Downloading Linux - Debian - Questions

This is a discussion on Downloading Linux - Debian - Questions ; I am a long-time (too long!) windows user looking for the light (Linux). After extensive searching of the groups, I have decided to try Debian (If thats a terrible idea, tell me). I went to download the ISO for Debian ...

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  1. Downloading Linux - Debian

    I am a long-time (too long!) windows user looking for the light
    (Linux). After extensive searching of the groups, I have decided to
    try Debian (If thats a terrible idea, tell me). I went to download the
    ISO for
    Debian (Debian.org) - and there are 6 of them! Why so many? How can I
    get a basic Linux operating system? Is Debian the wrong choice?
    Perhaps the first ISO is everything that is essential...is this the
    case?

    Thank you so much for reading this, any help or pointers would be

  2. Re: Downloading Linux - Debian

    Henry B wrote:

    > I am a long-time (too long!) windows user looking for the light
    > (Linux). After extensive searching of the groups, I have decided to
    > try Debian (If thats a terrible idea, tell me). I went to download the
    > ISO for
    > Debian (Debian.org) - and there are 6 of them! Why so many? How can I
    > get a basic Linux operating system? Is Debian the wrong choice?
    > Perhaps the first ISO is everything that is essential...is this the
    > case?
    >
    > Thank you so much for reading this, any help or pointers would be


    For your first Linux I'd suggest you go with Red, Mand., or Sus. For one,
    they all have slam-dunk installers that will probably pop Linux in without
    you having to do any tinkering (especially disk partitioning.) Also, while
    Debian is solid, if you want the "stable" version, you get some really,
    really old versions of supporting software.... KDE 2.x, etc. (Unless they
    have a new version out.) You could try the "testing" version as that is
    also usually very stable but it's called "testing" for a reason.

    I run Slackware 9.1 but I would only suggest it to someone who has a basic
    Linux background.... knowing how to edit text files, and a bit of "how
    Linux works" experience. You really can't go from being a Windows user to a
    Slack user, IMO. Mandrake or RH makes the transition easier... and if you
    like those distros, why even bother with anything more "basic?"

    The nice things about Red Hat, et.al. is that they look simple on the
    outside. But in order to have tons of GUI helpers (like Windows) things get
    very crowded and "jammed up" under the hood such that it becomes impossible
    to "work on it" unless you are a real mechanic. Slack and Deb are much
    "simpler" to figure things out... but the cost is that you need to have a
    bit of knowledge because you don't have a pretty screen to click buttons
    and drop downs on... you have to edit text files. Personally, I'm more
    comfortable working with a well-commented text file than wading through
    multiple layers of screens, clicking and choosing and not knowing what is
    going on.

    If I were you I'd buy the "generic" Mandrake or RH CDs from
    www.cheapbytes.com and start with that. If you want to go the Deb or Slack
    route later on, you will be in a good position to do so. Same with Gentoo,
    which is now all the rage. Once they get a real installer I might take a
    look at it as well. But Slack is straightforward, is solid as a rock, and
    runs well if you know how to drive it.

    Al


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