My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise - Questions

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  1. My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT consulting, I think
    I can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source
    community, and Linux in particular. The main reason that open source
    software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying
    immaturity of the technology and the perception of the viral GNU
    license.

    I know that the above statements are strong, but I have hard facts to
    back it up with. At the Fortune 500 company that I worked for, we
    wanted to leverage the power of Linux and associated open source
    technologies to benefit our server pool. The perception that Linux is
    "free" was too much to ignore. I recommended to the company that we
    use the newest version of Linux, version 9.0. My expectations were
    high that it would outperform our current solution at the time,
    Windows2000, which was doing an absolutely superb job (and still is!)
    serving as web, DNS, and FTP servers.

    I felt that I was up to the job to convert the entire server pool to
    the Linux technology. I had several years experience programming VB,
    C#, ASP, and .NET Framework at the kernel level. I didn't use C,
    because contrary to popular belief, ASP and VB can go just as low
    level as C can, and the latest .NET VB compiler produces code that is
    more portable and faster than C. I took it upon myself to configure
    and compile all of the necessary shareware versions of software that
    we needed, including sendmail, apache, and BIND. I even used the
    latest version of gcc (3.1) to increase the execution time of the
    binaries. After a long chain of events, the results of the system were
    less than impressive..

    The first bombshell to hit my project was that my client found out
    from another consultant that the GNU community has close ties to
    former communist leaders. Furthermore, he found out that the 'x' in
    Linux was a tribute to the former Communist philosopher, Karl Marx,
    whose name also ends in 'x'. The next bombshell to hit my project was
    the absolutely horrible performance. I knew from the beginning that
    Linux wasn't ready for the desktop, but I had always been told by my
    colleagues that it was better suited for a "server". As soon as I
    replaced all of the Windows2000 servers with Linux servers, the Linux
    servers immediately went into swap. Furthermore, almost all of the
    machines were quad-processor x86 servers. We had no idea that Linux
    had such awful SMP support. After less than 1 day in service, I was
    constantly having to restart servers, because for some reason, many of
    the servers were experiencing kernel panics caused by mod_perl
    crashing apache! The hardship did not end there! Apparently, the
    version of BIND installed on the server pool was remotely exploitable.
    Soon after we found that out, a new worm was remotely infecting all of
    our servers! We were not expecting this, because our IIS servers
    running
    on Windows2000 had never experienced a worm attack. Microsoft has
    always provided us with patches in the unlikely event that an exploit
    was found. It took us hundreds of man-hours just to disinfect our
    Linux servers! After just 48 hours of operating Linux servers in our
    server pool, we had exhausted our budget for the entire year! It was
    costing us approximately 75% more to run Linux than Windows2000.

    Needless to say, I will not be recommending Linux to any of my Fortune
    500 clients. In the beginning, we thought that since Linux was such
    "old" technology, it would be more mature than anything on the market.
    We also found out the hard way that rag-tag volunteer efforts
    responsible for Apache and BIND simply are not able to compete with
    the professional operations of Microsoft. I guess the old saying is
    true; "You get what you pay for!" Needless to say, I will be using
    Microsoft's "shared license" solution for my enterprise clients,
    rather than the communist GNU license.

    As it stands now, I do believe Linux has some practical uses. I think
    it will be useful in a University setting for first year computer
    science students to compile their "Hello World!" programs on (provided
    that gcc won't kernel panic the machine). Simply put, Linux just
    doesn't handle the rigors of a real-world work environment.

  2. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    On 5 Dec 2003 19:01:09 -0800, dj28@myway.com (Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD)
    wrote:

    >I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    >10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT consulting, I think
    >I can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source
    >community, and Linux in particular. The main reason that open source
    >software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying
    >immaturity of the technology and the perception of the viral GNU
    >license.

    [much nonsense snipped]

    Thanks for the laugh!

