"Distributed" vs "Decentralized systems" - Questions

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Thread: "Distributed" vs "Decentralized systems"

  1. "Distributed" vs "Decentralized systems"

    What is the difference between distributed and decentralized systems?



  2. Re: "Distributed" vs "Decentralized systems"

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    dd wrote:
    > What is the difference between distributed and decentralized systems?


    As I understand it, a distributed system consists of a single component
    that provides a service, and one or more external system that access the
    service. Think of this as a hub and spoke design, where the hub is the
    central service and the endpoints of the spokes are the external systems.

    OTOH, a decentralized system consists of many external systems that talk
    to each other. Think of this as a fishing net design, where each knot
    represents an independant system, and the lines between the knots
    represent the communications channels between systems.

    The difference is that with a distributed system (as above), if you
    break the hub, you break the system. OTOH, if you break one of the
    systems in a decentralized system, you've only lost one element, and not
    the whole system.

    - --

    Lew Pitcher, IT Consultant, Enterprise Application Architecture
    Enterprise Technology Solutions, TD Bank Financial Group

    (Opinions expressed here are my own, not my employer's)
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  3. Re: "Distributed" vs "Decentralized systems"

    dd wrote:

    > What is the difference between distributed and decentralized systems?


    If I used the terms distinctively, I'd used them both to mean "a network of
    nodes, each running some part of a problem on its CPU." Then a "distributed"
    system is one where I can find a single node, remove it, and disable the
    entire system. A "decentralized" system would not have a center, so removing
    any node could not affect the others. It might still affect the total
    result.

    What context did you hear the words?

    --
    Phlip
    http://industrialxp.org/community/bi...UserInterfaces



  4. Re: "Distributed" vs "Decentralized systems"

    In article <414b0a12$0$20127$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>,
    wrote:
    >What is the difference between distributed and decentralized systems?


    Six of one, half-dozen of the other.

    --bks


  5. Re: "Distributed" vs "Decentralized systems"

    I think of a distributed system as one where the functionality
    *depends* on more than one node performing, ie there is no
    single/central node/server which provides the functionality. To me
    this implies *spread* of functionality.

    A decentralised system (I'd say) is one where the performance does
    not depend on a single/central node/server. Multiple regional
    mirrors might be used to achieve this, but it is not necessarily
    'distributed'.

    The difference is subtle and the terms are probably used more or
    less interchangeably by many.

    Andrew

    Lew Pitcher wrote:

    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > dd wrote:
    >
    >>What is the difference between distributed and decentralized systems?

    >
    >
    > As I understand it, a distributed system consists of a single component
    > that provides a service, and one or more external system that access the
    > service. Think of this as a hub and spoke design, where the hub is the
    > central service and the endpoints of the spokes are the external systems.
    >
    > OTOH, a decentralized system consists of many external systems that talk
    > to each other. Think of this as a fishing net design, where each knot
    > represents an independant system, and the lines between the knots
    > represent the communications channels between systems.
    >
    > The difference is that with a distributed system (as above), if you
    > break the hub, you break the system. OTOH, if you break one of the
    > systems in a decentralized system, you've only lost one element, and not
    > the whole system.
    >
    > - --
    >
    > Lew Pitcher, IT Consultant, Enterprise Application Architecture
    > Enterprise Technology Solutions, TD Bank Financial Group
    >
    > (Opinions expressed here are my own, not my employer's)
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    > Version: GnuPG v1.2.4 (MingW32)
    >
    > iD8DBQFBSx+EagVFX4UWr64RAtcRAJ0TlplpOhMy31RFizai0I wZSUsHvgCfV5+y
    > jkYLKHfSh6kFgSrp79fWkw8=
    > =Wk58
    > -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----


    --
    Andrew Gabb
    email: agabb@tpgi.com.au Adelaide, South Australia
    phone: +61 8 8342-1021, fax: +61 8 8269-3280
    -----


  6. Re: "Distributed" vs "Decentralized systems"

    bks@panix.com (Bradley K. Sherman) wrote in message news:...
    > In article <414b0a12$0$20127$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>,
    wrote:
    > >What is the difference between distributed and decentralized systems?

    >
    > Six of one, half-dozen of the other.
    >
    > --bks


    are you a Prisoner of your defination?

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