File transfer from Linux to Win XP over USB - basic questions - Protocols

This is a discussion on File transfer from Linux to Win XP over USB - basic questions - Protocols ; Howdy: I'm contemplating the purchase of a notebook computer that runs some version of Linux. Possibly Linpus. The task at hand is to set up a cable connection between the notebook and my desktop PC, which is running Windows XP, ...

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Thread: File transfer from Linux to Win XP over USB - basic questions

  1. File transfer from Linux to Win XP over USB - basic questions

    Howdy: I'm contemplating the purchase of a notebook computer that
    runs some version of Linux. Possibly Linpus. The task at hand is to
    set up a cable connection between the notebook and my desktop PC,
    which is running Windows XP, over which I can simply and easily
    transfer files (mostly text, but perhaps binary as well) on a fairly
    regular basis -- every other day or so.

    Questions:
    1) Are there versions of Kermit available (say, like, on the Columbia
    U. site http://www.columbia.edu/kermit) that support this operation?

    1a) If there is a ver that works under Linux (or one of its
    manifestations), would it be necessary to recompile it from source on
    my particular system?

    2) What sort of cabling would I need to do this? I know nothing about
    USB connections at all -- whether they even support this sort of
    application. I probably will not have an RS-232 serial port on the
    notebook, but I understand that there exist adapters that will connect
    USB to an RS-232 wire. Would such a contraption mess up the kermit
    operation?

    3) Does anyone know about file format compatibility issues between
    Linux and Windows? Do I have to worry about whether, say, a text file
    or an RTF file created on the Linux side would even be readable/system-
    compatible with the Windows XP OS? In particular, compatible with
    the Windows file system -- NTFS style. One would hope that the Kermits
    on each end would somehow handle this transparently.

    thanks
    Alex





  2. Re: File transfer from Linux to Win XP over USB - basic questions

    On Sep 11, 12:39*pm, alexander wrote:
    > Howdy: *I'm contemplating the purchase of a notebook computer that
    > runs some version of Linux. Possibly Linpus. The task at hand is to
    > set up a cable connection between the notebook and my desktop PC,
    > which is running Windows XP, over which I can simply and easily
    > transfer files (mostly text, but perhaps binary as well) on a fairly
    > regular basis -- every other day or so.
    >
    > Questions:
    > 1) Are there versions of Kermit available (say, like, on the Columbia
    > U. sitehttp://www.columbia.edu/kermit) that support this operation?



    Yes. You want Kermit-95 on
    the Windows XP box and C-Kermit <http://www.columbia.edu/kermit/
    ck80.html> on the Linux box.


    > 1a) If there is a ver that works under Linux (or one of its
    > manifestations), would it be necessary to recompile it from source on
    > my particular system?



    There are many pre-built C-Kermit binaries at <http://www.columbia.edu/
    kermit/ck80binaries.html#linux>. One of these may be suitable for your
    hardware/OS platform, but if not, Kermit is fairly straightforward to
    make from source .


    > 2) What sort of cabling would I need to do this? I know nothing about
    > USB connections at all -- whether they even support this sort of
    > application. I probably will not have an RS-232 serial port on the
    > notebook, but I understand that there exist adapters that will connect
    > USB to an RS-232 wire. Would such a contraption mess up the kermit
    > operation?



    There are a few ways to approach this. The old way was to connect two
    computers via RS-232C ports using a null modem cable www.columbia.edu/kermit/cable.html>. And yes, there are USB to RS-232
    adapters that would work. In this setup, each computer sees the other
    as a modem.

    The more modern way is to use ethernet connections via a router or the
    internet itself. Even if you have to purchase a router to implement
    this, the increased speed is probably worth it.


    > 3) Does anyone know about file format compatibility issues between
    > Linux and Windows? Do I have to worry about whether, say, a text file
    > or an RTF file created on the Linux side would even be readable/system-
    > compatible with the Windows XP OS? *In particular, compatible *with
    > the Windows file system -- NTFS style. One would hope that the Kermits
    > on each end would somehow handle this transparently.



