My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise - Questions

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Thread: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

  1. . You omitted tits .

    Hello John Bailo , You proscribe :
    " YOU NEED TO SUCK MORE DICK "

    You're such a genderist , You omitted tits .

  2. Re: . You omitted tits .

    Oops , make that " Prescribe " not " Proscribe " .

  3. . Diogenes of Sinope .

    Hello Diogenes Laertius , You say :
    " You're an honest man . I can tell .

    It was Diogenes of Sinope
    http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/d/diogsino.htm
    not Diogenes Laertius
    http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/d/dioglaer.htm
    that was the cynical " mad man "
    looking for an honest man .

    Diogenes of Sinope would probably say something like :
    " God is dead , and we have killed him "

    But I say God is a title ,
    not unlike " Lord " or " Master " .

    God is just some superior in your life ,
    so he's probably quite alive and kicking .

  4. Re: . Diogenes of Sinope .

    Jeff Relf wrote:
    > Hello Diogenes Laertius , You say :
    > " You're an honest man . I can tell .
    >
    > It was Diogenes of Sinope
    > http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/d/diogsino.htm
    > not Diogenes Laertius
    > http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/d/dioglaer.htm
    > that was the cynical " mad man "
    > looking for an honest man .
    >
    > Diogenes of Sinope would probably say something like :
    > " God is dead , and we have killed him "
    >
    > But I say God is a title ,
    > not unlike " Lord " or " Master " .
    >
    > God is just some superior in your life ,
    > so he's probably quite alive and kicking .


    Hmmmm.... Yes.
    --
    Diogenes


  5. DILWAD OF ****SVILLE

    Diogenes wrote:
    > Jeff Relf wrote:
    >
    >>Hello Diogenes Laertius , You say :
    >>" You're an honest man . I can tell .
    >>
    >>It was Diogenes of Sinope
    >> http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/d/diogsino.htm
    >> not Diogenes Laertius
    >> http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/d/dioglaer.htm
    >> that was the cynical " mad man "
    >> looking for an hone


    i SAY OLD BEAN, WOULD YOU POUR US A SPOT
    OF TEA...PIP CHERRIO AND ALL THAT ROT...


  6. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    bolwerk wrote:
    >> So, you have shown yourself to be a complete lying idiot.

    >
    > Just a guess, Rick, but I think he was joking.


    Nah, he was being honest.

    --
    Diogenes


  7. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:

    [BIG Snip]

    I have seen variations of this post many times in this group. The dead
    giveaway is this:

    > I felt that I was up to the job to convert the entire server pool to
    > the Linux technology. I had several years experience programming VB,
    > C#, ASP, and .NET Framework at the kernel level. I didn't use C,
    > because contrary to popular belief, ASP and VB can go just as low
    > level as C can, and the latest .NET VB compiler produces code that is
    > more portable and faster than C.


    This exact paragraph extract, with a few mods, has been used at least half a
    dozen times on this NG alone.

    "C#, ASP, and .NET Framework at the kernel level?"

    Give me a break, there is no .NET implementation in the Windows kernel.
    There is no need for ASP code at the kernel level.

    If the original poster is so clueless that he can post this stuff thinking
    people would believe it, chances are anything else he posted is equally in
    error.


  8. Re: DILWAD OF ****SVILLE

    John Bailo wrote:
    || Diogenes wrote:
    ||| Jeff Relf wrote:
    |||
    |||| Hello Diogenes Laertius , You say :
    |||| " You're an honest man . I can tell .
    ||||
    |||| It was Diogenes of Sinope
    |||| http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/d/diogsino.htm
    |||| not Diogenes Laertius
    |||| http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/d/dioglaer.htm
    |||| that was the cynical " mad man "
    |||| looking for an hone
    ||
    || i SAY OLD BEAN, WOULD YOU POUR US A SPOT
    || OF TEA...PIP CHERRIO AND ALL THAT ROT...

    BWAHAHAHAHAHA
    You clueless ****ing twat.

