a good Linux System Admin book - Questions

This is a discussion on a good Linux System Admin book - Questions ; Hi all, Can anyone recommend me a good Linux System Admin book? I consider myself a beginner in system administration, I know the fundamental concepts. I had a look at the following on amazon: Linux Administration Handbook Linux in a ...

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  1. a good Linux System Admin book

    Hi all,

    Can anyone recommend me a good Linux System Admin book? I consider myself a
    beginner in system administration, I know the fundamental concepts.

    I had a look at the following on amazon:

    Linux Administration Handbook
    Linux in a Nutshell
    Linux Cookbook

    I want a tutorial style book with examples etc.

    Can anyone tell me which one would be the ideal book to buy, also if there
    is an online alternative that would be great as well.

    Thanks
    Yousaf
    --
    Red Hat 9 (Shrike)
    Linux version 2.4.20-8
    gcc version 3.2.2

  2. Re: a good Linux System Admin book

    In article , Yousaf wrote:
    >Can anyone recommend me a good Linux System Admin book?


    "a" book??? There are fifteen books between the monitors in front
    of me, and another bookcase behind me with eleven additional books
    on *nix, nevermind the system manuals, etc.

    >I consider myself a beginner in system administration, I know the
    >fundamental concepts.


    OK - have you started with the free stuff at the Linux Documentation
    Project? Look at http://tldp.org/guides.html

    There is a huge amount of stuff in the 470+ different HOWTOs.

    >I had a look at the following on amazon:
    >
    >Linux Administration Handbook
    >Linux in a Nutshell


    I have the nutshell, but it's not a learning book. It assumes you already
    know the command, and want to quickly check syntax. In theory, it's not
    much better than the man pages, though I would be inconvenienced without
    it.

    >Linux Cookbook


    I was never thrilled with 'cookbook' style books. Most that I've tried
    have been lacking the substance.

    >I want a tutorial style book with examples etc.


    The one I learned on was 'Essential System Administration' by Aeleen Frisch
    from O'Reilly. Actually, most of the books I have are from them. See
    www.oreilly.com. A close second as a good publisher is Addison Wesley.

    >Can anyone tell me which one would be the ideal book to buy


    1. Which is the ideal ice cream? Think about that.
    2. There is no single book that does it all. There _can't_ be. Just doing
    a page count on the HOWTOs gives 11,900 equivalent pages. I wouldn't
    even hazard a guess how much material is in the man pages.

    >also if there is an online alternative that would be great as well.


    See above. One suggestion - whenever you do something new, or even
    something that you are going to need to reuse in one form or another,
    WRITE IT DOWN - stick it in a file or something. Include some comments
    so you know why you did what.

    [compton ~]$ wc -l scripts
    1099 scripts
    [compton ~]$

    I have no idea if I'll ever reuse everything that I've stuck into that
    file - but it's there if I need it. Things like:

    [compton ~]$ ls `echo $PATH | tr ':' ' '` | wc -l
    1310
    [compton ~]$ echo $HISTSIZE
    1000
    [compton ~]$ history | sed 's/^......//' | tr '|' '\n' | sed 's/^ *//' |
    cut -d' ' -f1 | sort -u | wc -l
    75
    [compton ~]$

    TRANSLATION: There are about 1300 commands in my path. My shell remembers
    the last 1000 commands. In this terminal, of the last 1000 commands I've
    used (and the line beginning with 'history' and ending with 'wc -l' is
    considered one command by the history, although it contains seven different
    commands chained together), I've used just 75 different commands , (For
    root, the last I checked, it was about 85 out of 1630.)

    >Red Hat 9 (Shrike)
    >Linux version 2.4.20-8


    That hasn't been updated since it got out of the box. There have been
    eight kernel updates _alone_ from RH. If you are going to be keeping
    that system much longer, I'd make sure to hit the RH errata site while
    they still _have_ the errata available (they may disappear at the end
    of October). Also, download.fedoralegacy.org has _SOME_ additional
    errata (two were released yesterday).

    I see you posted an identical article to alt.os.linux. Please don't
    multipost - if you MUST post to more than one group, include all of
    the newsgroups in the 'Newsgroups:' header, separating them with a
    comma. That way, people only have to download one copy of your post.

    Old guy

  3. Re: a good Linux System Admin book

    Moe Trin wrote:

    >
    > I see you posted an identical article to alt.os.linux. Please don't
    > multipost - if you MUST post to more than one group, include all of
    > the newsgroups in the 'Newsgroups:' header, separating them with a
    > comma. That way, people only have to download one copy of your post.



    Sorry, I always thought that putting all the newsgroup names in the header
    is multiposting! Well there you go, you learn something new every day.

    Thanks for the detailed reply, I have already downloaded a few books from
    tldp site. I must admit that it is a wonderful site with all the
    information I need to begin with.

    I am awaiting a stable Fedora release, by stable I mean with a stable 2.6
    kernel. For me it will be stable when it reaches 2.6.15 or higher.

    Yousaf
    --
    Red Hat 9 (Shrike)
    Linux version 2.4.20-8
    gcc version 3.2.2

  4. Re: a good Linux System Admin book

    In article <-sydnd_Bc9qFjsDcRVn-gw@eclipse.net.uk>, Yousaf wrote:
    >I always thought that putting all the newsgroup names in the header
    >is multiposting!


    No, all in one (no more than five, or you wind up in killfiles as a
    spammer) is called 'cross-posting'. Within limits, that's OK, and is
    always preferred to posting the same article individually in multiple
    groups - hence the name 'multi-post'.

    >I have already downloaded a few books from tldp site. I must admit that
    >it is a wonderful site with all the information I need to begin with.


    The material there is actually pretty good, too. I've been using *nix
    for a long time, and yet I am learning new tricks from TheGrendal's
    abs-guide.

    >I am awaiting a stable Fedora release, by stable I mean with a stable 2.6
    >kernel. For me it will be stable when it reaches 2.6.15 or higher.


    [compton ~]$ finger kernel@kernel.org
    [kernel.org]
    The latest stable version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.8.1
    The latest prepatch for the stable Linux kernel tree is: 2.6.9-rc3
    The latest snapshot for the stable Linux kernel tree is: 2.6.9-rc3-bk1
    The latest 2.4 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.4.27
    The latest prepatch for the 2.4 Linux kernel tree is: 2.4.28-pre3
    The latest snapshot for the 2.4 Linux kernel tree is: 2.4.28-pre3-bk6
    The latest 2.2 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.2.26
    The latest prepatch for the 2.2 Linux kernel tree is: 2.2.27-pre2
    The latest 2.0 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.0.40
    The latest -mm patch to the stable Linux kernels is: 2.6.9-rc2-mm4
    [compton ~]$

    You _may_ have a bit of a wait. And don't forget that 1.0 only went up
    to 1.0.9 (although there was a 1.0.pl15), and 1.2 stopped at 1.2.13
    before 2.0 took over. Remember that 2.6.x has been out since last
    December. Yes, I do have some systems running 2.0.40 - why do you
    ask? ;-) Actually, a better indication of "stable" might be when
    2.7.0 is announced. It's taking longer than I expected.

    Old guy


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