dotnet newbie question - Programmer

This is a discussion on dotnet newbie question - Programmer ; I have been programming in C++/MFC/ATL for nearly 8 years now. I'm in the process of learning .NET and am wondering if I should use VisualC++.Net or C#. Are there any advantages/disadvantages going with one not the other OR does ...

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  1. dotnet newbie question

    I have been programming in C++/MFC/ATL for nearly 8 years now. I'm in the
    process of learning .NET and am wondering if I should use VisualC++.Net or
    C#. Are there any advantages/disadvantages going with one not the other OR
    does it not really matter????

    Thanks in Advance

    Jenny.



  2. Re: dotnet newbie question

    Conceptwise both languages are totally different. Your question is something
    like VC++ or Java

    -------------------------
    "Manish Agarwal"-
    http://personal.vsnl.com/mkag
    If replying to the group, please do not mail me.


    "Jenny" wrote in message
    news:ber8c2$cnp$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
    > I have been programming in C++/MFC/ATL for nearly 8 years now. I'm in the
    > process of learning .NET and am wondering if I should use VisualC++.Net or
    > C#. Are there any advantages/disadvantages going with one not the other

    OR
    > does it not really matter????
    >
    > Thanks in Advance
    >
    > Jenny.
    >
    >




  3. Re: dotnet newbie question

    hey
    I don't think so - C# and C++ are very similar languages, but C# is
    definitely more simply.
    One of suppose dot net platform is "language is only syntax" ... unimportant
    is if you write in C++ or C# because your managed code is compiled just
    during starting your application.
    C# is my choice ( VC++ .net 2002 don't have itegrated WindowsForms editor,
    VC# 2002 of course have it )....
    Sorry for my english - I'm elementary.

    Przemek Ma˝kowski
    Poland


    > Conceptwise both languages are totally different. Your question is

    something
    > like VC++ or Java
    >
    > "Jenny" wrote in message
    > news:ber8c2$cnp$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
    > > I have been programming in C++/MFC/ATL for nearly 8 years now. I'm in

    the
    > > process of learning .NET and am wondering if I should use VisualC++.Net

    or
    > > C#. Are there any advantages/disadvantages going with one not the other

    > OR
    > > does it not really matter????
    > >
    > > Thanks in Advance
    > >
    > > Jenny.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >




  4. Re: dotnet newbie question

    I think you should get away from the C++ personally, and get into C# full
    fledged. The syntax is simpler for one, which leads to less programmatic
    errors. It's less frustrating in a nutshell and there is tighter integration
    with .NET since there is less unmanaged code to muck with in C# as opposed
    to C++. On the other hand if you are into time critical systems etc, .NET
    C++ is the way to go.


    "Jenny" wrote in message
    news:ber8c2$cnp$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
    > I have been programming in C++/MFC/ATL for nearly 8 years now. I'm in the
    > process of learning .NET and am wondering if I should use VisualC++.Net or
    > C#. Are there any advantages/disadvantages going with one not the other

    OR
    > does it not really matter????
    >
    > Thanks in Advance
    >
    > Jenny.
    >
    >




  5. Re: dotnet newbie question

    I am currently in that transition myself. Let me just note that .Net is not
    a mature environment by any means yet. There are some things that have not
    been included thus far. As an example, try to find any class in C# that can
    open and use a serial port with, without using P/Invoke in the currently
    available versions of .Net.

    If you have any device interaction, sticking with C/C++ is a much better
    bet. Although C# can do it, you will be calling C/C++ routines. If your
    product is an office use only type program, then C# may be just for you. It
    all depends on how much work you want to do. If your considering a re-write
    in anycase to take advantage of the features that you now know about as
    requested by your customer(s), then attempt to note which technology will be
    around the longest and try to use that one. It looks like .Net is not a
    flash in the pan and will cause another round of re-writes by the industry.

    Phil


    "Jenny" wrote in message
    news:ber8c2$cnp$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
    > I have been programming in C++/MFC/ATL for nearly 8 years now. I'm in the
    > process of learning .NET and am wondering if I should use VisualC++.Net or
    > C#. Are there any advantages/disadvantages going with one not the other

    OR
    > does it not really matter????
    >
    > Thanks in Advance
    >
    > Jenny.
    >
    >




  6. Re: dotnet newbie question

    Just to step in here, would somebody mind telling me what the equivalent to
    free(void *) or delete(void *) is in C#?