    Yes, the Kermits are very good about this - one of the major
    advantages of using Kermit over other methods.

    --
    (for email use this address please - you can figure it out)

    Mark Sapiro mark at msapiro net Any clod can have the facts;
    San Francisco Bay Area, California having opinions is an art. -
    C. McCabe, The Fearless
    Spectator

  3. Re: File transfer from Linux to Win XP over USB - basic questions

    alexander wrote:

    > 1) Are there versions of Kermit available (say, like, on the Columbia
    > U. site http://www.columbia.edu/kermit) that support this operation?


    You can just install gkermit on the Linux machine, and a kermit capable
    terminal emulator on the Microsoft Windows machine. (I think TeraTerm,
    PuTTY, or Reflections would suit this.)

    > 1a) If there is a ver that works under Linux (or one of its
    > manifestations), would it be necessary to recompile it from source on
    > my particular system?


    gkermit is available on most Linux boxes. There is not problem here.

    > 2) What sort of cabling would I need to do this?


    You could just use a crossover network cable, if there is no RS232 port
    on the machine.

    > 3) Does anyone know about file format compatibility issues between
    > Linux and Windows?


    Files created in Microsoft Windows may have CRLF line ends, whereas on
    Linux based systems, they have just LF line ends.

    There is an ambiguity in the RTF standard, which means that RTF files
    created on Microsoft Windows may not be readable on GNU/Linux based
    systems, even though the files are to the standards stated.

    > One would hope that the Kermits on each end would somehow handle this

    transparently.

    Line ending can sometimes be manipulated by the terminal emulator,
    though translation of RTF files would not be transparent.

    I normally just convert received text files to the appropriate format.

    I stopped using RTF, due to compatiblity problems with this format, and
    the open source editor not being as mature as Atlantis Nova, which was
    the RTF editor of choice on Microsoft Windows based systems.

    I now use Abiword on both Microsoft Windows and on GNU/Linux, and this
    has made documents more portable between platforms, that the RTF
    documents.

    You could however run Atlantis Nova in Wine, if you wanted to continue
    using the RTF format.

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley,
    393 Quinton Road West,
    Quinton, BIRMINGHAM.
    B32 1QE.

  4. Re: File transfer from Linux to Win XP over USB - basic questions

    On Sep 12, 2:50*pm, markhob...@hotpop.donottypethisbit.com (Mark
    Hobley) wrote:
    > alexander wrote:
    > > 1) Are there versions of Kermit available (say, like, on the Columbia
    > > U. sitehttp://www.columbia.edu/kermit) that support this operation?

    >
    > You can just install gkermit on the Linux machine, and a kermit capable
    > terminal emulator on the Microsoft Windows machine. (I think TeraTerm,
    > PuTTY, or Reflections would suit this.)
    >
    > > 1a) If there is a ver that works under Linux (or one of its
    > > manifestations), would it be necessary to recompile it from source on
    > > my particular system?

    >


    .... [snip] ...

    Very helpful. Thanks so much to both Marks!

    best
    Alex


  5. Re: File transfer from Linux to Win XP over USB - basic questions

    On 2008-09-12, Mark Hobley wrote:
    : alexander wrote:
    :
    :> 1) Are there versions of Kermit available (say, like, on the Columbia
    :> U. site http://www.columbia.edu/kermit) that support this operation?
    :
    : You can just install gkermit on the Linux machine, and a kermit capable
    : terminal emulator on the Microsoft Windows machine. (I think TeraTerm,
    : PuTTY, or Reflections would suit this.)
    :
    Last time I looked, PuTTY did not include Kermit protocol. Teraterm did but
    it was not a very good implementation. I believe Reflections supports
    Kermit protocol, but it's very expensive.

    There is really no reason to use G-Kermit on Linux instead of C-Kermit.
    G-Kermit is a bare-bones minimal Kermit protocol implementation that was
    produced to satisfy the demands of license purists. C-Kermit is generally
    faster and it does more, and anybody who wants to use it can download it
    for free and use it all they want to (they just can't turn around and
    sell it to somebody else).

