Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side) - Questions

This is a discussion on Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side) - Questions ; I would like to install Linux on my Sony notebook CNV1 (141A) 600Mhz 112MB Ram So will Linux understand the hard ware of the pc, how would I access the built in camera or operate the jog dial. Does it ...

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Thread: Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side)

  1. Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side)

    I would like to install Linux on my Sony notebook CNV1 (141A) 600Mhz 112MB
    Ram
    So will Linux understand the hard ware of the pc, how would I access the
    built in camera
    or operate the jog dial. Does it drag like windows, is 600 MHz good enough
    for it.
    Does it work with high-speed internet.
    Will it understand the pc card slot, or memory stick.
    what is the main function of Linux, does it have enough for me to forget
    windows.
    I am currently running windows ME and it frustrating enough and I just want
    to make sure that
    I am not leaping into bigger trouble. what are it limitation and is it
    friendly with ms docs.

    These are my question.
    thanks

    Steve

    ps. can someone clue on difference between the version out there



  2. Re: Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side)

    StvyLife wrote:

    > I would like to install Linux on my Sony notebook CNV1 (141A) 600Mhz 112MB
    > Ram
    > So will Linux understand the hard ware of the pc, how would I access the
    > built in camera
    > or operate the jog dial. Does it drag like windows, is 600 MHz good enough
    > for it.
    > Does it work with high-speed internet.
    > Will it understand the pc card slot, or memory stick.
    > what is the main function of Linux, does it have enough for me to forget
    > windows.
    > I am currently running windows ME and it frustrating enough and I just
    > want to make sure that
    > I am not leaping into bigger trouble. what are it limitation and is it
    > friendly with ms docs.
    >
    > These are my question.
    > thanks
    >
    > Steve
    >
    > ps. can someone clue on difference between the version out there


    Linux's downside is that you'll have to find out yourself whether the laptop
    will work. It's the manufacturers' fault, not the developers.

    You'll probably find that some bits work and others won't (modem/ethernet).

    Pick another windowmanager, such as Windowmaker (or fvwm95 if you want to
    keep a look similar to Windows 9x.

  3. Re: Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side)

    On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 05:21:26 +0000, StvyLife wrote:

    > I would like to install Linux on my Sony notebook CNV1 (141A) 600Mhz
    > 112MB Ram
    > So will Linux understand the hard ware of the pc, how would I access the
    > built in camera
    > or operate the jog dial. Does it drag like windows, is 600 MHz good
    > enough for it.
    > Does it work with high-speed internet. Will it understand the pc card
    > slot, or memory stick. what is the main function of Linux, does it have
    > enough for me to forget windows.
    > I am currently running windows ME and it frustrating enough and I just
    > want to make sure that
    > I am not leaping into bigger trouble. what are it limitation and is it
    > friendly with ms docs.
    >
    > These are my question.
    > thanks
    >
    > Steve
    >
    > ps. can someone clue on difference between the version out there


    Laptop computers, on the whole, contain a lot of proprietry hardware which
    is designed to be used with Microsoft Windows and nothing else. You still
    have a very good chance that your laptop will function with linux, due to
    the continuing efforts to reverse-engineer that proprietary hardware and
    build linux drivers for it.
    The modem, if you have one, is probably a write-off. No laptop
    manufacturer I know about uses real "hardware" modems any more. Instead,
    they build what would more correctly be called a "sound card" and use
    Microsoft Windows to emulate a modem. Some of these "Winmodems" can be
    used under linux, given special drivers - and some can't.
    As to the different distributions of linux? Difficult question. Mandrake
    makes what is probably the easiest, most "Windows-like" one, but it uses
    RedHat's "RPM" package system for software to be downloaded and installed.
    As long as you install only that software that was designed to run with
    your particular version number of your distribution, that shouldn't be too
    great a problem. Otherwise, difficulties may occur.
    All of the distributions seem to include a great deal of free software,
    and would likely have anything you might wish to install, from web browsers to
    Office software, to art, to multimedia, to games.

    Go ahead and play with it. It's cheap enough.

    Karl S.


