  3. Re: Please Recommend Good Linux Books Talking as much and thoroughly as possible

    In article ,
    IvŠn Filpo writes:
    >
    >
    > Hello
    >
    > I have been using Linux for quite a while and I am trying to learn as much
    > as possible by reading books.
    >
    > I would like to read complete books not just covering one linux distro but
    > common things in all of them that probably were carried over from unix. By
    > this I mean not mainly unix but materials that will make be capable of
    > dealing with almost any distro.
    >
    > I would like the books to include one of the following:
    >
    > 1- Linux & Unix Commands(Specially those that are very useful).
    > 2- Linux Networking & Firewall(Iptables).
    > 3- Backing up.
    > 4- Setup Important applications(Samba,Apache,Postfix or any MTA,etc).
    > 5- Scripting(Awk, Sed, Perl).
    > 6- Kernel Compiling & Hacking.
    > 7- Linux Security.
    > 8- NFS
    > 9- NIS
    > 10-SNMP & Network Centralized Managment.
    > 11- Anything I missed that helps for the Certification and would prepare
    > m to help other persons in these groups.


    First, you refer to "the Certification," but you don't say what
    certification exam(s) you intend to take. Most have books available for
    them, so you might consider starting there.

    Second, no one book will cover all of these topics in detail. To take
    general Linux subjects a bit beyond the basics, my own _Linux Power Tools_
    may be a good start, but beyond that, you're into topic-specific books
    (kernel books, security books, Samba books, Apache books, etc.). I've got
    a few recommendations (including some by me) at:

    http://www.rodsbooks.com/books/

    I don't have specific recommendations for many of the specific topics you
    mention, though. I also haven't kept these lists as up to date as
    possible, so they omit most title published in the last couple of years.
    Still, it might help you a bit.

    --
    Rod Smith, rodsmith@rodsbooks.com
    http://www.rodsbooks.com
    Author of books on Linux, FreeBSD, and networking

  4. Re: Please Recommend Good Linux Books Talking as much and thoroughlyas possible

    On 10/19/04 22:43, Rod Smith wrote:
    > In article ,


    [snip]

    > First, you refer to "the Certification," but you don't say what
    > certification exam(s) you intend to take. Most have books available for
    > them, so you might consider starting there.
    >
    > Second, no one book will cover all of these topics in detail. To take

    The OP also posted this question to comp.os.linux.misc and someone
    already recommeded: http://www.icon.co.za/~psheer/book/ to OP and to one
    more such query.

    This book is a must-read it is very thorough, probably one of the most.
    Is basically in all the libraries and the book comes with the electronic
    version of it as well on cd.

    This the the RUTE document, version 1.0. RUTE is Rute Users Tutorial
    and Exposition, a recursive acronmym. It is certainly one of the best
    tutorials out there.

    But it is also a curriculum, and as such, is even more powerful. Use it
    as a course of study, and your knowledge of Linux will be enough to
    allow you to recognize and make use of the really advanced material out
    there. That's the stuff that (some of) the contributing experts have
    learnt.

    Highly recommended!

    /All above are, but excerputs from other posters/.

    *Rute*: One Linux book for all purposes!

    No need to get confused over other books. Should I say anything more?

    > general Linux subjects a bit beyond the basics, my own _Linux Power Tools_
    > may be a good start, but beyond that, you're into topic-specific books
    > (kernel books, security books, Samba books, Apache books, etc.). I've got
    > a few recommendations (including some by me) at:
    >
    > http://www.rodsbooks.com/books/
    >
    > I don't have specific recommendations for many of the specific topics you
    > mention, though. I also haven't kept these lists as up to date as
    > possible, so they omit most title published in the last couple of years.
    > Still, it might help you a bit.


    --
    Dr Balwinder Singh Dheeman Registered Linux User: #229709
    CLLO (Chief Linux Learning Officer) Machines: #168573, 170593, 259192
    Anu's Linux@HOME Distros: Knoppix, Fedora, FreeBSD
    More: http://anu.homelinux.net/~bsd/ Visit: http://counter.li.org/

  5. Re: Please Recommend Good Linux Books Talking as much and thoroughlyas possible

    IvŠn Filpo wrote:

    >Hello
    >
    >I have been using Linux for quite a while and I am trying to learn as much
    >as possible by reading books.
    >
    >I would like to read complete books not just covering one linux distro but
    >common things in all of them that probably were carried over from unix. By
    >this I mean not mainly unix but materials that will make be capable of
    >dealing with almost any distro.
    >
    >I would like the books to include one of the following:
    >
    > 1- Linux & Unix Commands(Specially those that are very useful).
    > 2- Linux Networking & Firewall(Iptables).
    > 3- Backing up.
    > 4- Setup Important applications(Samba,Apache,Postfix or any MTA,etc).
    > 5- Scripting(Awk, Sed, Perl).
    > 6- Kernel Compiling & Hacking.
    > 7- Linux Security.
    > 8- NFS
    > 9- NIS
    > 10-SNMP & Network Centralized Managment.
    > 11- Anything I missed that helps for the Certification and would prepare
    > m to help other persons in these groups.
    >
    >I have Running Linux 3rd edition, Linux in a nutshell. I would like to
    >hear about the best of the best.
    >
    >Thanks for your time,
    >
    >IvŠn C. Filpo
    >
    >

