What version is recommended - Questions

This is a discussion on What version is recommended - Questions ; Hello Instead of using the various web-sites, I have decided to stream-line my research with a question to this message board. I have attempted to use some of the web-sites, but scanning them leaves me with more questions than answers. ...

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Thread: What version is recommended

  1. What version is recommended

    Hello

    Instead of using the various web-sites, I have decided to stream-line
    my research with a question to this message board. I have attempted
    to use some of the web-sites, but scanning them leaves me with more
    questions than answers.

    I suppose it could be said that, "I'm looking for the perfect LINUX
    distribution." My expectations are not that high. I am looking for a
    distribution that will dual-boot with my i486/Windows XP set-up. I
    have 1024 MB of memory, a NVIDIA GEFORCE 5900 graphics card, three 250
    GB hard drives ... so memory should not be a problem. The system also
    has speed.

    My research has led me to terms like '586' and '686'. Can I use a
    package with a '586' or '686' label with my i486?

    Also, my interest in LINUX includes low-level programming packages. I
    seem to believe that the LINUX operating system offers an alternative
    to the Window's API. Windows API has strict control over the
    peripherals, and I had hoped to find an environment structured a
    little differently.

    Finally, I read somewhere that some of the LINUX distributions come
    with assemblers/linkers/debuggers/editors/compilers etc. Is there a
    package with an emphasis on programming (especially low-level coding)?


    If anyone can recommend a distribution of LINUX that can (1) dual-boot
    with Windows XP/i486 and (2) one that comes with low-level coding
    software, please respond.

    Thanks ...

  2. Re: What version is recommended

    Andy Trickett wrote:

    > Hello
    >
    > Instead of using the various web-sites, I have decided to stream-line
    > my research with a question to this message board. I have attempted
    > to use some of the web-sites, but scanning them leaves me with more
    > questions than answers.
    >
    > I suppose it could be said that, "I'm looking for the perfect LINUX
    > distribution." My expectations are not that high. I am looking for a
    > distribution that will dual-boot with my i486/Windows XP set-up. I
    > have 1024 MB of memory, a NVIDIA GEFORCE 5900 graphics card, three 250
    > GB hard drives ... so memory should not be a problem. The system also
    > has speed.
    >
    > My research has led me to terms like '586' and '686'. Can I use a
    > package with a '586' or '686' label with my i486?
    >
    > Also, my interest in LINUX includes low-level programming packages. I
    > seem to believe that the LINUX operating system offers an alternative
    > to the Window's API. Windows API has strict control over the
    > peripherals, and I had hoped to find an environment structured a
    > little differently.
    >
    > Finally, I read somewhere that some of the LINUX distributions come
    > with assemblers/linkers/debuggers/editors/compilers etc. Is there a
    > package with an emphasis on programming (especially low-level coding)?
    >
    >
    > If anyone can recommend a distribution of LINUX that can (1) dual-boot
    > with Windows XP/i486 and (2) one that comes with low-level coding
    > software, please respond.
    >
    > Thanks ...


    Dear Andy,
    I thoroughly recommend Gentoo Linux ( www.gentoo.org ). I dual boot Gentoo
    with Windows 2000. If you have a broadband connection then you can install
    it via the net or download the ISO image.

    With almost all Linux distros you will get a good C compiler an assembler
    and a whole slew of development tools both low and high level. There is
    plenty of information available on programming I/O ports at the Linux
    Documentation Project.

    Check out the Gentoo website. Good Luck.

    Regards

    PJM


  3. Re: What version is recommended

    I just got mandrake linux 9.2 - seems to have everything you need.

    www.mandrakesoft.com

    --
    HomeBrewer

    http://home.earthlink.net/~t3e871/index.html
    www.rcparkflyers.com
    Remove the xxx to reply!



    "Andy Trickett" wrote in message
    news:1f417f0f.0401151355.4a66ad06@posting.google.c om...
    > Hello
    >
    > Instead of using the various web-sites, I have decided to stream-line
    > my research with a question to this message board. I have attempted
    > to use some of the web-sites, but scanning them leaves me with more
    > questions than answers.
    >
    > I suppose it could be said that, "I'm looking for the perfect LINUX
    > distribution." My expectations are not that high. I am looking for a
    > distribution that will dual-boot with my i486/Windows XP set-up. I
    > have 1024 MB of memory, a NVIDIA GEFORCE 5900 graphics card, three 250
    > GB hard drives ... so memory should not be a problem. The system also
    > has speed.
    >
    > My research has led me to terms like '586' and '686'. Can I use a
    > package with a '586' or '686' label with my i486?
    >
    > Also, my interest in LINUX includes low-level programming packages. I
    > seem to believe that the LINUX operating system offers an alternative
    > to the Window's API. Windows API has strict control over the
    > peripherals, and I had hoped to find an environment structured a
    > little differently.
    >
    > Finally, I read somewhere that some of the LINUX distributions come
    > with assemblers/linkers/debuggers/editors/compilers etc. Is there a
    > package with an emphasis on programming (especially low-level coding)?
    >
    >
    > If anyone can recommend a distribution of LINUX that can (1) dual-boot
    > with Windows XP/i486 and (2) one that comes with low-level coding
    > software, please respond.
    >
    > Thanks ...