    --
    Lord Atticrat, Duke of Solderwicke, Duc'Taep, and Les Isles Du Theatre


  4. Re: Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side)

    k thanks, I thought i had a real modem.
    I guess I'll have to go with the dualboot system; but i am gonna need help
    to do that.
    I wish I fisically know someone who had done so I can take my labtop to
    them.
    Is the a step by step installation guide some where.
    given my specification, what version do I download and from where.
    are there tools to help me. how do i do the partions for dual boot.
    then what to I do next. and so on...

    stev

    "Karl S." wrote in message
    news:3Oevb.7693$sb4.7134@newsread2.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
    > On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 05:21:26 +0000, StvyLife wrote:
    >
    > > I would like to install Linux on my Sony notebook CNV1 (141A) 600Mhz
    > > 112MB Ram
    > > So will Linux understand the hard ware of the pc, how would I access the
    > > built in camera
    > > or operate the jog dial. Does it drag like windows, is 600 MHz good
    > > enough for it.
    > > Does it work with high-speed internet. Will it understand the pc card
    > > slot, or memory stick. what is the main function of Linux, does it have
    > > enough for me to forget windows.
    > > I am currently running windows ME and it frustrating enough and I just
    > > want to make sure that
    > > I am not leaping into bigger trouble. what are it limitation and is it
    > > friendly with ms docs.
    > >
    > > These are my question.
    > > thanks
    > >
    > > Steve
    > >
    > > ps. can someone clue on difference between the version out there

    >
    > Laptop computers, on the whole, contain a lot of proprietry hardware which
    > is designed to be used with Microsoft Windows and nothing else. You still
    > have a very good chance that your laptop will function with linux, due to
    > the continuing efforts to reverse-engineer that proprietary hardware and
    > build linux drivers for it.
    > The modem, if you have one, is probably a write-off. No laptop
    > manufacturer I know about uses real "hardware" modems any more. Instead,
    > they build what would more correctly be called a "sound card" and use
    > Microsoft Windows to emulate a modem. Some of these "Winmodems" can be
    > used under linux, given special drivers - and some can't.
    > As to the different distributions of linux? Difficult question. Mandrake
    > makes what is probably the easiest, most "Windows-like" one, but it uses
    > RedHat's "RPM" package system for software to be downloaded and installed.
    > As long as you install only that software that was designed to run with
    > your particular version number of your distribution, that shouldn't be too
    > great a problem. Otherwise, difficulties may occur.
    > All of the distributions seem to include a great deal of free software,
    > and would likely have anything you might wish to install, from web

    browsers to
    > Office software, to art, to multimedia, to games.
    >
    > Go ahead and play with it. It's cheap enough.
    >
    > Karl S.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Lord Atticrat, Duke of Solderwicke, Duc'Taep, and Les Isles Du Theatre
    >




  5. Re: Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side)

    steve
    Dual booting is real easy. Partition your hard drive into two partitions.
    Next install your windows OS just like normal on one of the partitions.
    Finally download and install a linux distro like fedora and install to the
    second partition. It will give you an oportunity to add the windows
    install to your Grub welcome screen. That's it...it's that simple.


    dagl


    On Fri, 21 Nov 2003 16:26:29 +0000, StvyLife wrote:

    > k thanks, I thought i had a real modem.
    > I guess I'll have to go with the dualboot system; but i am gonna need help
    > to do that.
    > I wish I fisically know someone who had done so I can take my labtop to
    > them.
    > Is the a step by step installation guide some where.
    > given my specification, what version do I download and from where.
    > are there tools to help me. how do i do the partions for dual boot.
    > then what to I do next. and so on...
    >
    > stev
    >
    > "Karl S." wrote in message
    > news:3Oevb.7693$sb4.7134@newsread2.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
    >> On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 05:21:26 +0000, StvyLife wrote:
    >>
    >> > I would like to install Linux on my Sony notebook CNV1 (141A) 600Mhz
    >> > 112MB Ram
    >> > So will Linux understand the hard ware of the pc, how would I access the
    >> > built in camera
    >> > or operate the jog dial. Does it drag like windows, is 600 MHz good
    >> > enough for it.
    >> > Does it work with high-speed internet. Will it understand the pc card
    >> > slot, or memory stick. what is the main function of Linux, does it have
    >> > enough for me to forget windows.
    >> > I am currently running windows ME and it frustrating enough and I just
    >> > want to make sure that
    >> > I am not leaping into bigger trouble. what are it limitation and is it
    >> > friendly with ms docs.
    >> >
    >> > These are my question.
    >> > thanks
    >> >
    >> > Steve
    >> >
    >> > ps. can someone clue on difference between the version out there