    Mike-
    Mornings: Evolution in action. Only the grumpy will survive.
    -----------------------------------------------------

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    email from you bounces, try non-HTML, non-encoded,
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  3. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:
    > I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    > 10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT consulting, I think
    > I can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source
    > community, and Linux in particular. The main reason that open source
    > software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying
    > immaturity of the technology and the perception of the viral GNU
    > license.
    >
    > I know that the above statements are strong, but I have hard facts to
    > back it up with. At the Fortune 500 company that I worked for, we
    > wanted to leverage the power of Linux and associated open source
    > technologies to benefit our server pool. The perception that Linux is
    > "free" was too much to ignore. I recommended to the company that we
    > use the newest version of Linux, version 9.0. My expectations were
    > high that it would outperform our current solution at the time,
    > Windows2000, which was doing an absolutely superb job (and still is!)
    > serving as web, DNS, and FTP servers.
    >
    > I felt that I was up to the job to convert the entire server pool to
    > the Linux technology. I had several years experience programming VB,
    > C#, ASP, and .NET Framework at the kernel level. I didn't use C,
    > because contrary to popular belief, ASP and VB can go just as low
    > level as C can, and the latest .NET VB compiler produces code that is
    > more portable and faster than C. I took it upon myself to configure
    > and compile all of the necessary shareware versions of software that
    > we needed, including sendmail, apache, and BIND. I even used the
    > latest version of gcc (3.1) to increase the execution time of the
    > binaries. After a long chain of events, the results of the system were
    > less than impressive..
    >
    > The first bombshell to hit my project was that my client found out
    > from another consultant that the GNU community has close ties to
    > former communist leaders. Furthermore, he found out that the 'x' in
    > Linux was a tribute to the former Communist philosopher, Karl Marx,
    > whose name also ends in 'x'. The next bombshell to hit my project was
    > the absolutely horrible performance. I knew from the beginning that
    > Linux wasn't ready for the desktop, but I had always been told by my
    > colleagues that it was better suited for a "server". As soon as I
    > replaced all of the Windows2000 servers with Linux servers, the Linux
    > servers immediately went into swap. Furthermore, almost all of the
    > machines were quad-processor x86 servers. We had no idea that Linux
    > had such awful SMP support. After less than 1 day in service, I was
    > constantly having to restart servers, because for some reason, many of
    > the servers were experiencing kernel panics caused by mod_perl
    > crashing apache! The hardship did not end there! Apparently, the
    > version of BIND installed on the server pool was remotely exploitable.
    > Soon after we found that out, a new worm was remotely infecting all of
    > our servers! We were not expecting this, because our IIS servers
    > running
    > on Windows2000 had never experienced a worm attack. Microsoft has
    > always provided us with patches in the unlikely event that an exploit
    > was found. It took us hundreds of man-hours just to disinfect our
    > Linux servers! After just 48 hours of operating Linux servers in our
    > server pool, we had exhausted our budget for the entire year! It was
    > costing us approximately 75% more to run Linux than Windows2000.
    >
    > Needless to say, I will not be recommending Linux to any of my Fortune
    > 500 clients. In the beginning, we thought that since Linux was such
    > "old" technology, it would be more mature than anything on the market.
    > We also found out the hard way that rag-tag volunteer efforts
    > responsible for Apache and BIND simply are not able to compete with
    > the professional operations of Microsoft. I guess the old saying is
    > true; "You get what you pay for!" Needless to say, I will be using
    > Microsoft's "shared license" solution for my enterprise clients,
    > rather than the communist GNU license.
    >
    > As it stands now, I do believe Linux has some practical uses. I think
    > it will be useful in a University setting for first year computer
    > science students to compile their "Hello World!" programs on (provided
    > that gcc won't kernel panic the machine). Simply put, Linux just
    > doesn't handle the rigors of a real-world work environment.



    You're an honest man. I can tell.

    --
    Diogenes Laertius


  4. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:
    > I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    > 10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT consulting, I think
    > I can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source
    > community, and Linux in particular. The main reason that open source
    > software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying
    > immaturity of the technology and the perception of the viral GNU
    > license.
    >


    YOU NEED TO SUCK MORE DICK

    THEN THE FORTNUE 500 WOULD PAY YOU MORE $$$$



  5. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    ["Followup-To:" header set to comp.os.linux.advocacy.]
    Fearing a spontaneous XP reboot, Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD mumbled this incantation:

    > I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    > 10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT consulting, I think
    > I can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source
    > community, and Linux in particular. The main reason that open source
    > software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying
    > immaturity of the technology and the perception of the viral GNU
    > license.


    [the rest of this classic technique, "The Erudite Troll", snipped
    for brevity.]

    > As it stands now, I do believe Linux has some practical uses. I think
    > it will be useful in a University setting for first year computer
    > science students to compile their "Hello World!" programs on (provided
    > that gcc won't kernel panic the machine). Simply put, Linux just
    > doesn't handle the rigors of a real-world work environment.


    I say, that was a great troll. No ranting, no curses, full of
    real-world scenarios and absolutely...

    ....wrong.

