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Bernd Muent wrote:

>
> But the interesting question is: why?


Why indeed? Why should there be multiple names on the one address? After
all, from a hosting point of view there is no shortage of IP addresses
(estimated of less than 100M web sites versus 4G addresses). There might
one day be a shortage of address for access if every household needs to
have its own IP address, but that is even more off topic that the rest
of this post...

> Every apache can handle 1000s of domains on one IP. Every ISP does this.


Curiously enough, not every ISP does. One of our businesses is a hosting
business and we give each customer at least 1 IP address. This allows:
- great flexibility in managing what the customer wants
- web site specific FTP etc
- reverse lookups
- complete separation of clients
- SSL
- protocols which require a double DNS lookup i.e. check name to IP and
IP to name
etc. etc.
My view is that the HTTP 1.1 virtual naming model has been over used (I
could go on endlessly about security etc...)

> Is this a limitation of the ftp protocol?


Yes, but more specifically, only (or at least as far as I am aware) the
HTTP protocol supports multiple names on one address.

Cheers

--
Simon L Jackson
SysWorks

+-
SysWorks
OpenVMS and Tru64 Unix * Development * Advice

Web: www.sysworks.com.au
Email: simon.jackson@sysworks.com.au

Office: +61 3 9411 4411
Support: +61 3 9411 4455
Fax: +61 3 9411 4499

Level 1
15 Bedford Street
Collingwood VIC 3066
Australia

P.O. Box 1464
Collingwood VIC 3066
Australia
+-

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http-equiv="Content-Type">


Bernd Muent wrote:


But the interesting question is: why?



Why indeed? Why should there be multiple names on the one address?
After all, from a hosting point of view there is no shortage of IP
addresses (estimated of less than 100M web sites versus 4G addresses).
There might one day be a shortage of address for access if every
household needs to have its own IP address, but that is even more off
topic that the rest of this post...

Every
apache can handle 1000s of domains on one IP. Every ISP does this.



Curiously enough, not every ISP does. One of our businesses is a
hosting business and we give each customer at least 1 IP address. This
allows:

- great flexibility in managing what the customer wants

- web site specific FTP etc

- reverse lookups

- complete separation of clients

- SSL

- protocols which require a double DNS lookup i.e. check name to IP and
IP to name

etc. etc.

My view is that the HTTP 1.1 virtual naming model has been over used (I
could go on endlessly about security etc...)

Is
this a limitation of the ftp protocol?



Yes, but more specifically, only (or at least as far as I am aware) the
HTTP protocol supports multiple names on one address.



Cheers



--

Simon L Jackson

SysWorks



+-

SysWorks

OpenVMS and Tru64 Unix * Development * Advice



Web: www.sysworks.com.au

Email: simon.jackson@sysworks.com.au



Office: +61 3 9411 4411

Support: +61 3 9411 4455

Fax: +61 3 9411 4499



Level 1

15 Bedford Street

Collingwood VIC 3066

Australia



P.O. Box 1464

Collingwood VIC 3066

Australia

+-





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