    Ivan,
    Reviewing earlier replies seems like you will be snuggled up this winter
    reading. For some this is their way. For me it was not. I found using
    Slackware forced me to remember where things were and how things were
    done. When I got a job running computers I learned more and when I
    taught I learned even more. Whatever administration book turns your
    crank will be your best first book. Then try to keep everything you do
    general. A bit hard to do with a BSD oriented platform but they do a
    darn good job of it in trying to be SVR4 as well. Then, I suggest
    buying 1 or 2 used machines and begin networking them. Fiddle the
    boards to make each box efficient as to access and convertibility. Make
    your primary machine the router and as you acquire new hw migrate the
    old stuff down to the other machines.
    IPTABLEs is not for the beginner. LEARN the commands FIRST. PRACTICE
    USING SCRIPTING, use sed, awk, bash and TclTK. After 2 years u'll be
    ready for the big show. No kidding on the scripting -- he who scripts
    rules!! he who scripts best is the most valuable tool in the shed!!

    I think if you learn in the following order you will find things build
    on each other:
    scripting
    backups (built from your own scripts using CDs)
    kernel building
    networking (NSF NIS SNMP)
    now IPTABLES

    Notice I did not mention perl. It is (at least to me) a vile language
    because it is not very self documenting (scripting can be if you don't
    try to be cryptic). It is used (IMHO) because managers have heard it is
    multiplatform and fast. Believe me I have astounded many managers.
    Learn it if you like but I suggest you have a plate full before you get
    there.

    Suggestion!!! Get to a university or community college and take their
    courses. Skip the certifications they are useful to get in the door
    for job apps but unless you are already financially endowed you will be
    coughing up another grand every year to stay certified. Also my
    experience with certification courses is that they teach to the test not
    for knowledge. Again believe me, I've taught there.

    One thing too that you might try. Join a computer user group where you
    live. You may become the GURU quickly. I never did that but it seems
    to me a mistake I made.

    RAZ

  6. Re: Please Recommend Good Linux Books Talking as much and thoroughly as possible

    Check out misc.books.technical


    Razzel wrote:

    > IvŠn Filpo wrote:
    >
    >>Hello
    >>
    >>I have been using Linux for quite a while and I am trying to learn as much
    >>as possible by reading books.
    >>
    >>I would like to read complete books not just covering one linux distro but
    >>common things in all of them that probably were carried over from unix. By
    >>this I mean not mainly unix but materials that will make be capable of
    >>dealing with almost any distro.
    >>
    >>I would like the books to include one of the following:
    >>
    >>1- Linux & Unix Commands(Specially those that are very useful).
    >>2- Linux Networking & Firewall(Iptables).
    >>3- Backing up.
    >>4- Setup Important applications(Samba,Apache,Postfix or any MTA,etc).
    >>5- Scripting(Awk, Sed, Perl).
    >>6- Kernel Compiling & Hacking.
    >>7- Linux Security.
    >>8- NFS
    >>9- NIS
    >>10-SNMP & Network Centralized Managment.
    >>11- Anything I missed that helps for the Certification and would prepare
    >>m to help other persons in these groups.
    >>
    >>I have Running Linux 3rd edition, Linux in a nutshell. I would like to
    >>hear about the best of the best.
    >>
    >>Thanks for your time,
    >>
    >>IvŠn C. Filpo
    >>
    >>

    > Ivan,
    > Reviewing earlier replies seems like you will be snuggled up this winter
    > reading. For some this is their way. For me it was not. I found using
    > Slackware forced me to remember where things were and how things were
    > done. When I got a job running computers I learned more and when I
    > taught I learned even more. Whatever administration book turns your
    > crank will be your best first book. Then try to keep everything you do
    > general. A bit hard to do with a BSD oriented platform but they do a
    > darn good job of it in trying to be SVR4 as well. Then, I suggest
    > buying 1 or 2 used machines and begin networking them. Fiddle the
    > boards to make each box efficient as to access and convertibility. Make
    > your primary machine the router and as you acquire new hw migrate the
    > old stuff down to the other machines.
    > IPTABLEs is not for the beginner. LEARN the commands FIRST. PRACTICE
    > USING SCRIPTING, use sed, awk, bash and TclTK. After 2 years u'll be
    > ready for the big show. No kidding on the scripting -- he who scripts
    > rules!! he who scripts best is the most valuable tool in the shed!!
    >
    > I think if you learn in the following order you will find things build
    > on each other:
    > scripting
    > backups (built from your own scripts using CDs)
    > kernel building
    > networking (NSF NIS SNMP)
    > now IPTABLES
    >
    > Notice I did not mention perl. It is (at least to me) a vile language
    > because it is not very self documenting (scripting can be if you don't
    > try to be cryptic). It is used (IMHO) because managers have heard it is
    > multiplatform and fast. Believe me I have astounded many managers.
    > Learn it if you like but I suggest you have a plate full before you get
    > there.
    >
    > Suggestion!!! Get to a university or community college and take their
    > courses. Skip the certifications they are useful to get in the door
    > for job apps but unless you are already financially endowed you will be
    > coughing up another grand every year to stay certified. Also my
    > experience with certification courses is that they teach to the test not
    > for knowledge. Again believe me, I've taught there.
    >
    > One thing too that you might try. Join a computer user group where you
    > live. You may become the GURU quickly. I never did that but it seems
    > to me a mistake I made.
    >
    > RAZ




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