ASCII / Boot Font ? - Questions

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Thread: ASCII / Boot Font ?

  1. ASCII / Boot Font ?

    New to Linux, Mandrake 9.0.
    Learning C - When I list the ASCII characters 0-255 I do not get the
    standard set. I belive that this may have to do with the Font type loaded
    at boot, which I belive is Latin ??. How do I go about changing the font
    set for the boot?

    TIA
    RBH

  2. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    On Mon, 08 Sep 2003 13:06:20 GMT, "rbh" wrote:

    >New to Linux, Mandrake 9.0.
    >Learning C - When I list the ASCII characters 0-255


    Stop right there. There are no ASCII characters in the 128-255 range; ASCII only
    lives in the 0-127 range. If you are using characters beyond 0-127, then you are
    /not/ using ASCII.

    >I do not get the standard set.


    What "standard set"? Do you mean the ASCII standard set?

    In any case, how does what you get differ from the "standard set"?

    > I belive that this may have to do with the Font type loaded
    >at boot, which I belive is Latin ??. How do I go about changing the font
    >set for the boot?
    >
    >TIA
    >RBH


    --
    Lew Pitcher
    IT Consultant, Enterprise Technology Solutions
    Toronto Dominion Bank Financial Group

    (Opinions expressed are my own, not my employers')

  3. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    Thanks for the reply Lew,

    While it is true that ASCII originaly was from 0-127, it has an
    extended set that goes from 128-255. ( see http://www.asciitable.com )
    As can bee seen the extended set has the double line character that can be
    used for drawing boxes. I do not get these, I get what appears to be
    common intenational diacrital letters. Below is a C file that if you type
    into a text editer and then save with the dot c extention ( i.e. ascii.c )
    and then compile it with gcc you will get an exacutable ( "a.out" )
    that outputs the ascii list to your screen.
    It is not as pretty as the above URL, but it works):

    /* ASCII demo */
    #include
    int counter = 0;
    char ascii = 0;
    main()
    {
    for(counter=0;counter<256;counter++)
    {
    printf("\nThis is the counter: %d",counter);
    printf("\tThis is the ASCII Symbol: %c\n", ascii);
    ascii = counter;
    }
    printf("\n\nEnd\n");
    }

    A slight aside I seem to notice I cannot run the output "a.out" from the
    x11 ice window manager terminal I have to use the terminal from KDE,
    dont know why either.

    I would be curious to know what your output is?
    Do you get the double line characters?

    RBH






    On Mon, 08 Sep 2003 13:34:08 +0000, Lew Pitcher wrote:

    > On Mon, 08 Sep 2003 13:06:20 GMT, "rbh" wrote:
    >
    >>New to Linux, Mandrake 9.0.
    >>Learning C - When I list the ASCII characters 0-255

    >
    > Stop right there. There are no ASCII characters in the 128-255 range; ASCII only
    > lives in the 0-127 range. If you are using characters beyond 0-127, then you are
    > /not/ using ASCII.
    >
    >>I do not get the standard set.

    >
    > What "standard set"? Do you mean the ASCII standard set?
    >
    > In any case, how does what you get differ from the "standard set"?
    >
    >> I belive that this may have to do with the Font type loaded
    >>at boot, which I belive is Latin ??. How do I go about changing the font
    >>set for the boot?
    >>
    >>TIA
    >>RBH



  4. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    rbh wrote:
    > Thanks for the reply Lew,
    >
    > While it is true that ASCII originaly was from 0-127, it has an
    > extended set that goes from 128-255. ( see http://www.asciitable.com )


    No, it hasn't. See the ANSI or ISO specifications for ASCII
    If you can't afford the prices ANSI and ISO charge for a copy of the ASCII
    standard, you can check out the ECMA website; the ECMA-6 standard document
    description of ASCII is free for downloading in PDF format
    (http://www.ecma-international.org/pu...s/Ecma-006.htm)

    > As can bee seen the extended set has the double line character that can be
    > used for drawing boxes.


    So, you don't want ASCII. You want one of those /other/ charactersets that
    mirror ASCII in their low order 128 codepoints, but have their own
    characters in the upper 128 codepoints. You want a characterset like CP850,
    not ASCII.

    > I do not get these, I get what appears to be
    > common intenational diacrital letters.


    That tells me that you are using a characterset like ISO8859-1, not ASCII or
    CP850.