    "Alvin Bruney" wrote in
    message news:e$N71YVSDHA.304@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > I think you should get away from the C++ personally, and get into C# full
    > fledged. The syntax is simpler for one, which leads to less programmatic
    > errors. It's less frustrating in a nutshell and there is tighter

    integration
    > with .NET since there is less unmanaged code to muck with in C# as opposed
    > to C++. On the other hand if you are into time critical systems etc, .NET
    > C++ is the way to go.
    >
    >
    > "Jenny" wrote in message
    > news:ber8c2$cnp$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
    > > I have been programming in C++/MFC/ATL for nearly 8 years now. I'm in

    the
    > > process of learning .NET and am wondering if I should use VisualC++.Net

    or
    > > C#. Are there any advantages/disadvantages going with one not the other

    > OR
    > > does it not really matter????
    > >
    > > Thanks in Advance
    > >
    > > Jenny.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >




  7. Re: dotnet newbie question

    My two cents: At the moment, a commitment to C# seems to be a commitment to
    the MS Windows platform. If you are or get proficient with C++, you leave
    open your access to other platforms, such as Unix, Linux, Mac, whatever. At
    the same time, you can still fully participate in .NET. So, opting for
    VC++.NET may be the more difficult choice, but gives you maximum
    flexibility.

    Jan Roelof



    "Jenny" wrote in message
    news:ber8c2$cnp$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
    > I have been programming in C++/MFC/ATL for nearly 8 years now. I'm in the
    > process of learning .NET and am wondering if I should use VisualC++.Net or
    > C#. Are there any advantages/disadvantages going with one not the other

    OR
    > does it not really matter????
    >
    > Thanks in Advance
    >
    > Jenny.
    >
    >




  8. Re: dotnet newbie question


    "Jan Roelof de Pijper" wrote in message
    news:O8sNZ8dfDHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > My two cents: At the moment, a commitment to C# seems to be a commitment

    to
    > the MS Windows platform. If you are or get proficient with C++, you leave
    > open your access to other platforms, such as Unix, Linux, Mac, whatever.

    At
    > the same time, you can still fully participate in .NET. So, opting for
    > VC++.NET may be the more difficult choice, but gives you maximum
    > flexibility.
    >
    > Jan Roelof
    >
    >
    >
    > "Jenny" wrote in message
    > news:ber8c2$cnp$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
    > > I have been programming in C++/MFC/ATL for nearly 8 years now. I'm in

    the
    > > process of learning .NET and am wondering if I should use VisualC++.Net

    or
    > > C#. Are there any advantages/disadvantages going with one not the other

    > OR
    > > does it not really matter????
    > >
    > > Thanks in Advance
    > >
    > > Jenny.
    > >


    Well spoken Jon. The ability to program cross platform with C/C++ on unix,
    linux, windows, embedded, etc opens all doors. Sticking with C# is much too
    restrictive these days.
    bob



  9. Re: dotnet newbie question

    "bob holder" wrote in message news:...
    > > "Jenny" wrote in message
    > > news:ber8c2$cnp$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
    > > > I have been programming in C++/MFC/ATL for nearly 8 years now. I'm in

    > the
    > > > process of learning .NET and am wondering if I should use VisualC++.Net

    > or
    > > > C#. Are there any advantages/disadvantages going with one not the other

    > OR
    > > > does it not really matter????
    > > >

    >
    > Well spoken Jon. The ability to program cross platform with C/C++ on unix,
    > linux, windows, embedded, etc opens all doors. Sticking with C# is much too
    > restrictive these days.
    > bob



    Other questions for dotnet:

    1) Which Windows platform does it support without the user downloading a
    the dotnet framework? Win9x? WinNT?, Win2k, or is it XP only?

    What's the smallest user OS requirements (without patch) for me to deploy a
    dotnet app?



    2) When I tried to instead some sample app a while back, it requires me to
    download about few differents frameworks, patches to OS, etc before I can even
    run the application. Is that still the case if I want to run any dotnet
    application?

    If so, the framework is as bad if not worst that Java.











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