beginners problems - Protocols

This is a discussion on beginners problems - Protocols ; Hello, Im trying to make a connection from a win98 machine to a Win Xp machine trough Kermit. But al what i try , no connections. When i use the dialer with a telnet or another template all i get ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: beginners problems

  1. beginners problems

    Hello,

    Im trying to make a connection from a win98 machine to a Win Xp machine
    trough Kermit. But al what i try , no connections.

    When i use the dialer with a telnet or another template all i get is no
    connection. The two computers are connected to each other trough a router.

    How do i make a connection ?? I read all the faq en manuals but i can't find
    the answer. Please help me.

    Roelof



  2. Re: beginners problems

    Roelof Wobben wrote:
    >
    > Im trying to make a connection from a win98 machine to a Win Xp

    machine
    > trough Kermit. But al what i try , no connections.
    >
    > When i use the dialer with a telnet or another template all i get is

    no
    > connection. The two computers are connected to each other trough a

    router.
    >
    > How do i make a connection ?? I read all the faq en manuals but i

    can't find
    > the answer. Please help me.


    What are you trying to connect to? If you are trying to Telnet from A
    to B for example, you need a telnet demon listening on port 23 on B to
    connect to.

    If you want to do Kermit file transfers between A and B, you need a
    Kermit on each machine - one connecting and one answering the connect.
    You can use "host mode" or IKSD for the listener, but there are some
    unresolved issues with IKSD.

    The simplest way is to have a K95 on each machine and tell one to
    listen on a port (e.g. 3000) and enter server mode upon connect with

    set network type tcp
    set host /server * 3000

    and then connect from the other machine with

    set network type tcp
    set host xxxx 3000

    where xxxx is either the name or the IP address of the other machine.
    Then, after the second machine is connected, you can do rcd, rdir, get,
    put, etc. to navigate and transfer files.

    --
    Mark Sapiro msapiro at value net The highway is for gamblers,
    San Francisco Bay Area, California better use your sense - B. Dylan


  3. Re: beginners problems


    "Mark Sapiro" schreef in bericht
    news:1100397145.238051.4410@c13g2000cwb.googlegrou ps.com...
    > Roelof Wobben wrote:
    >>
    >> Im trying to make a connection from a win98 machine to a Win Xp

    > machine
    >> trough Kermit. But al what i try , no connections.
    >>
    >> When i use the dialer with a telnet or another template all i get is

    > no
    >> connection. The two computers are connected to each other trough a

    > router.
    >>
    >> How do i make a connection ?? I read all the faq en manuals but i

    > can't find
    >> the answer. Please help me.

    >
    > What are you trying to connect to? If you are trying to Telnet from A
    > to B for example, you need a telnet demon listening on port 23 on B to
    > connect to.


    Im trying to connect machine A en B wih the reason that i will catch up the
    boot-messages of machine B.
    With that i can hopefully find the reason why my keyboard is freezing on
    startup.


    > If you want to do Kermit file transfers between A and B, you need a
    > Kermit on each machine - one connecting and one answering the connect.
    > You can use "host mode" or IKSD for the listener, but there are some
    > unresolved issues with IKSD.
    >
    > The simplest way is to have a K95 on each machine and tell one to
    > listen on a port (e.g. 3000) and enter server mode upon connect with
    >
    > set network type tcp
    > set host /server * 3000
    >
    > and then connect from the other machine with
    >
    > set network type tcp
    > set host xxxx 3000
    >
    > where xxxx is either the name or the IP address of the other machine.
    > Then, after the second machine is connected, you can do rcd, rdir, get,
    > put, etc. to navigate and transfer files.
    >
    > --
    > Mark Sapiro msapiro at value net The highway is for gamblers,
    > San Francisco Bay Area, California better use your sense - B. Dylan
    >




  4. Re: beginners problems

    oke,

    I tried it but with no succes,

    On the Wind machine i did a :

    set network type tcp
    set host / server * 3000

    on the Linux machine i changed the grub bootloader with the following :

    serial --unit=0 --speed=9600 --word=8 --parity=no --stop=1

    terminal --timeout=10 serial console

    kernel ..... console-tty0 console-ttS0

    What do i wrong ??

    roelof

    "Roelof Wobben" schreef in bericht
    news:cn7aog$8bq$1@news2.zwoll1.ov.home.nl...
    >
    > "Mark Sapiro" schreef in bericht
    > news:1100397145.238051.4410@c13g2000cwb.googlegrou ps.com...
    >> Roelof Wobben wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Im trying to make a connection from a win98 machine to a Win Xp

    >> machine
    >>> trough Kermit. But al what i try , no connections.
    >>>
    >>> When i use the dialer with a telnet or another template all i get is

    >> no
    >>> connection. The two computers are connected to each other trough a

    >> router.
    >>>
    >>> How do i make a connection ?? I read all the faq en manuals but i

    >> can't find
    >>> the answer. Please help me.