    Only the rankest of newbies would be fooled by your conclusion.

    But, I give it high marks, and it certainly elevates the Wintroll scores
    a bit.

    --
    No, I won't fix your Windows computer!

  6. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:

    > As an expert in the field of IT consulting,


    You're not fooling anyone, Jay.




  7. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Here we go again...

    On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 19:01:09 -0800, Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:

    > I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    > 10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT consulting, I think
    > I can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source
    > community, and Linux in particular. The main reason that open source
    > software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying
    > immaturity of the technology and the perception of the viral GNU
    > license.


    .... except that OSS is not failing.

    >
    > I know that the above statements are strong, but I have hard facts to
    > back it up with. At the Fortune 500 company that I worked for, we
    > wanted to leverage the power of Linux and associated open source
    > technologies to benefit our server pool. The perception that Linux is
    > "free" was too much to ignore. I recommended to the company that we
    > use the newest version of Linux, version 9.0.


    Linux, version 9.0? What the hell is that?

    > My expectations were
    > high that it would outperform our current solution at the time,
    > Windows2000, which was doing an absolutely superb job (and still is!)
    > serving as web, DNS, and FTP servers.
    >
    > I felt that I was up to the job to convert the entire server pool to
    > the Linux technology. I had several years experience programming VB,
    > C#, ASP, and .NET Framework at the kernel level. I didn't use C,
    > because contrary to popular belief, ASP and VB can go just as low
    > level as C can, and the latest .NET VB compiler produces code that is
    > more portable and faster than C. I took it upon myself to configure
    > and compile all of the necessary shareware versions of software that
    > we needed, including sendmail, apache, and BIND. I even used the
    > latest version of gcc (3.1) to increase the execution time of the
    > binaries. After a long chain of events, the results of the system were
    > less than impressive..


    I find it extemely hard to believe the performance of your network wasn't
    degraded this past fall.

    >
    > The first bombshell to hit my project was that my client found out
    > from another consultant that the GNU community has close ties to
    > former communist leaders. Furthermore, he found out that the 'x' in
    > Linux was a tribute to the former Communist philosopher, Karl Marx,
    > whose name also ends in 'x'.


    Are you a complete idiot, or do you just play one in Usenet?

    >The next bombshell to hit my project was
    > the absolutely horrible performance. I knew from the beginning that
    > Linux wasn't ready for the desktop, but I had always been told by my
    > colleagues that it was better suited for a "server". As soon as I
    > replaced all of the Windows2000 servers with Linux servers, the Linux
    > servers immediately went into swap. Furthermore, almost all of the
    > machines were quad-processor x86 servers. We had no idea that Linux
    > had such awful SMP support. After less than 1 day in service, I was
    > constantly having to restart servers, because for some reason, many of
    > the servers were experiencing kernel panics caused by mod_perl
    > crashing apache! The hardship did not end there! Apparently, the
    > version of BIND installed on the server pool was remotely exploitable.
    > Soon after we found that out, a new worm was remotely infecting all of
    > our servers! We were not expecting this, because our IIS servers
    > running


    Yup... you are a complete idiot.

    > on Windows2000 had never experienced a worm attack. Microsoft has
    > always provided us with patches in the unlikely event that an exploit
    > was found. It took us hundreds of man-hours just to disinfect our
    > Linux servers! After just 48 hours of operating Linux servers in our
    > server pool, we had exhausted our budget for the entire year! It was
    > costing us approximately 75% more to run Linux than Windows2000.
    >
    > Needless to say, I will not be recommending Linux to any of my Fortune
    > 500 clients. In the beginning, we thought that since Linux was such
    > "old" technology, it would be more mature than anything on the market.
    > We also found out the hard way that rag-tag volunteer efforts
    > responsible for Apache and BIND simply are not able to compete with
    > the professional operations of Microsoft.


    You may now explain why Apache's marketshare i kicking m$'s ass.

    > I guess the old saying is
    > true; "You get what you pay for!" Needless to say, I will be using
    > Microsoft's "shared license" solution for my enterprise clients,
    > rather than the communist GNU license.
    >
    > As it stands now, I do believe Linux has some practical uses. I think
    > it will be useful in a University setting for first year computer
    > science students to compile their "Hello World!" programs on (provided
    > that gcc won't kernel panic the machine). Simply put, Linux just
    > doesn't handle the rigors of a real-world work environment.


    So, you have shown yourself to be a complete lying idiot.