    --
    Gazwad

    Freelance scientist and people tester.
    Guardian: alt.os.windows-xp





  9. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Somebody explain how GPL is viral? Since when is the technology "immature"?
    Unix (which Linux is partly based on) has been around longer than Windoze...
    Try finding a Linux forum on a webpage or a chat room for non-Linux losers,
    then post this stuff. Maybe people there will agree with you. Linux on my
    system has never crashed. I stopped counting Windoze crashes at over 200 two
    years ago. Cut your crap.

    There is no Linux 9.0. There is Linux 2.6 as the newest (real Linux people
    correct me if I'm wrong). Different distributors of Linux have different
    version numbers, depending on which software it contains, how new it is,
    etc. SuSE released a 9.0 recently, because a lot of software updates (as in
    gcc or glibc were newer versions) from 8.2.

    Tell me where the hell you got "shareware" sendmail apache bind etc.?
    THEY'RE FREE, YOU DOLT!

    What the *$%! does communism have to do with Linux?

    Try installing security programs... That might help... Um, I wonder why
    they're have "security" in the name? The only way I managed to get several
    worms/viruses off my Windoze computer was by going through network with
    Linux and clean it. Linux never got infected... Damn you're an idiot:
    "Microsoft has always provided us with patches in the unlikely event that an
    exploit was found." Where'd you get "unlikely" from? There are constantly
    tons of new ways to get into Windoze systems.

    Try installing an SMP kernel, those work better for multi-proc machines than
    the standard kernel...


    "Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD" wrote in message
    news:9fd5c0e2.0312051901.3666884e@posting.google.c om...
    > I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    > 10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT consulting, I think
    > I can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source
    > community, and Linux in particular. The main reason that open source
    > software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying
    > immaturity of the technology and the perception of the viral GNU
    > license.
    >
    > I know that the above statements are strong, but I have hard facts to
    > back it up with. At the Fortune 500 company that I worked for, we
    > wanted to leverage the power of Linux and associated open source
    > technologies to benefit our server pool. The perception that Linux is
    > "free" was too much to ignore. I recommended to the company that we
    > use the newest version of Linux, version 9.0. My expectations were
    > high that it would outperform our current solution at the time,
    > Windows2000, which was doing an absolutely superb job (and still is!)
    > serving as web, DNS, and FTP servers.
    >
    > I felt that I was up to the job to convert the entire server pool to
    > the Linux technology. I had several years experience programming VB,
    > C#, ASP, and .NET Framework at the kernel level. I didn't use C,
    > because contrary to popular belief, ASP and VB can go just as low
    > level as C can, and the latest .NET VB compiler produces code that is
    > more portable and faster than C. I took it upon myself to configure
    > and compile all of the necessary shareware versions of software that
    > we needed, including sendmail, apache, and BIND. I even used the
    > latest version of gcc (3.1) to increase the execution time of the
    > binaries. After a long chain of events, the results of the system were
    > less than impressive..
    >
    > The first bombshell to hit my project was that my client found out
    > from another consultant that the GNU community has close ties to
    > former communist leaders. Furthermore, he found out that the 'x' in
    > Linux was a tribute to the former Communist philosopher, Karl Marx,
    > whose name also ends in 'x'. The next bombshell to hit my project was
    > the absolutely horrible performance. I knew from the beginning that
    > Linux wasn't ready for the desktop, but I had always been told by my
    > colleagues that it was better suited for a "server". As soon as I
    > replaced all of the Windows2000 servers with Linux servers, the Linux
    > servers immediately went into swap. Furthermore, almost all of the
    > machines were quad-processor x86 servers. We had no idea that Linux
    > had such awful SMP support. After less than 1 day in service, I was
    > constantly having to restart servers, because for some reason, many of
    > the servers were experiencing kernel panics caused by mod_perl
    > crashing apache! The hardship did not end there! Apparently, the
    > version of BIND installed on the server pool was remotely exploitable.
    > Soon after we found that out, a new worm was remotely infecting all of
    > our servers! We were not expecting this, because our IIS servers
    > running
    > on Windows2000 had never experienced a worm attack. Microsoft has
    > always provided us with patches in the unlikely event that an exploit
    > was found. It took us hundreds of man-hours just to disinfect our
    > Linux servers! After just 48 hours of operating Linux servers in our
    > server pool, we had exhausted our budget for the entire year! It was
    > costing us approximately 75% more to run Linux than Windows2000.
    >
    > Needless to say, I will not be recommending Linux to any of my Fortune
    > 500 clients. In the beginning, we thought that since Linux was such
    > "old" technology, it would be more mature than anything on the market.
    > We also found out the hard way that rag-tag volunteer efforts
    > responsible for Apache and BIND simply are not able to compete with
    > the professional operations of Microsoft. I guess the old saying is
    > true; "You get what you pay for!" Needless to say, I will be using
    > Microsoft's "shared license" solution for my enterprise clients,
    > rather than the communist GNU license.
    >
    > As it stands now, I do believe Linux has some practical uses. I think
    > it will be useful in a University setting for first year computer
    > science students to compile their "Hello World!" programs on (provided
    > that gcc won't kernel panic the machine). Simply put, Linux just
    > doesn't handle the rigors of a real-world work environment.