    FWIW, http://anubis.dkuug.dk/jtc1/sc2/ is the home to the ISO/IEC JTC1/SC2
    Characterset Working Group, and they maintain an extensive catalog of
    charactersets. Take a look at http://anubis.dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps/
    This web page includes the codepoint mappings for
    ASCII (http://anubis.dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps/ASCII),
    CP850 (http://anubis.dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps/CP850), and
    ISO8859-1 (http://anubis.dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps/ISO-8859-1)
    and many others.



    [snip]
    > I would be curious to know what your output is?


    I'm not even going to try it. It's output will be dependant on the
    characterset that the presentation layer (video driver or Xterm or whatever)
    is using. Run the same code twice, once in an Xterm and once on the console,
    and you'll get two different results.

    > Do you get the double line characters?


    So, what you want to do is figure out how to tell the system to use the
    CP850 characterset, rather than the characterset that it currently uses.
    This likely will involve the system telling the video hardware what
    characterset to use.

    Since there are at least three different situations to which your problem
    could apply:

    1) At boot, where you want your boot loader to display box drawing
    characters

    2) In a Linux console, where you want standard console (non-gui) operations
    to display box drawing characters, or

    3) In X, where you want an X client application to display box drawing
    characters

    Each of these situations have different solutions for changing characterset.
    Tell us which situation you want to address, and we'll be able to help you
    make the changes.


    --

    Lew Pitcher, IT Consultant, Application Architecture
    Enterprise Technology Solutions, TD Bank Financial Group

    (Opinions expressed here are my own, not my employer's)


  5. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    Once again thank you Lew for replying,

    I should say right out thanks for the correction.
    You are correct in saying that ASCII only goes from 0-127.
    I more correctly should have asked how to change code pages.
    I would like to know how to go about doing all three of the ways
    you have indicated below, but I am doing most of my writing in the
    terminal window of KDE ( I asssume is an xwindow (?) ) so I will ask for
    that. I would like eventualy to use the console to do this, so that would
    be a bonus.

    TAIA,
    RBH


    On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 09:08:29 +0000, Lew Pitcher wrote:

    > rbh wrote:
    >> Thanks for the reply Lew,
    >>
    >> While it is true that ASCII originaly was from 0-127, it has an
    >> extended set that goes from 128-255. ( see http://www.asciitable.com )

    >
    > No, it hasn't. See the ANSI or ISO specifications for ASCII
    > If you can't afford the prices ANSI and ISO charge for a copy of the ASCII
    > standard, you can check out the ECMA website; the ECMA-6 standard document
    > description of ASCII is free for downloading in PDF format
    > (http://www.ecma-international.org/pu...s/Ecma-006.htm)
    >
    >> As can bee seen the extended set has the double line character that can be
    >> used for drawing boxes.

    >
    > So, you don't want ASCII. You want one of those /other/ charactersets that
    > mirror ASCII in their low order 128 codepoints, but have their own
    > characters in the upper 128 codepoints. You want a characterset like CP850,
    > not ASCII.
    >
    >> I do not get these, I get what appears to be
    >> common intenational diacrital letters.

    >
    > That tells me that you are using a characterset like ISO8859-1, not ASCII or
    > CP850.
    >
    > FWIW, http://anubis.dkuug.dk/jtc1/sc2/ is the home to the ISO/IEC JTC1/SC2
    > Characterset Working Group, and they maintain an extensive catalog of
    > charactersets. Take a look at http://anubis.dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps/
    > This web page includes the codepoint mappings for
    > ASCII (http://anubis.dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps/ASCII),
    > CP850 (http://anubis.dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps/CP850), and
    > ISO8859-1 (http://anubis.dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps/ISO-8859-1)
    > and many others.
    >
    >
    >
    > [snip]
    >> I would be curious to know what your output is?

    >
    > I'm not even going to try it. It's output will be dependant on the
    > characterset that the presentation layer (video driver or Xterm or whatever)
    > is using. Run the same code twice, once in an Xterm and once on the console,
    > and you'll get two different results.
    >
    >> Do you get the double line characters?

    >
    > So, what you want to do is figure out how to tell the system to use the
    > CP850 characterset, rather than the characterset that it currently uses.
    > This likely will involve the system telling the video hardware what
    > characterset to use.
    >
    > Since there are at least three different situations to which your problem
    > could apply:
    >
    > 1) At boot, where you want your boot loader to display box drawing
    > characters
    >
    > 2) In a Linux console, where you want standard console (non-gui) operations
    > to display box drawing characters, or
    >
    > 3) In X, where you want an X client application to display box drawing
    > characters
    >
    > Each of these situations have different solutions for changing characterset.
    > Tell us which situation you want to address, and we'll be able to help you
    > make the changes.