    :> 1a) If there is a ver that works under Linux (or one of its
    :> manifestations), would it be necessary to recompile it from source on
    :> my particular system?
    :
    : gkermit is available on most Linux boxes. There is not problem here.
    :
    C-Kermit is available for all Linux boxes, as Mark S said. At the present
    moment the best place to get it is here:

    http://www.columbia.edu/kermit/ckdaily.html

    The version you'll find here has a few updates that might be necessary for
    certain Linux distributions.

    In any case, for best results with file transfer, if you are going to be using
    Kermit protocol, you should use real Kermit software on each end of the
    connection because it works better and it's supported. The Kermit software
    for Windows is Kermit 95:

    http://www.columbia.edu/kermit/k95.html

    :> 2) What sort of cabling would I need to do this?
    :
    : You could just use a crossover network cable, if there is no RS232 port
    : on the machine.
    :
    About serial-port cables, see:

    http://www.columbia.edu/kermit/cable.html

    :> 3) Does anyone know about file format compatibility issues between
    :> Linux and Windows?
    :
    : Files created in Microsoft Windows may have CRLF line ends, whereas on
    : Linux based systems, they have just LF line ends.
    :
    Kermit 95 and C-Kermit can be used together to transfer files between
    Linux and Windows (and most any other pair of platforms) without the user
    having to be concerned with these issues, or having to worry about the
    difference between text and binary files. All necessary conversions are
    done automatically.

    : There is an ambiguity in the RTF standard, which means that RTF files
    : created on Microsoft Windows may not be readable on GNU/Linux based
    : systems, even though the files are to the standards stated.
    :
    :> One would hope that the Kermits on each end would somehow handle this
    :> transparently.
    :
    As far as Kermit is concerned, RTF files are text files. Kermit does not
    convert application-specific formats between applications or platforms;
    neither does any other file-transfer program that I know of. It can, however,
    (and does) convert between text-file record formats and text-file character
    encodings (e.g. Windows code pages, ISO 8859, UTF8, etc).

    - Frank

  6. Re: File transfer from Linux to Win XP over USB - basic questions

    Frank Da Cruz wrote:

    > (they just can't turn around and sell it to somebody else).


    The licence is also prevents free distribution of a modified versions,
    and requires modifications to be sent to the C-kermit team.

    The gkermit version is open source, and does not have these
    restrictions.

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley,
    393 Quinton Road West,
    Quinton, BIRMINGHAM.
    B32 1QE.

  7. Re: File transfer from Linux to Win XP over USB - basic questions

    On 2008-09-25, Mark Hobley wrote:
    : Frank da Cruz wrote:
    :> (they just can't turn around and sell it to somebody else).
    :
    : The licence is also prevents free distribution of a modified versions,
    : and requires modifications to be sent to the C-kermit team.
    :
    And why wouldn't you want to have one single set of consistent, supportable
    source code, instead of a multiple of forks and branches that are all
    different? Support requests for Kermit come here, but if they are about
    a modified version that we haven't even seen, how can we support it?

    We've been developing and supporting C-Kermit since 1985, and all fixes are
    gratefully accepted. If you make a fix but you don't send it in, then the
    next release of C-Kermit won't have the fix you'll either be stuck with the
    old version, or you'll have to put the fix in again.

    - Frank

  8. Re: File transfer from Linux to Win XP over USB - basic questions

    Frank da Cruz wrote:

    > And why wouldn't you want to have one single set of consistent, supportable
    > source code, instead of a multiple of forks and branches that are all
    > different?


    The whole appeal of open source is the ability to fork and branch. This
    prevents vendor lock-in. If you are not happy with a change made by a
    vendor, you are free to fork the project.

    > Support requests for Kermit come here, but if they are about
    > a modified version that we haven't even seen, how can we support it?


    You can say the same about any open source project. But there are people
    supporting these packages all the time.

    If you want to support a version, just ask the user to install the
    version that you have distributed. If they choose another vendor, then
    just refer them to that vendor. Things are easy with open source.

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley,
    393 Quinton Road West,
    Quinton, BIRMINGHAM.
    B32 1QE.

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