Minimum requirements for HTTP - PPP

This is a discussion on Minimum requirements for HTTP - PPP ; Hi there, We have implemented a Web application for a customer who has both users with existing internet connections and users with modems, but no ISPs. We have installed a Cisco 3620 router to terminate a PRI circuit on which ...

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Thread: Minimum requirements for HTTP

  1. Minimum requirements for HTTP

    Hi there,

    We have implemented a Web application for a customer who has both
    users with existing internet connections and users with modems, but no
    ISPs. We have installed a Cisco 3620 router to terminate a PRI
    circuit on which users will dial-in. The router dumps the users into
    the DMZ and gives them access to our Web app. Internet users also
    have access to the DMZ, so we're covered on that front.

    Does anyone have a list or a link to a site that explains what the
    minimum requirements are for a client to dial up establish a
    connection to our network to access our application (browser
    compatibility aside)? We have no problem using Windows Dial-up
    Networking to create a PPP connection bound to TCP/IP, but we want to
    make this as platform-independent as possible. The kinds of questions
    we have are:
    - what dialers are available for other OSes, like UNIX, Linux, Mac,
    AIX, and OS2?
    - are there other dialers for Windows besides DUN?
    - Is PPP required, or are there other protocols that work?

    If anyone knows of any generic how-to guides to setting up a client
    connection, that would be useful, too. The users will probably need a
    lot of hand holding.

    Thanks!

  2. Re: Minimum requirements for HTTP

    Your last question:

    dontsellthis@hotmail.com (lil fos) writes:
    >
    > - Is PPP required, or are there other protocols that work?
    >


    Can only be answered by the documentation for your Cisco box.
    I.e. whether the Cisco product can support other protocols
    besides PPP, and whether the configuration you've put into
    it will support other protocols.

    -Greg
    --
    Do NOT reply via e-mail.
    Reply in the newsgroup.

  3. Re: Minimum requirements for HTTP

    dontsellthis@hotmail.com (lil fos) writes:

    ]Hi there,

    ]We have implemented a Web application for a customer who has both
    ]users with existing internet connections and users with modems, but no
    ]ISPs. We have installed a Cisco 3620 router to terminate a PRI
    ]circuit on which users will dial-in. The router dumps the users into
    ]the DMZ and gives them access to our Web app. Internet users also
    ]have access to the DMZ, so we're covered on that front.

    ]Does anyone have a list or a link to a site that explains what the
    ]minimum requirements are for a client to dial up establish a
    ]connection to our network to access our application (browser
    ]compatibility aside)? We have no problem using Windows Dial-up
    ]Networking to create a PPP connection bound to TCP/IP, but we want to
    ]make this as platform-independent as possible. The kinds of questions
    ]we have are:
    ] - what dialers are available for other OSes, like UNIX, Linux, Mac,
    ]AIX, and OS2?
    ] - are there other dialers for Windows besides DUN?
    ] - Is PPP required, or are there other protocols that work?

    ppp would be prefered. Others (eg slip) are less well supported on every
    platform and is also harder to set up. ppp is also supported on all
    platforms.


    ]If anyone knows of any generic how-to guides to setting up a client
    ]connection, that would be useful, too. The users will probably need a
    ]lot of hand holding.

    Well there is www.theory.physics.ubc.ca/ppp-linux.html, but most of it
    is there in order to determine what the ISP wants in the way of ppp.
    since you control the ISP end (your router is acting as an ISP) you can
    determine what is required, and can notify your customers of what is
    required.

    For authentication, use chap MD5, not any of the MS versions of chap.
    You could use pap, but it is far less secure against eavesdropping.
    But do not use any of the possible MS proprietary protocols, ( MSChap 80
    or 81, or any of the compression/encryption that they offer). Being
    proprietary means they will NOT be supported on the other platforms.

    One of the ppp standards in the nonWindows world is the ppp originally
    developed at the Australian National University, and is thus called
    anu-ppp. (The maintainer is now with Samba.org, and the code is
    obtainable from ftp.samba.org). This is used(ie comes packaged with) in Linux and some of the
    commercial versions of Unix. I believe it also runs on OS2.

    If you set up ppp on the dialin end properly , it is amazingly simple to
    get working, and little handholding will be needed. Most of the problems
    come because of incompetence at the ISP end.



  4. Re: Minimum requirements for HTTP

    unruh@string.physics.ubc.ca (Bill Unruh) writes:
    > One of the ppp standards in the nonWindows world is the ppp originally
    > developed at the Australian National University, and is thus called
    > anu-ppp.


    Just to be pedantic about it ...

    That code actually originated at Carnegie-Mellon University (much of
    it by Greg Christy). ANU picked it up and maintained it, and produced
    the best-known distribution of it.

    --
    James Carlson, Solaris Networking
    Sun Microsystems / 1 Network Drive 71.234W Vox +1 781 442 2084
    MS UBUR02-212 / Burlington MA 01803-2757 42.497N Fax +1 781 442 1677

  5. Re: Minimum requirements for HTTP

    Thanks folks. This is good information. I guess I'm learning that
    PPP capability is very widespread and that I should worry less about a
    user's software limitations and more about their ability to configure
    their own machines. We are implementing a very basic system (much
    like an ISP, yes), and do not plan to make users jump through any
    hoops to establish a connection.

    Our users are typically operators who perform a prescribed sequence of
    keystrokes and mouseclicks that was written down for them by a vendor
    who is long gone, so we're concerned as to what kind of chaos will
    unfold when we ask them to abandon their vt100 emulators in favor of
    this new fangled Web technology.

    I haven't used a SLIP connection since my University supported only
    PINE email, and my only experience with HTTP on UNIX has been with
    workstations on a LAN. I'm glad to know I don't have to conjure up
    any of that to support our users.

  6. Re: Minimum requirements for HTTP

    dontsellthis@hotmail.com (lil fos) writes:
    > Thanks folks. This is good information. I guess I'm learning that
    > PPP capability is very widespread and that I should worry less about a
    > user's software limitations and more about their ability to configure
    > their own machines. We are implementing a very basic system (much
    > like an ISP, yes), and do not plan to make users jump through any
    > hoops to establish a connection.


    In that case, minimize the configuration that is necessary: make sure
    that your dial in lines either run PPP all the time, or are capable of
    automatic detection of PPP. After modem problems (which are rampant,
    but about which you can do nothing), unnecessary scripting caused by
    command-line interfaces presented to dial-up users is a big cause of
    trouble.

    > I haven't used a SLIP connection since my University supported only
    > PINE email, and my only experience with HTTP on UNIX has been with
    > workstations on a LAN. I'm glad to know I don't have to conjure up
    > any of that to support our users.


    There are likely to be other (perhaps smaller) issues that you'll need
    to deal with -- such as making sure that your clients have the right
    networking configuration information (not specifically related to
    PPP), such as DNS server addresses.

    --
    James Carlson, Solaris Networking
    Sun Microsystems / 1 Network Drive 71.234W Vox +1 781 442 2084
    MS UBUR02-212 / Burlington MA 01803-2757 42.497N Fax +1 781 442 1677

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