  6. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 09:08:29 -0400, Lew Pitcher
    wrote:

    >rbh wrote:
    >> Thanks for the reply Lew,
    >>
    >> While it is true that ASCII originaly was from 0-127, it has an
    >> extended set that goes from 128-255. ( see http://www.asciitable.com )



    Aren't the characters 128-255 the "IBM" extended ASCII ?

    Harv

  7. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    rbh wrote:
    [snip]
    >
    > /* ASCII demo */
    > #include
    > int counter = 0;
    > char ascii = 0;
    > main()
    > {
    > for(counter=0;counter<256;counter++)
    > {
    > printf("\nThis is the counter: %d",counter);
    > printf("\tThis is the ASCII Symbol: %c\n", ascii);
    > ascii = counter;
    > }
    > printf("\n\nEnd\n");
    > }
    >
    > A slight aside I seem to notice I cannot run the output "a.out" from the
    > x11 ice window manager terminal I have to use the terminal from KDE,
    > dont know why either.
    >
    > I would be curious to know what your output is?
    > Do you get the double line characters?


    For what it's worth

    1) In an xterm, nothing above 127 shows, and the program hangs the xterm at
    about codepoint 157

    2) At the console, I get both accented characters and block drawing characters
    in codepoints 128 through 255

    3) when I change the console font to russian (koi8 characterset), I get cyrillic
    characters and block drawing characters in codepoints 128 through 255

    As I said before, you want to change the characterset your display is using; the
    code (or character constants) don't have to change.

    If you are talking about a /console/ font, you can use the setfont(8) command to
    set the appropriate characterset and font (look in your
    /usr/share/kbd/consolefonts directory for the charactersets/fonts that you can use).






    --
    Lew Pitcher

    Master Codewright and JOAT-in-training
    Registered Linux User #112576 (http://counter.li.org/)
    Slackware - Because I know what I'm doing.


  8. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    Harvie Powis wrote:

    > On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 09:08:29 -0400, Lew Pitcher
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>rbh wrote:
    >>
    >>>Thanks for the reply Lew,
    >>>
    >>> While it is true that ASCII originaly was from 0-127, it has an
    >>>extended set that goes from 128-255. ( see http://www.asciitable.com )

    >
    >
    >
    > Aren't the characters 128-255 the "IBM" extended ASCII ?



    You don't mean "characters", you mean "codepoints". The "characters" are the
    glyphs that are associated to "codepoints" in a "coded characterset". There
    are many different "coded charactersets", each using different "characters"
    for the same "code points".

    As for "characters 128-255", yes, IBM's unsanctioned, non-standard
    "extension" to the ASCII characterset used those codepoints. But, so did
    Commodore, with their PET-ASCII, even though Commodore used different
    "characters" for those code points. Heck, even IBM mainframes use codepoints
    0 through 255, but /that/ characterset doesn't look at all like ASCII; only
    a handfull of the control character ("effector") codepoints are the same
    between ASCII and EBCDIC, none of the printing characters are the same at all.



    --

    Lew Pitcher, IT Consultant, Application Architecture
    Enterprise Technology Solutions, TD Bank Financial Group

    (Opinions expressed here are my own, not my employer's)


  9. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    Thanks again Lew,

    With a bit more reading I was able to get the characters I wanted.
    I used loadkeys in a new instance. Still not sure how to load in an
    xwindow - is it xmodmap? what will happen is I use loadkeys in a KDE
    terminal window.

    TAIA
    RBH

    On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 20:25:42 +0000, Lew Pitcher wrote:

    > rbh wrote:
    > [snip]
    >>
    >> /* ASCII demo */
    >> #include
    >> int counter = 0;
    >> char ascii = 0;
    >> main()
    >> {
    >> for(counter=0;counter<256;counter++)
    >> {
    >> printf("\nThis is the counter: %d",counter);
    >> printf("\tThis is the ASCII Symbol: %c\n", ascii);
    >> ascii = counter;
    >> }
    >> printf("\n\nEnd\n");
    >> }
    >>
    >> A slight aside I seem to notice I cannot run the output "a.out" from the
    >> x11 ice window manager terminal I have to use the terminal from KDE,
    >> dont know why either.
    >>
    >> I would be curious to know what your output is?
    >> Do you get the double line characters?