  10. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in theenterprise

    On 5 Dec 2003 19:01:09 -0800, dj28@myway.com (Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD) wrote:

    > As an expert in the field of IT consulting, I think
    > I can shed a little light the company that we


    .... i doubt it, based on the next statement:

    > use the newest version of Linux, version 9.0.


    ___ ___
    ___ / /\ / /\
    / /\ / /::\ / /::\
    / /:/ / /:/\:\ / /:/\:\ ___ ___ ___ ___
    / /:/ / /:/~/:/ / /:/ \:\ /__/\ / /\ /__/\ / /\
    / /::\ /__/:/ /:/___ /__/:/ \__\:\ \ \:\ / /:/ \ \:\ / /:/
    /__/:/\:\ \ \:\/:::::/ \ \:\ / /:/ \ \:\ /:/ \ \:\ /:/
    \__\/ \:\ \ \::/~~~~ \ \:\ /:/ \ \:\/:/ \ \:\/:/
    \ \:\ \ \:\ \ \:\/:/ \ \::/ \ \::/
    \__\/ \ \:\ \ \::/ \__\/ \__\/
    \__\/ \__\/

    --
    /// Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer, skydiver, \\\
    \\\ and author: "Inside Linux", "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed" ///
    A man needs a mistress, just to break the monogamy.

  11. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    begin In <9fd5c0e2.0312051901.3666884e@posting.google.com>, on
    12/05/2003
    at 07:01 PM, dj28@myway.com (Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD) said:

    >I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    >10,000 employees).


    As a janitor, perhaps. Your article demonstrates your ignorance.

    >As an expert in the field of IT consulting,


    As a freshman at Technische Universitaet Dresden, at least until you
    flunk out.

    >I think


    ObQuirk

    >I can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source
    >community,


    Here's a free clue: you can't shed light by making things up out of
    the whole cloth, especially when you don't even understand the terms
    you're slinging around.

    >wanted to leverage


    Sounds like marketting BS.

    >I recommended to the company that we
    >use the newest version of Linux, version 9.0.


    There's you first mistake; there is no such animal. If you were really
    an expert then you would know that there is more than one distribution
    and would know the difference between a release of a distribution and
    a release of the kernel.

    >I felt that I was up to the job to convert the entire server pool to
    >the Linux technology. I had several years experience programming VB,
    >C#, ASP, and .NET Framework at the kernel level.


    There's your second mistake.

    >I took it upon myself to configure
    >and compile all of the necessary shareware versions


    There's your third mistake.

    >The first bombshell to hit my project was that my client found out
    >from another consultant that the GNU community has close ties to
    >former communist leaders.


    And there's where you cross the line from simple lying to libel. That
    claim, of course, is as bogus as your intellectual pretensions.

    >Furthermore, he found out that the 'x' in Linux was a tribute to the former
    >Communist philosopher, Karl Marx, whose name also ends in 'x'.


    Please tell me that you were writing a spoof and aren't really that
    stupid.

    >The next bombshell to hit my project was the absolutely horrible
    >performance.