    --
    Rick


  8. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 19:01:09 -0800, Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:

    > I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    > 10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT consulting, I think I
    > can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source
    > community, and Linux in particular. The main reason that open source
    > software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying
    > immaturity of the technology and the perception of the viral GNU
    > license.
    >
    > I know that the above statements are strong, but I have hard facts to
    > back it up with. At the Fortune 500 company that I worked for, we wanted
    > to leverage the power of Linux and associated open source technologies
    > to benefit our server pool. The perception that Linux is "free" was too
    > much to ignore. I recommended to the company that we use the newest
    > version of Linux, version 9.0. My expectations were high that it would
    > outperform our current solution at the time, Windows2000, which was
    > doing an absolutely superb job (and still is!) serving as web, DNS, and
    > FTP servers.
    >
    > I felt that I was up to the job to convert the entire server pool to the
    > Linux technology. I had several years experience programming VB, C#,
    > ASP, and .NET Framework at the kernel level. I didn't use C, because
    > contrary to popular belief, ASP and VB can go just as low level as C
    > can, and the latest .NET VB compiler produces code that is more portable
    > and faster than C. I took it upon myself to configure and compile all of
    > the necessary shareware versions of software that we needed, including
    > sendmail, apache, and BIND. I even used the latest version of gcc (3.1)
    > to increase the execution time of the binaries. After a long chain of
    > events, the results of the system were less than impressive..
    >
    > The first bombshell to hit my project was that my client found out from
    > another consultant that the GNU community has close ties to former
    > communist leaders. Furthermore, he found out that the 'x' in Linux was a
    > tribute to the former Communist philosopher, Karl Marx, whose name also
    > ends in 'x'. The next bombshell to hit my project was the absolutely
    > horrible performance. I knew from the beginning that Linux wasn't ready
    > for the desktop, but I had always been told by my colleagues that it was
    > better suited for a "server". As soon as I replaced all of the
    > Windows2000 servers with Linux servers, the Linux servers immediately
    > went into swap. Furthermore, almost all of the machines were
    > quad-processor x86 servers. We had no idea that Linux had such awful SMP
    > support. After less than 1 day in service, I was constantly having to
    > restart servers, because for some reason, many of the servers were
    > experiencing kernel panics caused by mod_perl crashing apache! The
    > hardship did not end there! Apparently, the version of BIND installed on
    > the server pool was remotely exploitable. Soon after we found that out,
    > a new worm was remotely infecting all of our servers! We were not
    > expecting this, because our IIS servers running on Windows2000 had never
    > experienced a worm attack. Microsoft has always provided us with patches
    > in the unlikely event that an exploit was found. It took us hundreds of
    > man-hours just to disinfect our Linux servers! After just 48 hours of
    > operating Linux servers in our server pool, we had exhausted our budget
    > for the entire year! It was costing us approximately 75% more to run
    > Linux than Windows2000.
    >
    > Needless to say, I will not be recommending Linux to any of my Fortune
    > 500 clients. In the beginning, we thought that since Linux was such
    > "old" technology, it would be more mature than anything on the market.
    > We also found out the hard way that rag-tag volunteer efforts
    > responsible for Apache and BIND simply are not able to compete with the
    > professional operations of Microsoft. I guess the old saying is true;
    > "You get what you pay for!" Needless to say, I will be using Microsoft's
    > "shared license" solution for my enterprise clients, rather than the
    > communist GNU license.
    >
    > As it stands now, I do believe Linux has some practical uses. I think it
    > will be useful in a University setting for first year computer science
    > students to compile their "Hello World!" programs on (provided that gcc
    > won't kernel panic the machine). Simply put, Linux just doesn't handle
    > the rigors of a real-world work environment.



    Well this was definately amusing. I needed a good laugh today.

    HAHAHAHAHAHA

    Thank you


    Marc

  9. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Rick wrote:


    >> We also found out the hard way that rag-tag volunteer
    >> efforts responsible for Apache and BIND simply are not able to
    >> compete with the professional operations of Microsoft.

    >
    > You may now explain why Apache's marketshare i kicking m$'s ass.


    Er, because it's free?




  10. KMAN TOO OLD

    Kadaitcha Man wrote:

    2 OLD
    2 BORING
    2 MUCH

    2 GET US OFF

    SEND IN A NEW TROLL


  11. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    In article <9fd5c0e2.0312051901.3666884e@posting.google.com>,
    dj28@myway.com says...