    >>
    >> What are you trying to connect to? If you are trying to Telnet from A
    >> to B for example, you need a telnet demon listening on port 23 on B to
    >> connect to.

    >
    > Im trying to connect machine A en B wih the reason that i will catch up
    > the boot-messages of machine B.
    > With that i can hopefully find the reason why my keyboard is freezing on
    > startup.
    >
    >
    >> If you want to do Kermit file transfers between A and B, you need a
    >> Kermit on each machine - one connecting and one answering the connect.
    >> You can use "host mode" or IKSD for the listener, but there are some
    >> unresolved issues with IKSD.
    >>
    >> The simplest way is to have a K95 on each machine and tell one to
    >> listen on a port (e.g. 3000) and enter server mode upon connect with
    >>
    >> set network type tcp
    >> set host /server * 3000
    >>
    >> and then connect from the other machine with
    >>
    >> set network type tcp
    >> set host xxxx 3000
    >>
    >> where xxxx is either the name or the IP address of the other machine.
    >> Then, after the second machine is connected, you can do rcd, rdir, get,
    >> put, etc. to navigate and transfer files.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Mark Sapiro msapiro at value net The highway is for gamblers,
    >> San Francisco Bay Area, California better use your sense - B. Dylan
    >>

    >
    >




  5. Re: beginners problems


    So you are trying to capture the boot message of machine B:

    - what OS's boot message are you going to capture?

    - Are you booting that OS using grub on machine B?

    I think it would be much easier to connect machine A and B
    directly with a serial cable rather than relying on TCP.
    I doubt there are many OSs for PCs that can emits boot message via TCP
    connection.


  6. Re: beginners problems


    "ishikawa" schreef in bericht
    news:1100439753.715121@duron...
    >
    > So you are trying to capture the boot message of machine B:
    >
    > - what OS's boot message are you going to capture?


    Im trying to capture boot messages from a linux system.
    >
    > - Are you booting that OS using grub on machine B?


    Yes, I am
    >
    > I think it would be much easier to connect machine A and B
    > directly with a serial cable rather than relying on TCP.
    > I doubt there are many OSs for PCs that can emits boot message via TCP
    > connection.
    >




  7. Re: beginners problems

    Roelof Wobben wrote:
    > "ishikawa" schreef in bericht
    > news:1100439753.715121@duron...
    >
    >>So you are trying to capture the boot message of machine B:
    >>
    >> - what OS's boot message are you going to capture?

    >
    >
    > Im trying to capture boot messages from a linux system.
    >
    >> - Are you booting that OS using grub on machine B?

    >
    >
    > Yes, I am
    >
    >>I think it would be much easier to connect machine A and B
    >>directly with a serial cable rather than relying on TCP.
    >>I doubt there are many OSs for PCs that can emits boot message via TCP
    >>connection.
    >>

    >



    I am not familiar with grub, but I doubt if it can emit message with TCP
    during boot. So I think you definitely should use kermit.

    So I think you should prepare a so called NULL modem cable to
    connect machine A and machine B (linux).

    - Using grub, you should add "debug" command option to linux kernel
    because otherwise no boot message is diverted serial line if I am not
    mistaken.

    The reason was explained by a kind poster when I had trouble booting
    2.6.9-rc2 (it turns out there was a bug in tmpfs support, which was
    subsequently fixed).

    To quote a private message:

    > that you do not see all messages is probably caused by console logging
    > code - /dev/console logs only messages which have priority above
    > console_loglevel...


    > ... [a slight omission] ...


    >
    > After system boot console_loglevel is visible/changeable through
    > /proc/sys/kernel/print - first number in this file is console_loglevel.
    >
    > Default value is 7 - which blocks KERN_DEBUG messages. If you boot
    > with 'debug' kernel option, console_loglevel is set to 10, providing
    > you with *all* messages (and for completness if you boot with 'quiet',
    > you'll get only really serious messages, with priority 4 or higher).
    >
    > So I think that document you were reading should say:
    >
    > 4. To see ALL THE CONSOLE MESSAGES during boot on the TARGET
    >
    > Boot kernel on target with debug option, like
    >
    > loadlin 269rc2 console=ttyS0,9600n8 debug


    This was for using loadin, another bootloader that is invoked from DOS.


    Below is a short memo I concoted after hearing a few tips from mailing
    list and from a private e-mail.

    This gives you a general idea of how to capture boot message from linux.

    I think you might be able to fill in the details.
    I am using a different boot loader and so not quite familiar with
    how to use grab's feature.


    PS: Note on serial console setup with loadlin.

    I studied the excellent guide posted to linux-kernel in August, 2003
    regarding how to set up the serial console.