    >
    > For what it's worth
    >
    > 1) In an xterm, nothing above 127 shows, and the program hangs the xterm at
    > about codepoint 157
    >
    > 2) At the console, I get both accented characters and block drawing characters
    > in codepoints 128 through 255
    >
    > 3) when I change the console font to russian (koi8 characterset), I get cyrillic
    > characters and block drawing characters in codepoints 128 through 255
    >
    > As I said before, you want to change the characterset your display is using; the
    > code (or character constants) don't have to change.
    >
    > If you are talking about a /console/ font, you can use the setfont(8) command to
    > set the appropriate characterset and font (look in your
    > /usr/share/kbd/consolefonts directory for the charactersets/fonts that you can use).



  10. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    Groovy hepcat rbh was jivin' on Mon, 08 Sep 2003 20:39:35 GMT in
    comp.os.linux.questions.
    Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?'s a cool scene! Dig it!

    >Thanks for the reply Lew,
    >
    > While it is true that ASCII originaly was from 0-127, it has an
    >extended set that goes from 128-255. ( see http://www.asciitable.com )


    That's not ASCII. It is the IBM Extended Character Set, a superset
    of ASCII. ASCII is a 7 bit character set. It cannot possibly have
    values in the range 128 to 255.

    >As can bee seen the extended set has the double line character that can be
    >used for drawing boxes. I do not get these, I get what appears to be
    >common intenational diacrital letters. Below is a C file that if you type
    >into a text editer and then save with the dot c extention ( i.e. ascii.c )
    >and then compile it with gcc you will get an exacutable ( "a.out" )
    >that outputs the ascii list to your screen.


    No, it doesn't. It displays whatever 8 bit character set happens to
    be used by the terminal or window in which it is executed. If a 7 bit
    character set is used, then you have a problem. Most likely you have
    one of a number of ISO character sets.

    >It is not as pretty as the above URL, but it works):
    >
    >/* ASCII demo */
    >#include
    >int counter = 0;
    >char ascii = 0;


    Put these variables in main(). There is absolutely no reason for
    them to be defined at file scope.
    Also, make ascii unsigned. It is implementation defined whether
    (vanilla) char is treated as signed or unsigned. Your char may not be
    able to represent values in the range 128 to 255. The resulting
    behaviour is undefined. So don't take chances. The most likely outcome
    is that you get negative values.
    What's worse, if a char is signed, and its value does wrap to
    negative values when incremented above 127, you are trying to print
    negative character values. This causes undefined behaviour. There is a
    degree of likeliness that it will crash.

    >main()


    Since this isn't comp.lang.c, I won't bother to mention that the new
    version of the C standard mandates that a return type be specified. Of
    course, the return type of main() must be int. By chance, that's
    precicely what it is (by the old version of the standard - superceded
    in the new version, of course) when no return type is explicitly
    specified.

    >{
    > for(counter=0;counter<256;counter++)
    > {
    > printf("\nThis is the counter: %d",counter);
    > printf("\tThis is the ASCII Symbol: %c\n", ascii);
    > ascii = counter;


    Wouldn't that make more sense *before* the output?

    > }
    > printf("\n\nEnd\n");


    Remember, main() returns an int. You should actually return
    something, not just leave it to chance. Portable return values for
    main() are 0 and the macros EXIT_SUCCESS and EXIT_FAILURE defined in
    stdlib.h.

    return 0;
    >}
    >
    >A slight aside I seem to notice I cannot run the output "a.out" from the
    >x11 ice window manager terminal I have to use the terminal from KDE,
    >dont know why either.


    I bet you're trying to execute it like so:

    a.out[enter]

    And I bet you somehow have KDE set up to include the current directory
    in the execution path. Remove the line that adds the current directory
    to the execution path in whatever script is doing so, and execute your
    program in the current directory like this:

    ../a.out[enter]

    --

    Dig the even newer still, yet more improved, sig!

    http://alphalink.com.au/~phaywood/
    "Ain't I'm a dog?" - Ronny Self, Ain't I'm a Dog, written by G. Sherry & W. Walker.
    I know it's not "technically correct" English; but since when was rock & roll "technically correct"?

  11. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    Lew Pitcher wrote:
    [snip]
    > So, what you want to do is figure out how to tell the system to use the
    > CP850 characterset, rather than the characterset that it currently uses.
    > This likely will involve the system telling the video hardware what
    > characterset to use.
    >
    > Since there are at least three different situations to which your
    > problem could apply:
    >
    > 1) At boot, where you want your boot loader to display box drawing
    > characters


    Here, I don't know. lilo doesn't seem to have any way to change the
    display characterset/font, and I don't know /what/ grub offers.
    You may have to introduce coding changes into the boot loader to invoke
    the BIOS video character generator load function (INT 10H, AH=11H) using
    characterset and font data from (say) the appropriate
    /usr/share/kbd/consolefonts font file.