    > The first bombshell to hit my project was that my client found out
    > from another consultant that the GNU community has close ties to
    > former communist leaders. Furthermore, he found out that the 'x' in
    > Linux was a tribute to the former Communist philosopher, Karl Marx,
    > whose name also ends in 'x'.




    LOL!!! That's hilarious - I'm defintely going to share this.





    ---
    "War is God's way of teaching Americans geography"

    -- Ambrose Bierce

  12. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:

    > software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying
    > immaturity of the technology and the perception of the viral GNU


    > 500 clients. In the beginning, we thought that since Linux was such
    > "old" technology, it would be more mature than anything on the market.


    rofl you even managed to contradict yourself, what next you auto cancel your
    trolls before we see them?

    --
    "Nirvana? Thats the place where the powers that be and their friends
    hang out.
    -- Zonker Harris


  13. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    > So, you have shown yourself to be a complete lying idiot.

    Just a guess, Rick, but I think he was joking.

    --
    Bolwerk
    --------------------------------
    IRC: live.megapipe.net #chatzone
    Port: 6667 - standard
    Port: 9999 - SSL-wrapped
    AIM: Unworldly
    ICQ: 2860349

  14. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:

    > I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company




    Not this tired horse**** AGAIN. How many times have you posted this?
    --
    Gary G. Taylor * Rialto, CA
    gary at donavan dot org / http:// geetee dot donavan dot org
    "The two most abundant things in the universe
    are hydrogen and stupidity." --Harlan Ellison

  15. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 21:14:06 -0800, Joe wrote:

    > In article <9fd5c0e2.0312051901.3666884e@posting.google.com>,
    > dj28@myway.com says...
    >
    >> the 'x' in Linux was a tribute to the former Communist
    >>philosopher, Karl Marx, whose name also ends in 'x'.

    >
    >
    >
    > LOL!!! That's hilarious - I'm defintely going to share this.


    If you do, try not to forget that Windows ends in an "s", as - spookily -
    so does "Engels". Puts me in mind of Monty Python's Meaning of Life:

    "Do all philosophers begin with an 's'?"

    "Yeah - I think they do!"

    "What about Nietzsche? That doesn't start with an 's'"

    "But there's an 's' in Nietzsche..."

    --
    Kind regards

    G H Williams


  16. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    TehGhodTrole wrote:

    > Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:
    >
    >> As an expert in the field of IT consulting,

    >
    > You're not fooling anyone, Jay.


    Ask him to tell us what's Linux version 9 ?

  17. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    SuperDeamon wrote:
    > TehGhodTrole wrote:
    >
    >> Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:
    >>
    >>> As an expert in the field of IT consulting,

    >>
    >> You're not fooling anyone, Jay.

    >
    > Ask him to tell us what's Linux version 9 ?


    You ask him, you total ****tard.


    --
    Your Free Insult: Thou retaining, steeping, blown-up dung ball anointing horse fly.



  18. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    On 5 Dec 2003 19:01:09 -0800, Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:
    > I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    > 10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT consulting,...

    (Snip ignorant rant)

    Posts like this are scary 'cause...

    1. If he really were a Fortune 500 consultant, businesses would be in
    deep trouble. Scary to thing they'd actually pay to listen to him.
    2. If he really were an IT "expert", businesses would be in deep
    trouble. Scary to think they'd entrust their IT to someone who knows so
    little.
    3. If he really had a PHD, our schools would clearly be in deep trouble.
    Scary to think they'd pass out a PHD to someone who...well...

    Fortunately, he's such a totally clueless, obvious Wintroll that he
    can't be more than about 13 years old (no offense to the many kids out
    there who know more than this guy). So he still has time to learn
    something before he has to go and try and hold a job. Otherwise, it's

    gonna be "Do you want fries with that?" for life.

    --
    Registered Linux user #266531

  19. A low cost alternative ?

    Hello John Bailo , You say : " SEND IN A NEW TROLL "

    Sergeant Relfer reporting for duty ... Sir !

    In the Clinton era , Greenspan said :
    " Throw out all the " Old " rules " .

    The result ? The old rules should've been kept .

    Tech is bleeding jobs at a fantastic rate ...
    And for how many years to come ?
    And will those jobs ever come back ?

    Let's see ... Techies are getting poorer ,
    so they are Forced to use free software ... like Apache .

    What happens if a country like Russia or China
    steps in with a Low cost alternative ? !

    It's a brave new world .

  20. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:



    Please do not feed the troll.

    --
    Ruurd
    ..o.
    ...o
    ooo

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