Partition in debian - Questions

This is a discussion on Partition in debian - Questions ; I'll by a new computer with two harddisc. One for windows(80g) and other for debian linux(120g). How to partition the linux disk? I'll make partitions at leat for directories: /swap and /boot. The rest for root dir. Thus directory / ...

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  1. Partition in debian

    I'll by a new computer with two harddisc. One for windows(80g) and other
    for debian linux(120g). How to partition the linux disk? I'll make
    partitions at leat for directories: /swap and /boot. The rest for root
    dir. Thus directory / would be over hundred gigas.

    Debian installation manual says that it is no good to make partitions over
    6g because of limitations of ext2 file system. Why is this limitation and
    what is the problem with bigger partitions? Can the Debian linux be
    installed on an other file system in which the partition size is no problem?

  2. Re: Partition in debian

    Juha wrote:

    > I'll by a new computer with two harddisc. One for windows(80g) and other
    > for debian linux(120g). How to partition the linux disk? I'll make
    > partitions at leat for directories: /swap and /boot. The rest for root
    > dir. Thus directory / would be over hundred gigas.
    >
    > Debian installation manual says that it is no good to make partitions over
    > 6g because of limitations of ext2 file system. Why is this limitation and
    > what is the problem with bigger partitions? Can the Debian linux be
    > installed on an other file system in which the partition size is no problem?


    /boot can be 64MB
    swap -- say, 512MB at the most, I guess you have plenty of RAM
    / say 20GB
    /home the rest

    Whatever you choose, if you keep /home as a seperate partition you can
    reinstall easily without losing all your files.

    Some people make /var, /var/www, /usr/bin, /usr, /tmp seperate. And /opt.

    IIRC you must have /bin, /sbin, /etc, /root, /mnt, /dev on the / partition.

    Don't use ext2, use ext3 or reiserfs.

    --
    Matt


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  3. Re: Partition in debian

    Matt wrote:

    >
    > /boot can be 64MB
    > swap -- say, 512MB at the most, I guess you have plenty of RAM
    > / say 20GB
    > /home the rest
    >
    > Whatever you choose, if you keep /home as a seperate partition you can
    > reinstall easily without losing all your files.
    >
    > Some people make /var, /var/www, /usr/bin, /usr, /tmp seperate. And /opt.
    >
    > IIRC you must have /bin, /sbin, /etc, /root, /mnt, /dev on the /
    > partition.
    >
    > Don't use ext2, use ext3 or reiserfs.
    >


    In addition to that, I recommend formatting the Windows Harddrive as FAT32
    instead of NTFS, and Linux support for NTFS isn't that great. What might
    work is to make two Windows partions - C: can be NTFS and used to store
    programs and such, and D: can be Fat32 and used to store documents that you
    might wish to access in Linux. AFAIK, Linux *read* support for NTFS works
    fine.

  4. Re: Partition in debian

    Patrick McDonnell wrote:

    > Matt wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> /boot can be 64MB
    >> swap -- say, 512MB at the most, I guess you have plenty of RAM
    >> / say 20GB
    >> /home the rest
    >>
    >> Whatever you choose, if you keep /home as a seperate partition you can
    >> reinstall easily without losing all your files.
    >>
    >> Some people make /var, /var/www, /usr/bin, /usr, /tmp seperate. And /opt.
    >>
    >> IIRC you must have /bin, /sbin, /etc, /root, /mnt, /dev on the /
    >> partition.
    >>
    >> Don't use ext2, use ext3 or reiserfs.
    >>

    > In addition to that, I recommend formatting the Windows Harddrive as FAT32
    > instead of NTFS, and Linux support for NTFS isn't that great. What might
    > work is to make two Windows partions - C: can be NTFS and used to store
    > programs and such, and D: can be Fat32 and used to store documents that you
    > might wish to access in Linux. AFAIK, Linux *read* support for NTFS works
    > fine.


    Yes, that's best. An NTFS partiton for c:, and a FAT32 one for D. You
    can make these with the Windows installer. Don't just use FAT32, since
    that doesn't support any file permissions so is more insecure.

    --
    Matt


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  5. Re: Partition in debian

    Juha wrote:
    > I'll by a new computer with two harddisc. One for windows(80g) and other
    > for debian linux(120g). How to partition the linux disk? I'll make
    > partitions at leat for directories: /swap and /boot. The rest for root
    > dir. Thus directory / would be over hundred gigas.


    As Matt already told you should assign a separate (and huge) /home
    partition. I don't think separate /boot would be needed for a new
    system. It was an alleviation for old (pre-99 or so) BIOSes which
    couldn't access beyond cyl 1024. I would suggest no separate partitions
    at all, particularly for a desktop machine: Only / (root) and /home are
    fine. Separate partitions for other directories are usually good for
    fine tuning servers. When you need a separate partition you will know
    it. If you don't have a compelling reason then don't partition.

    As for the swap... well it's somewhat grey area. My advise is, use
    something between 256M and 384M and split it into two, one part in 80G,
    the other in 120G disk. Swap should be of more or less fixed size, and
    either not be affected at all, or very weakly affected by RAM size. E.g.
    if you have 64M RAM use 256M swap, if you have 1G RAM use 384M swap, if
    you have 4G RAM, use 512M swap. (Or use 384M regardless of the RAM
    size.) This is not like what they tought to us? Feel free to ask why.

    Also, if you will always have the disks attached, I would suggest
    spreading I/O to the disks. There are many ways to do this. It is also
    possible to install both Linux and Windows, including "D:" partition to
    80G disk, and use 120G solely for /home. While one OS is running, the
    other is not. A point to consider while distributing I/O.

    > Debian installation manual says that it is no good to make partitions over
    > 6g because of limitations of ext2 file system. Why is this limitation and
    > what is the problem with bigger partitions? Can the Debian linux be
    > installed on an other file system in which the partition size is no problem?


    Could be an ancient limitation. Nowadays the limit is 2TB IIRC. At least
    I can confirm that a 960G ext3 FS would work nicely. I got one. BTW you
    surely would want ext3 and not ext2.

    --
    Abdullah | aramazan@ |
    Ramazanoglu | myrealbox |
    ____________| D.0.T cm |__

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