    > 2) In a Linux console, where you want standard console (non-gui) operations
    > to display box drawing characters, or


    The setfont(8) command will load different fonts for different
    charactersets into the console character driver. For your box drawing
    characters, you probably want something like

    setfont cp850-8x16

    Take a look in the /usr/share/kbd/consolefonts directory for a list of
    fonts installed on your system.

    > 3) In X, where you want an X client application to display box drawing
    > characters


    Here X resources or toolkit parameters for the client app will influence
    the characterset. For instance

    xterm -fn koi8x16

    launches xterm with a cyrillic characterset. Similarly, if your
    ..Xdefaults file contains

    *Font: koi8x16

    then the default characterset and font for all your X applications to a
    specific Cyrillic characterset. (See X(7) for some of the details on
    charactersets and resources in X). FWIW, I can't find a CP850 equivalent
    in my X fonts directories (/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/*); if I understand
    the naming convention correctly, xfontsel(1) should show CP850
    charactersets under the "cp850" registry.


    --
    Lew Pitcher

    Master Codewright and JOAT-in-training
    Registered Linux User #112576 (http://counter.li.org/)
    Slackware - Because I know what I'm doing.


  12. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 22:38:17 GMT, "rbh" wrote:

    >Thanks again Lew,
    >
    > With a bit more reading I was able to get the characters I wanted.
    >I used loadkeys in a new instance.


    loadkeys(1) isn't exactly what you want, although (I guess) it will install
    alternate display charactersets as a side effect. The primary use of loadkeys(1)
    is to change your /keyboard/ from one mapping to another. By using loadkeys(1),
    you may have altered your keyboard such that it no longer produces the proper
    codepoints for the character glyphs shown on the keycaps (i.e. you get an
    accented e' when you hit the e key).

    This may be acceptable to you; I don't know. If you really didn't intend to
    change your keyboard along with your display, you should use setfont(8) command.

    --
    Lew Pitcher
    IT Consultant, Enterprise Technology Solutions
    Toronto Dominion Bank Financial Group

    (Opinions expressed are my own, not my employers')

  13. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    Thank you Shaggy,

    I have just started to write in C day 10 in 21. My book is old, and
    proably outdated.

    On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 00:38:05 +0000, Peter "Shaggy" Haywood wrote:

    snip

    > That's not ASCII. It is the IBM Extended Character Set, a superset
    > of ASCII. ASCII is a 7 bit character set. It cannot possibly have
    > values in the range 128 to 255.


    I see this, I wrote/spoke before I thought it through.
    >
    >>As can bee seen the extended set has the double line character that can be
    >>used for drawing boxes. I do not get these, I get what appears to be
    >>common intenational diacrital letters. Below is a C file that if you type
    >>into a text editer and then save with the dot c extention ( i.e. ascii.c )
    >>and then compile it with gcc you will get an exacutable ( "a.out" )
    >>that outputs the ascii list to your screen.

    >
    > No, it doesn't. It displays whatever 8 bit character set happens to
    > be used by the terminal or window in which it is executed. If a 7 bit
    > character set is used, then you have a problem. Most likely you have
    > one of a number of ISO character sets.


    Being new to the Linux enviroment, may I ask what command will display the
    current codepage / sharacter set?
    >
    >>It is not as pretty as the above URL, but it works):
    >>
    >>/* ASCII demo */
    >>#include
    >>int counter = 0;
    >>char ascii = 0;

    >
    > Put these variables in main(). There is absolutely no reason for
    > them to be defined at file scope.


    I thought this when staring out but it was the way I was shown.

    > Also, make ascii unsigned. It is implementation defined whether
    > (vanilla) char is treated as signed or unsigned. Your char may not be
    > able to represent values in the range 128 to 255. The resulting
    > behaviour is undefined. So don't take chances. The most likely outcome
    > is that you get negative values.
    > What's worse, if a char is signed, and its value does wrap to
    > negative values when incremented above 127, you are trying to print
    > negative character values. This causes undefined behaviour. There is a
    > degree of likeliness that it will crash.
    >

    Thanks, after reading the above I see the error (or possable error) that
    can be caused.