    Yes, you're an expert and you didn't do any testing before cutting
    over to production. Sure we believe you.

    >I knew from the beginning that Linux wasn't ready for the desktop,


    It doesn't have to be ready; it only has to be more ready than
    windoze.

    >We were not expecting this, because our IIS servers running
    >on Windows2000 had never experienced a worm attack.


    Yesh, right "It Isn't Stable" had no security problems. Pull the other
    one, it's got bells on.

    >We also found out the hard way that rag-tag volunteer efforts
    >responsible for Apache and BIND simply are not able to compete with
    >the professional operations of Microsoft.


    "Please reformat your hard drive and reinstall windoze."

    Please, if you're going to make up garbage like this, put some work
    into it and try to make it at least superficially plausible. As it is,
    you're only embarrassing yourself.

    --
    Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz, SysProg and JOAT

    Unsolicited bulk E-mail will be subject to legal action. I reserve
    the right to publicly post or ridicule any abusive E-mail.

    Reply to domain Patriot dot net user shmuel+news to contact me. Do
    not reply to spamtrap@library.lspace.org


  12. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    "Gordon Pettey" wrote in message
    news:2SnAb.4320$fz2.876@newssvr24.news.prodigy.com

    > What the *$%! does communism have to do with Linux?


    It's a borderline invocation of Godwin's Law.

    --




    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
    -----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----

  13. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in theenterprise



    On Sat, 5 Dec 2003, Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:

    > I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    > 10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT consulting, I think
    > I can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source
    > community, and Linux in particular. The main reason that open source
    > software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying
    > immaturity of the technology and the perception of the viral GNU
    > license.
    >
    > I know that the above statements are strong, but I have hard facts to
    > back it up with. At the Fortune 500 company that I worked for, we
    > wanted to leverage the power of Linux and associated open source
    > technologies to benefit our server pool. The perception that Linux is
    > "free" was too much to ignore. I recommended to the company that we
    > use the newest version of Linux, version 9.0. My expectations were
    > high that it would outperform our current solution at the time,
    > Windows2000, which was doing an absolutely superb job (and still is!)
    > serving as web, DNS, and FTP servers.
    >
    > I felt that I was up to the job to convert the entire server pool to
    > the Linux technology. I had several years experience programming VB,
    > C#, ASP, and .NET Framework at the kernel level. I didn't use C,
    > because contrary to popular belief, ASP and VB can go just as low
    > level as C can, and the latest .NET VB compiler produces code that is
    > more portable and faster than C. I took it upon myself to configure
    > and compile all of the necessary shareware versions of software that
    > we needed, including sendmail, apache, and BIND. I even used the
    > latest version of gcc (3.1) to increase the execution time of the
    > binaries. After a long chain of events, the results of the system were
    > less than impressive..
    >
    > The first bombshell to hit my project was that my client found out
    > from another consultant that the GNU community has close ties to
    > former communist leaders. Furthermore, he found out that the 'x' in
    > Linux was a tribute to the former Communist philosopher, Karl Marx,
    > whose name also ends in 'x'. The next bombshell to hit my project was
    > the absolutely horrible performance. I knew from the beginning that
    > Linux wasn't ready for the desktop, but I had always been told by my
    > colleagues that it was better suited for a "server". As soon as I
    > replaced all of the Windows2000 servers with Linux servers, the Linux
    > servers immediately went into swap. Furthermore, almost all of the
    > machines were quad-processor x86 servers. We had no idea that Linux
    > had such awful SMP support. After less than 1 day in service, I was
    > constantly having to restart servers, because for some reason, many of
    > the servers were experiencing kernel panics caused by mod_perl
    > crashing apache! The hardship did not end there! Apparently, the
    > version of BIND installed on the server pool was remotely exploitable.
    > Soon after we found that out, a new worm was remotely infecting all of
    > our servers! We were not expecting this, because our IIS servers
    > running
    > on Windows2000 had never experienced a worm attack. Microsoft has
    > always provided us with patches in the unlikely event that an exploit
    > was found. It took us hundreds of man-hours just to disinfect our
    > Linux servers! After just 48 hours of operating Linux servers in our
    > server pool, we had exhausted our budget for the entire year! It was
    > costing us approximately 75% more to run Linux than Windows2000.
    >
    > Needless to say, I will not be recommending Linux to any of my Fortune
    > 500 clients. In the beginning, we thought that since Linux was such
    > "old" technology, it would be more mature than anything on the market.
    > We also found out the hard way that rag-tag volunteer efforts
    > responsible for Apache and BIND simply are not able to compete with
    > the professional operations of Microsoft. I guess the old saying is
    > true; "You get what you pay for!" Needless to say, I will be using
    > Microsoft's "shared license" solution for my enterprise clients,
    > rather than the communist GNU license.
    >
    > As it stands now, I do believe Linux has some practical uses. I think
    > it will be useful in a University setting for first year computer
    > science students to compile their "Hello World!" programs on (provided
    > that gcc won't kernel panic the machine). Simply put, Linux just
    > doesn't handle the rigors of a real-world work environment.
    >