  4. Re: What version is recommended

    Andy Trickett wrote:

    > Hello
    >
    > Instead of using the various web-sites, I have decided to stream-line
    > my research with a question to this message board. I have attempted
    > to use some of the web-sites, but scanning them leaves me with more
    > questions than answers.


    That can be dangerous...

    >
    > I suppose it could be said that, "I'm looking for the perfect LINUX
    > distribution." My expectations are not that high. I am looking for a
    > distribution that will dual-boot with my i486/Windows XP set-up. I
    > have 1024 MB of memory, a NVIDIA GEFORCE 5900 graphics card, three 250
    > GB hard drives ... so memory should not be a problem. The system also
    > has speed.


    By i486, what do you mean? You surely aren't running XP on a 486 with 250GB
    harddrives.

    >
    > My research has led me to terms like '586' and '686'. Can I use a
    > package with a '586' or '686' label with my i486?


    If you are running a 486, no you usually can't run 586 or 686 packages.
    However, if you are on a 686 (which I think you are), you can probably run
    586 and 486 packages. Usually your distro takes care of this for you.

    >
    > Also, my interest in LINUX includes low-level programming packages. I
    > seem to believe that the LINUX operating system offers an alternative
    > to the Window's API. Windows API has strict control over the
    > peripherals, and I had hoped to find an environment structured a
    > little differently.
    >
    > Finally, I read somewhere that some of the LINUX distributions come
    > with assemblers/linkers/debuggers/editors/compilers etc. Is there a
    > package with an emphasis on programming (especially low-level coding)?


    You can program using any distro you want - they all (mostly) have the same
    libraries and such (though the versions may differ). You'll just need to
    install a compiler (usually gcc, which can do c, c++, f77 and more), as
    well as a linker, called ld. You'll also need some development libraries,
    how you get these depends on your distro.

    >
    >
    > If anyone can recommend a distribution of LINUX that can (1) dual-boot
    > with Windows XP/i486


    Any distro can do that. Though its easier with some than others.

    > and (2) one that comes with low-level coding
    > software, please respond.
    >
    > Thanks ...


    Most mainstream distros (ie, Fedora, Debian, Suse and Gentoo come to mind)
    all have options to install coding stuff. Its usually in a "development"
    category. My advice would be to try one that looks good on their website,
    and if that doesn't work, try something else. I'd start with Fedora or
    Mandrake, and as you become more of a power user, consider switching to
    debian or gentoo. Just my $0.02.

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Jesus didn't just save the world, He made weekly offsite backups.

  5. Re: What version is recommended

    M2@M wrote:
    >>I suppose it could be said that, "I'm looking for the perfect LINUX
    >>distribution." My expectations are not that high. I am looking for a
    >>distribution that will dual-boot with my i486/Windows XP set-up. I
    >>have 1024 MB of memory, a NVIDIA GEFORCE 5900 graphics card, three 250
    >>GB hard drives ... so memory should not be a problem. The system also
    >>has speed.

    >
    >
    > By i486, what do you mean? You surely aren't running XP on a 486 with 250GB
    > harddrives.


    I'm guessing he has a P4. I don't think XP will run on a
    486, I KNOW you can't use a GeForce 5900 on any 486
    mainboard (no 8xAGP) and I really doubt there was ever a 486
    that could hold 1GB RAM (30 pin SIMMs, don't remember any
    SDRAM based 486 boards). You could use 250GB SCSI disks on
    a PCI SCSI controller...


  6. Re: What version is recommended


    > > By i486, what do you mean? You surely aren't running XP on a 486 with

    250GB
    > > harddrives.

    >
    > I'm guessing he has a P4. I don't think XP will run on a
    > 486, I KNOW you can't use a GeForce 5900 on any 486
    > mainboard (no 8xAGP) and



    > I really doubt there was ever a 486 that could hold 1GB RAM (30 pin

    SIMMs, don't remember any SDRAM based 486 boards).

    The best for 486 would be about 256 meg using 72 pin simms.





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