    >>main()

    >
    > Since this isn't comp.lang.c, I won't bother to mention that the new
    > version of the C standard mandates that a return type be specified. Of
    > course, the return type of main() must be int. By chance, that's
    > precicely what it is (by the old version of the standard - superceded
    > in the new version, of course) when no return type is explicitly
    > specified.
    >
    >>{
    >> for(counter=0;counter<256;counter++)
    >> {
    >> printf("\nThis is the counter: %d",counter);
    >> printf("\tThis is the ASCII Symbol: %c\n", ascii);
    >> ascii = counter;

    >
    > Wouldn't that make more sense *before* the output?
    >

    I thought so originaly, but thought since I set the counter to 0 in
    the for() iniation that adding and setting the counter fit at the end.
    >> }
    >> printf("\n\nEnd\n");

    >
    > Remember, main() returns an int. You should actually return
    > something, not just leave it to chance. Portable return values for
    > main() are 0 and the macros EXIT_SUCCESS and EXIT_FAILURE defined in
    > stdlib.h.
    >
    > return 0;
    >>}
    >>

    It crossed my mind that the main should have a exit value for error
    trapping purposes but to tell you the truth I have not gotten that far in
    to my book to put all the parts togeather yet. I will try to look at
    comp.lang.c and glean a bit more.

    >>A slight aside I seem to notice I cannot run the output "a.out" from the
    >>x11 ice window manager terminal I have to use the terminal from KDE,
    >>dont know why either.

    >
    > I bet you're trying to execute it like so:
    >
    > a.out[enter]
    >

    I was/am.

    > And I bet you somehow have KDE set up to include the current directory
    > in the execution path. Remove the line that adds the current directory
    > to the execution path in whatever script is doing so,


    I am not sure what you mean. I am writing, compiling and executing all in
    the same directory (ie home/user/cdata )

    and execute your program in the current directory like this:
    >
    > ./a.out[enter]

    I was able to get an output in console using this, I will try in xwindow.


    Thanks for all the help and info.

    RBH

  14. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    Thanks again Lew,

    I will try the following and see how they work,
    Thanks for taking the time and effort with me. I am going on vacation so
    will not have access to a Linux Box for a while but will monitor the NG's.
    Have a great day and thanks again.

    RBH


    On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 21:28:23 +0000, Lew Pitcher wrote:

    > Lew Pitcher wrote:
    > [snip]
    >> So, what you want to do is figure out how to tell the system to use the
    >> CP850 characterset, rather than the characterset that it currently uses.
    >> This likely will involve the system telling the video hardware what
    >> characterset to use.
    >>
    >> Since there are at least three different situations to which your
    >> problem could apply:
    >>
    >> 1) At boot, where you want your boot loader to display box drawing
    >> characters

    >
    > Here, I don't know. lilo doesn't seem to have any way to change the
    > display characterset/font, and I don't know /what/ grub offers.
    > You may have to introduce coding changes into the boot loader to invoke
    > the BIOS video character generator load function (INT 10H, AH=11H) using
    > characterset and font data from (say) the appropriate
    > /usr/share/kbd/consolefonts font file.
    >
    >
    >> 2) In a Linux console, where you want standard console (non-gui) operations
    >> to display box drawing characters, or

    >
    > The setfont(8) command will load different fonts for different
    > charactersets into the console character driver. For your box drawing
    > characters, you probably want something like
    >
    > setfont cp850-8x16
    >
    > Take a look in the /usr/share/kbd/consolefonts directory for a list of
    > fonts installed on your system.
    >
    >> 3) In X, where you want an X client application to display box drawing
    >> characters

    >
    > Here X resources or toolkit parameters for the client app will influence
    > the characterset. For instance
    >
    > xterm -fn koi8x16
    >
    > launches xterm with a cyrillic characterset. Similarly, if your
    > .Xdefaults file contains
    >
    > *Font: koi8x16
    >
    > then the default characterset and font for all your X applications to a
    > specific Cyrillic characterset. (See X(7) for some of the details on
    > charactersets and resources in X). FWIW, I can't find a CP850 equivalent
    > in my X fonts directories (/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/*); if I understand
    > the naming convention correctly, xfontsel(1) should show CP850
    > charactersets under the "cp850" registry.



  15. Re: ASCII / Boot Font ?

    Lew Pitcher wrote:

    > Lew Pitcher wrote:
    > [snip]
    > Here, I don't know. lilo doesn't seem to have any way to change the
    > display characterset/font, and I don't know /what/ grub offers.

    [snip]

    If anyone is *really* interested then, "urpmi lilo-doc"
    and "rpm -ql lilo-doc".

    --
    Sig goes here...
    Peter D.

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