    Clown!

    /R

  14. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    roger wrote:

    >
    >
    > On Sat, 5 Dec 2003, Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:
    >
    >> I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than
    >> 10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT consulting, I think
    >> I can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source
    >> community, and Linux in particular. The main reason that open source
    >> software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying
    >> immaturity of the technology and the perception of the viral GNU
    >> license.

    {and so the long message wears on.....}
    >
    > Clown!
    >
    > /R


    Well said, Rog! What a maroon!

  15. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    ["Followup-To:" header set to alt.os.linux.]
    On 2003-12-07, roger wrote:
    > On Sat, 5 Dec 2003, Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:


    > Clown!


    And you quoted all that just to add a 6 bytes? It makes you think who
    the real clown really is....


    --
    The Linux 2.4.22 kernel has in it's source code the word "f*ck" mentioned 26
    times!!!
    * Wirzenius wrote this portably, Torvalds ****ed it up :-) -- vsprintf.c


  16. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 19:01:09 -0800, Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:



    Do you just keep this message around and post it every once in a while?
    This is at leat the second time this has been posted in the last year.
    If you're going to troll you shouldn't do it with a form letter.

    --
    i.m.
    The USA Patriot Act is the most unpatriotic act in American history.


  17. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    On 5 Dec 2003 19:01:09 -0800, Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:
    > C#, ASP, and .NET Framework at the kernel level. I didn't use C,
    > because contrary to popular belief, ASP and VB can go just as low
    > level as C can, and the latest .NET VB compiler produces code that is
    > faster than C.


    How can managed code be faster than native code? That's impossible.

    --
    General Protection Fault
    generalpf@nospam.yahoo.reallynospam.com

  18. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:


    > because contrary to popular belief, ASP and VB can go just as low
    > level as C can, and the latest .NET VB compiler produces code that is
    > more portable and faster than C.


    ROTFL!

    ASP is an interpreter language, ran and interpreted by a server that is
    most likely programmed in C itself. And if VB can go more low level than
    C, how come I can still only program code for events that M$ prepared
    for me?

    Maurits.


  19. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 09:24:38 +0100, Maurits van de Kamp wrote:

    > Dr. Abraham Weiss PhD wrote:
    >
    >
    >> because contrary to popular belief, ASP and VB can go just as low
    >> level as C can, and the latest .NET VB compiler produces code that is
    >> more portable and faster than C.

    >
    > ROTFL!
    >
    > ASP is an interpreter language, ran and interpreted by a server that is
    > most likely programmed in C itself. And if VB can go more low level than
    > C, how come I can still only program code for events that M$ prepared
    > for me?


    He's also got a bizarre notion of "portable". C code is portable because,
    if written according to the standard, the code can be compiled on (or for)
    almost any platform out there. VB code, last I checked, was exclusive to
    Windows.



  20. Re: My experiences trying to leverage the power of Linux in the enterprise

    Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:

    > He's also got a bizarre notion of "portable". C code is portable because,
    > if written according to the standard, the code can be compiled on (or for)
    > almost any platform out there. VB code, last I checked, was exclusive to
    > Windows.


    Portablility means a different thing in the age of VMs.


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