using telephone keys to acknowledge a call? - Protocols

This is a discussion on using telephone keys to acknowledge a call? - Protocols ; Hi kermit Gurus, I'm trying to build the following 'scenario': I have a gsm modem (Falcom A2D, with a German Telecom D1 SIM card) which is connected through a serial line to a linux box. With kermit (700196, Debian Linux ...

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  1. using telephone keys to acknowledge a call?

    Hi kermit Gurus,

    I'm trying to build the following 'scenario':
    I have a gsm modem (Falcom A2D, with a German Telecom D1 SIM card)
    which is connected through a serial line to a linux box. With kermit
    (700196, Debian Linux 2.4.18) I'm able to connect to the modem, input
    the PIN, getting network registration status, network field strength
    and so on (with special AT commands) and I'm able to dial out to other
    mobile phones or to conventional telephone network.
    So far, I'm happy ;-)

    What I would like to have is, that the called person can use it's
    phone keys, enter a combination of for example '#42' and use this, to
    'acknowledge' that he/she had received the call and based on that,
    doing further logic in the kermit script, eg. call another number or
    trying 3 more times if he did'nt answer, then sending SMS,... and so
    on, or using different keys resulting in different 'actions'

    The whole thing will then be integrated in the big brother network and
    system monitor framework (www.bb4.com)

    So what I would like to ask is, if this possible using kermit and if
    so, some hints about how to do this, and if not :-(, some hints for
    alternative linux software, which can do that?

    I must admit, that I'm not very familiar with kermit, kermit
    scripting, GSM modems and so on...

    sincerely
    Klaus
    -kpb>

  2. Re: using telephone keys to acknowledge a call?

    In article ,
    Klaus-Peter Boden wrote:
    : I'm trying to build the following 'scenario':
    : I have a gsm modem (Falcom A2D, with a German Telecom D1 SIM card)
    : which is connected through a serial line to a linux box. With kermit
    : (700196, Debian Linux 2.4.18) I'm able to connect to the modem, input
    : the PIN, getting network registration status, network field strength
    : and so on (with special AT commands) and I'm able to dial out to other
    : mobile phones or to conventional telephone network.
    : So far, I'm happy ;-)
    :
    : What I would like to have is, that the called person can use it's
    : phone keys, enter a combination of for example '#42' and use this, to
    : 'acknowledge' that he/she had received the call and based on that,
    : doing further logic in the kermit script, eg. call another number or
    : trying 3 more times if he did'nt answer, then sending SMS,... and so
    : on, or using different keys resulting in different 'actions'
    :
    : The whole thing will then be integrated in the big brother network and
    : system monitor framework (www.bb4.com)
    :
    : So what I would like to ask is, if this possible using kermit and if
    : so, some hints about how to do this, and if not :-(, some hints for
    : alternative linux software, which can do that?
    :
    A modem that uses the AT command set, or any other text-based command
    set, is simply a character device to Kermit. In Kermit, if you enter
    CONNECT (terminal) mode, then whatever you type at the keyboard is sent
    out the serial port to the device. The only hint is that first you might
    need to tell Kermit to:

    set carrier-watch off

    in case you need to communicate with the modem's command processor directly
    when there is no Carrier Detect signal from the modem,

    But a modem is not the same as a telephone, and characters from the serial
    port are not the same as telephone buttons. Therefore you must use the
    modem command that simulates Tone dialing, which is ATDT. So, for example,
    to simulate '#42' you would type "ATDT#42" and then press the Enter or
    Return key.

    As to scripting, you can get an introduction here:

    http://www.columbia.edu/kermit/ckscripts.html

    In this case, it's a matter of knowing when to send the ATDT commands.
    Kermit can only work with characters to and from the device. It can't
    "hear" tones, beeps, bongs, or voice instructions. But sometimes the
    modem can -- for example, some modems have a "wait for bong" command:

    ATDT$#42

    You'll have to read your modem manual to find out what is supported by
    your modem. As long as text comes out of the modem to indicate what is
    happening, you can script interactions reliably. Otherwise, you'll have
    to insert pauses to wait until it is safe to send the next command.