    >>
    >> Laptop computers, on the whole, contain a lot of proprietry hardware which
    >> is designed to be used with Microsoft Windows and nothing else. You still
    >> have a very good chance that your laptop will function with linux, due to
    >> the continuing efforts to reverse-engineer that proprietary hardware and
    >> build linux drivers for it.
    >> The modem, if you have one, is probably a write-off. No laptop
    >> manufacturer I know about uses real "hardware" modems any more. Instead,
    >> they build what would more correctly be called a "sound card" and use
    >> Microsoft Windows to emulate a modem. Some of these "Winmodems" can be
    >> used under linux, given special drivers - and some can't.
    >> As to the different distributions of linux? Difficult question. Mandrake
    >> makes what is probably the easiest, most "Windows-like" one, but it uses
    >> RedHat's "RPM" package system for software to be downloaded and installed.
    >> As long as you install only that software that was designed to run with
    >> your particular version number of your distribution, that shouldn't be too
    >> great a problem. Otherwise, difficulties may occur.
    >> All of the distributions seem to include a great deal of free software,
    >> and would likely have anything you might wish to install, from web

    > browsers to
    >> Office software, to art, to multimedia, to games.
    >>
    >> Go ahead and play with it. It's cheap enough.
    >>
    >> Karl S.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lord Atticrat, Duke of Solderwicke, Duc'Taep, and Les Isles Du Theatre
    >>



  6. Re: Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side)

    Ray Ellerd wrote in message news:...
    > steve
    > Dual booting is real easy. Partition your hard drive into two partitions.
    > Next install your windows OS just like normal on one of the partitions.
    > Finally download and install a linux distro like fedora and install to the
    > second partition. It will give you an oportunity to add the windows
    > install to your Grub welcome screen. That's it...it's that simple.
    >
    >
    > dagl
    >
    >
    > On Fri, 21 Nov 2003 16:26:29 +0000, StvyLife wrote:
    >
    > > k thanks, I thought i had a real modem.
    > > I guess I'll have to go with the dualboot system; but i am gonna need help
    > > to do that.
    > > I wish I fisically know someone who had done so I can take my labtop to
    > > them.
    > > Is the a step by step installation guide some where.
    > > given my specification, what version do I download and from where.
    > > are there tools to help me. how do i do the partions for dual boot.
    > > then what to I do next. and so on...
    > >
    > > stev
    > >
    > > "Karl S." wrote in message
    > > news:3Oevb.7693$sb4.7134@newsread2.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
    > >> On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 05:21:26 +0000, StvyLife wrote:
    > >>
    > >> > I would like to install Linux on my Sony notebook CNV1 (141A) 600Mhz
    > >> > 112MB Ram
    > >> > So will Linux understand the hard ware of the pc, how would I access the
    > >> > built in camera
    > >> > or operate the jog dial. Does it drag like windows, is 600 MHz good
    > >> > enough for it.
    > >> > Does it work with high-speed internet. Will it understand the pc card
    > >> > slot, or memory stick. what is the main function of Linux, does it have
    > >> > enough for me to forget windows.
    > >> > I am currently running windows ME and it frustrating enough and I just
    > >> > want to make sure that
    > >> > I am not leaping into bigger trouble. what are it limitation and is it
    > >> > friendly with ms docs.
    > >> >
    > >> > These are my question.
    > >> > thanks
    > >> >
    > >> > Steve
    > >> >
    > >> > ps. can someone clue on difference between the version out there
    > >>
    > >> Laptop computers, on the whole, contain a lot of proprietry hardware which
    > >> is designed to be used with Microsoft Windows and nothing else. You still
    > >> have a very good chance that your laptop will function with linux, due to
    > >> the continuing efforts to reverse-engineer that proprietary hardware and
    > >> build linux drivers for it.
    > >> The modem, if you have one, is probably a write-off. No laptop
    > >> manufacturer I know about uses real "hardware" modems any more. Instead,
    > >> they build what would more correctly be called a "sound card" and use
    > >> Microsoft Windows to emulate a modem. Some of these "Winmodems" can be
    > >> used under linux, given special drivers - and some can't.
    > >> As to the different distributions of linux? Difficult question. Mandrake
    > >> makes what is probably the easiest, most "Windows-like" one, but it uses
    > >> RedHat's "RPM" package system for software to be downloaded and installed.
    > >> As long as you install only that software that was designed to run with
    > >> your particular version number of your distribution, that shouldn't be too
    > >> great a problem. Otherwise, difficulties may occur.
    > >> All of the distributions seem to include a great deal of free software,
    > >> and would likely have anything you might wish to install, from web