    However, I am using LOADLIN and this boot utiltiy seems to
    require a certain modification to the setup mentioned in the post.
    (The post assumed "lilo").

    Also, the linking of /dev/console to /dev/ttyS0 is not quite correct
    according to the later tips I obtained. (I explained it above in this
    post.)

    The doc below assumes cu to capture the boot message, but you can
    certainly use kermit and that is what I would have done.

    --- quote from the post and my comment ---

    > Your need a NULL modem serial cable available
    > from any computer store.
    >
    > Install uucp - I use on the HOST :
    >
    > uucp-1.06.1-33.7.2.
    >
    > Also , LILO is broken on some machines and ignores
    > serial input so make sure you use at least
    >
    > lilo-21.6-71
    >
    > On the TARGET
    >
    > 1. Connect the serial ports together ( COM1->COM1 ) with
    > the serial cable .
    >
    > 2. Modify LILO to use serial line on the TARGET
    > add to lilo.conf:
    > append="console=ttyS0,9600n8 console=tty0 "
    > serial=0,9600N8
    >
    > Run lilo


    CI's comment starts here: I use loadlin and so
    needed to change this part for loadlin
    and kernel 2.4.22 as follows. [I tested the serial
    console setup under 2.4.22 and it took me a long time to set this up.]

    I needed to omit console=tty0 portion for testing the setup under 2.4.22.
    If the second console= part is present, the initial portion shown
    on the screen namely,

    BIOS-provided physical RAM map:
    BIOS-e820: 0000000000000000 - 000000000009fc00 (usable)
    ... omitted ..

    disappeared somewhere and not seen on the CRT of the original PC
    nor on the serial console screen. They simply disappeared and
    so the setup was useless! (All I got was the login prompt: after a while.)

    Under 2.4.22, if I remove the later command options, and use a command
    line like this, (omitting console=tty0 serial=0,9600N8. serial=
    .... must be a command option to "lilo" itself.)

    loadlin lin2422.ip6 root=/dev/sda6 ro vga=3 scsihosts=sym53c8xx:tmscsim
    console=ttyS0,9600n8

    I DID get a partial portion of the messages originally shown on the
    original PC on the serial console, but only partially. ONLY the
    messages AFTER `init' starts are shown on serial console. So
    "BIOS-provided ..." message lines and those many lines that follow
    until `init' starts are not shown. Why? I have no idea.

    (CI's comment in 2004: maybe this has something to do with "debug" option I
    explained above.)

    However, it turns out 2.6.0-test10 handles the kernel message
    output to serial console in a slightly different manner, and
    "BIOS-provided ..." messages and all lines that follow are dumped to serial
    console immediately without any problem after
    my setup [ step 4 below included ].

    Again I have no idea why, but as you can see in
    the attached log, the serial console for message dumping purposes
    seems to work just fine with 2.6.0-test10. (In any case,
    /etc/syslog.conf DID have kern.* /dev/ttyS0 for the log.)

    > 3. Add to /etc/inittab on the HOST
    >
    > S0:s12345:respawn:/sbin/agetty 9600 ttyS0
    >
    > 4. To see ALL THE CONSOLE MESSAGES during boot on the TARGET
    >

    *> mv /dev/console /dev/console.org
    *> ln /dev/ttyS0 /dev/console

    The above is not quite the correct way according to the later tip
    which I mentioned above.
    You should add "debug" and every console message should appear
    on /dev/ttyS0. You don't have to rename and link /dev/cosole to
    /dev/ttyS0.

    CI's comment: If you DO want to rename
    the /dev/console as in the original post marked with "*",
    this had to be done AFTER disabling devfs and rebooting
    2.4.22 on my PC. (for obvious reasons to those who use devfs. /dev
    directory after devfsd is invoked is a "virtual directory" and mv and
    other modifications are NOT allowed.)


    > 5. Start uucp on the HOST:
    >
    > cu -l /dev/ttyS0 -s 9600
    >


    My second PC is a window98 PC. I disabled the TTY ports
    on that PC long time ago, and so it took me a while
    to enable the tty ports, and configure it under win98.
    Hyperterminal happily tries to open non-functioning com1 and
    com2 ports and simply crashed under that platform and so
    it took me a while to figure out that the tty ports were not
    configured at all!

    I was afraid that win98 PC was not fast enough to capture all
    the boot message, but it was.

    A kermit on a second linux PC should be satisfactory.

    > 6. Boot your target
    >
    > ///
    >
    > John Donnelly AT HP DOT com

    --- end quote ---


    There are some issues like
    - using the right cable (NULL modem cable)
    - making sure that you get the correct tty port on the back of
    the computer. They can be incorrect easily.
    - The syntax of specifying tty port is very different from one
    bootloader to the other, and
    - different major linux version seems to handle console logging
    slightly differently (or not).

    So a little experimentaion probably will be necessary.

+ Reply to Thread