    - Frank

  3. Re: using telephone keys to acknowledge a call?

    Frank da Cruz wrote in message news:...
    > In article ,
    > Klaus-Peter Boden wrote:
    > : I'm trying to build the following 'scenario':
    > : I have a gsm modem (Falcom A2D, with a German Telecom D1 SIM card)
    > : which is connected through a serial line to a linux box. With kermit
    > : (700196, Debian Linux 2.4.18) I'm able to connect to the modem, input
    > : the PIN, getting network registration status, network field strength
    > : and so on (with special AT commands) and I'm able to dial out to other
    > : mobile phones or to conventional telephone network.
    > : So far, I'm happy ;-)
    > :
    > : What I would like to have is, that the called person can use it's
    > : phone keys, enter a combination of for example '#42' and use this, to
    > : 'acknowledge' that he/she had received the call and based on that,
    > : doing further logic in the kermit script, eg. call another number or
    > : trying 3 more times if he did'nt answer, then sending SMS,... and so
    > : on, or using different keys resulting in different 'actions'


    > A modem that uses the AT command set, or any other text-based command
    > set, is simply a character device to Kermit. In Kermit, if you enter
    > CONNECT (terminal) mode, then whatever you type at the keyboard is sent
    > out the serial port to the device. The only hint is that first you might
    > need to tell Kermit to:
    >
    > set carrier-watch off
    >
    > in case you need to communicate with the modem's command processor directly
    > when there is no Carrier Detect signal from the modem,
    >
    > But a modem is not the same as a telephone, and characters from the serial
    > port are not the same as telephone buttons. Therefore you must use the
    > modem command that simulates Tone dialing, which is ATDT. So, for example,
    > to simulate '#42' you would type "ATDT#42" and then press the Enter or
    > Return key.
    >
    > As to scripting, you can get an introduction here:
    >
    > http://www.columbia.edu/kermit/ckscripts.html
    >
    > In this case, it's a matter of knowing when to send the ATDT commands.
    > Kermit can only work with characters to and from the device. It can't
    > "hear" tones, beeps, bongs, or voice instructions. But sometimes the
    > modem can -- for example, some modems have a "wait for bong" command:
    >
    > ATDT$#42
    >
    > You'll have to read your modem manual to find out what is supported by
    > your modem. As long as text comes out of the modem to indicate what is
    > happening, you can script interactions reliably. Otherwise, you'll have
    > to insert pauses to wait until it is safe to send the next command.
    >

    Thank you very much for the info!

    So if I understand you correct, it means that this is a feature of the
    modem and there have to be some modem-specific AT commands with which
    I can 'read' the keys, the user pressed (or whatever)...

    OK, next I will have to call the modem manufacturer if he supports
    those 'wait for bong' commands.

    Klaus
    -kpb>
    > - Frank


  4. Re: using telephone keys to acknowledge a call?

    In article ,
    Klaus-Peter Boden wrote:
    :
    : So if I understand you correct, it means that this is a feature of the
    : modem and there have to be some modem-specific AT commands with which
    : I can 'read' the keys, the user pressed (or whatever)...
    :
    There are modem-specific commands that tell the modem to do what
    the telephone would do if you pressed dialing keys. ATDT123 tells the
    modem to send the DTMF tones that correspond to Touch-Tone telephone
    1, 2, and 3 keys.

    The modem can't read keystrokes from the PC keyboard. It's the other way
    around: the PC software (Kermit in this case) sends data (keystrokes,
    scripted, or otherwise) to the modem. When the modem is in command mode,
    you have to send it legal AT commands.

    : OK, next I will have to call the modem manufacturer if he supports
    : those 'wait for bong' commands.
    :
    "Wait for bong" usually refers to credit card tones. This might not be
    what you have to wait for in your case. The real question is whether the
    modem provides sufficient information to the computer, or has its own
    commands, that will allow you to automate a process that relies on audible
    tones.

    - Frank

  5. Re: using telephone keys to acknowledge a call?

    > The modem can't read keystrokes from the PC keyboard. It's the other way
    > around: the PC software (Kermit in this case) sends data (keystrokes,
    > scripted, or otherwise) to the modem. When the modem is in command mode,
    > you have to send it legal AT commands.


    The DTMF decoding is described on
    http://www.gsm-modem.de/dtmf_decoder_gsm.html . You can do it with
    your sound card as well, if you wire the audio line of the GSM device
    to your PC right. Software for DTMF decoding you will find in the
    Internet.
    Regards
    Meff

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