    > browsers to
    > >> Office software, to art, to multimedia, to games.
    > >>
    > >> Go ahead and play with it. It's cheap enough.
    > >>
    > >> Karl S.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Lord Atticrat, Duke of Solderwicke, Duc'Taep, and Les Isles Du Theatre
    > >>

    steve,

    i just installed suse linux 8.2. i bought it from compusa for about
    $20. it comes with a manual and a few cd's. what i discovered is that
    the installer inspects your hardware allows you to make corrections
    and just goes. it installs on any free part of your drive and eats it
    all up.

    i have win98 as my primary partition i have a secondary drive that i
    partitioned. what linux did was install on the second drive on those
    portions that i did not format yet.

    so now i dual boot with a program linux installed on the boot
    partition.

    i was surprised to learn that there are a bevy of programs with the
    distribution. it is very user friendly has an open office
    distribution , games, movie editor, etc,etc.

    it is meant for the consumer and has plenty of programs to do things
    with.

    i am still learning, but it isnt bad so far.

    i got onto the net by running something called wvdial which is a
    simple interface to ppp.

  7. Re: Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side)

    I've just installed Mandrake Linux on my laptop and it was as easy as
    installing windows. I am running a dual boot system here also. (Xp and
    Mandrake). My laptop is a HP Pavilion N3290, just a 500mhz , but Mandrake
    runs great on it. As for the built in modem I have no idea if it works or
    not with Mandrake, as I have a Linksys ethernet pcmcia card and Mandrake
    set it up automatic. The only think that Mandrake didn't set up auto was
    the screen, but that was as easy as picking what resolution i wanted and
    that was it. I'd have to say if I'd know Mandrake was so easy to set up
    I'd have switched long ago, in fact i'm getting ready to delete my windows
    partition and have a 100% linux laptop.
    Also as for partitioning the harddrive, if your drive is a fat32 system,
    you don't even have to format the drive at first, just defrag it then
    start your install of Mandrake and it will partition it for you. All you
    have to do is tell it how much of the drive you want for linux and then it
    will set it up. That way you don't have to reinstall windows.
    Only little problem I seemed to run into was getting the sound working,
    but then that was my stupidity, one I ran the mixer and unmuted the
    sounded it worked great. Well hope I haven't rambled on to much, just am a
    very satisfied Mandrake user now (only been using a week).

  8. Re: Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side)

    david lopez wrote:

    > Ray Ellerd wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> steve
    >> Dual booting is real easy. Partition your hard drive into two
    >> partitions. Next install your windows OS just like normal on one of the
    >> partitions. Finally download and install a linux distro like fedora and
    >> install to the
    >> second partition. It will give you an oportunity to add the windows
    >> install to your Grub welcome screen. That's it...it's that simple.
    >>
    >>
    >> dagl
    >>
    >>
    >> On Fri, 21 Nov 2003 16:26:29 +0000, StvyLife wrote:
    >>
    >> > k thanks, I thought i had a real modem.
    >> > I guess I'll have to go with the dualboot system; but i am gonna need
    >> > help to do that.
    >> > I wish I fisically know someone who had done so I can take my labtop to
    >> > them.
    >> > Is the a step by step installation guide some where.
    >> > given my specification, what version do I download and from where.
    >> > are there tools to help me. how do i do the partions for dual boot.
    >> > then what to I do next. and so on...
    >> >
    >> > stev
    >> >
    >> > "Karl S." wrote in message
    >> > news:3Oevb.7693$sb4.7134@newsread2.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
    >> >> On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 05:21:26 +0000, StvyLife wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> > I would like to install Linux on my Sony notebook CNV1 (141A) 600Mhz
    >> >> > 112MB Ram
    >> >> > So will Linux understand the hard ware of the pc, how would I access
    >> >> > the built in camera
    >> >> > or operate the jog dial. Does it drag like windows, is 600 MHz good
    >> >> > enough for it.
    >> >> > Does it work with high-speed internet. Will it understand the pc
    >> >> > card slot, or memory stick. what is the main function of Linux, does
    >> >> > it have enough for me to forget windows.
    >> >> > I am currently running windows ME and it frustrating enough and I
    >> >> > just want to make sure that
    >> >> > I am not leaping into bigger trouble. what are it limitation and is
    >> >> > it friendly with ms docs.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > These are my question.
    >> >> > thanks
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Steve
    >> >> >
    >> >> > ps. can someone clue on difference between the version out there
    >> >>
    >> >> Laptop computers, on the whole, contain a lot of proprietry hardware
    >> >> which is designed to be used with Microsoft Windows and nothing else.
    >> >> You still have a very good chance that your laptop will function with
    >> >> linux, due to the continuing efforts to reverse-engineer that
    >> >> proprietary hardware and build linux drivers for it.
    >> >> The modem, if you have one, is probably a write-off. No laptop
    >> >> manufacturer I know about uses real "hardware" modems any more.
    >> >> Instead, they build what would more correctly be called a "sound card"
    >> >> and use Microsoft Windows to emulate a modem. Some of these
    >> >> "Winmodems" can be used under linux, given special drivers - and some
    >> >> can't. As to the different distributions of linux? Difficult question.
    >> >> Mandrake makes what is probably the easiest, most "Windows-like" one,
    >> >> but it uses RedHat's "RPM" package system for software to be
    >> >> downloaded and installed. As long as you install only that software
    >> >> that was designed to run with your particular version number of your
    >> >> distribution, that shouldn't be too great a problem. Otherwise,
    >> >> difficulties may occur. All of the distributions seem to include a
    >> >> great deal of free software, and would likely have anything you might
    >> >> wish to install, from web

    >> browsers to
    >> >> Office software, to art, to multimedia, to games.
    >> >>
    >> >> Go ahead and play with it. It's cheap enough.
    >> >>
    >> >> Karl S.
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> Lord Atticrat, Duke of Solderwicke, Duc'Taep, and Les Isles Du Theatre
    >> >>

    > steve,
    >
    > i just installed suse linux 8.2. i bought it from compusa for about
    > $20. it comes with a manual and a few cd's. what i discovered is that
    > the installer inspects your hardware allows you to make corrections
    > and just goes. it installs on any free part of your drive and eats it
    > all up.
    >
    > i have win98 as my primary partition i have a secondary drive that i
    > partitioned. what linux did was install on the second drive on those
    > portions that i did not format yet.
    >
    > so now i dual boot with a program linux installed on the boot
    > partition.
    >
    > i was surprised to learn that there are a bevy of programs with the
    > distribution. it is very user friendly has an open office
    > distribution , games, movie editor, etc,etc.
    >
    > it is meant for the consumer and has plenty of programs to do things
    > with.
    >
    > i am still learning, but it isnt bad so far.
    >
    > i got onto the net by running something called wvdial which is a
    > simple interface to ppp.


    wow various successfull installs. thanks for the tips everyone.
    well I guess the question is what flavor to install.
    I will try suse but i'll to try mandrake someday also.

    stev



  9. Re: Think about making the switch (does linux have any down side)

    dave I guess I should left the raw partion on my laptop. I wasn't sure what
    to do with it so I formatted it in fat32. I split in two for the purpose of
    dual booting.
    well we'll see what happens

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