apache install on fedora core 2 - Questions

This is a discussion on apache install on fedora core 2 - Questions ; First, I am a linux newbie/refugee from windows and I have installed fedora core 2. I have set up zend studio and everytime I try to access http://localhost , I get "connection refused". I know that apache was installed and ...

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Thread: apache install on fedora core 2

  1. apache install on fedora core 2

    First, I am a linux newbie/refugee from windows and I have installed
    fedora core 2. I have set up zend studio and everytime I try to access
    http://localhost, I get "connection refused". I know that apache was
    installed and I assumed that it was setup. Does the fedora setup
    initiate the apache server or do I have to start it? And, if I have to
    start, how is that done? Also, I am assuming that "localhost" is the
    same in windows and linux, it that correct? Any help is greatly
    appreciated. Thanks.

  2. Re: apache install on fedora core 2

    On 7 Sep 2004 16:25:12 -0700,
    sam@sam-sinopoli.com (Sam) posted:

    > First, I am a linux newbie/refugee from windows and I have installed
    > fedora core 2. I have set up zend studio and everytime I try to access
    > http://localhost, I get "connection refused". I know that apache was
    > installed and I assumed that it was setup. Does the fedora setup
    > initiate the apache server or do I have to start it? And, if I have to
    > start, how is that done?


    I don't know what "zend studio" is, but I think that Apache isn't started
    by default. You can start it as the root user with the following command
    line: /sbin/service httpd start

    For some reason, Red Hat decided to refer to the Apache webserver as just
    "httpd" as if it would be the only HTTP daemon that anyone would run,
    rather than refer to it by name (Apache).

    If you look through the menu, there's a system settings menu item, with a
    servers sub-menu, and a services sub-item (I'm doing this looking at Red
    Hat 9.0 Linux, so they may be named a bit differently). That'll run a GUI
    that will allow you to set the services that are normally run (or not run),
    by default.

    > Also, I am assuming that "localhost" is the same in windows and linux,
    > is that correct?


    Localhost is the usual hostname, on every system that I've heard of, that's
    applied to the 127.0.0.1 IP address. That IP address means itself. So
    yes, what you're used to doing on Windows with localhost is done the same
    way on Linux.

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