Re: ISP delay: login till ppp=up - PPP

This is a discussion on Re: ISP delay: login till ppp=up - PPP ; unruh@string.physics.ubc.ca (Bill Unruh) wrote: > eas-lab@absamail.co.za writes: > > ]I've observed this on several dial-up ISPs: > ]when the load is high (busy), which I can estimate, based on the weather, > ]time of day/week etc., there is a long ...

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Thread: Re: ISP delay: login till ppp=up

  1. Re: ISP delay: login till ppp=up

    unruh@string.physics.ubc.ca (Bill Unruh) wrote:

    > eas-lab@absamail.co.za writes:
    >
    > ]I've observed this on several dial-up ISPs:
    > ]when the load is high (busy), which I can estimate, based on the weather,
    > ]time of day/week etc., there is a long delay between when the modem
    > ]starts negotiating and when the last stage of the ppp is acheived/accepted.
    > ]Some times my (non-linux) ppp implementation times out.
    >
    > ]I think that when the server is busy and queing clients, there should be
    > ]'feed-back' to give the telco busy signal to clients. If not it's arrogant:
    > ]like letting people in to wait at the restaurant when you know there
    > ]won't be free tables for a long time.
    >
    > ]Are there facilities to avoid clients paying the entry fee [no busy barring]
    > ]and yet not being able to get on the net ?
    >
    >
    > Until you have logged in they do not know who you are, so it would be
    > hard to charge you.
    >

    The charge comes from the Telco: seconds-ticking once the ISP goes
    'off hook'. How does YOUR system work ?

    > Complain to your ISP.


    If you don't understand what I'm talking about, how will they ?

    > (actually, the ISP should run out of phone lines befor their servers
    > bogged down).
    >


    I guess the load ratio between servers and phone lines could
    vary much: depending on whether you get 'on line reading browsers',
    or like me - every thing is read offline.

    -- Chris Glur.



  2. Re: ISP delay: login till ppp=up

    In comp.protocols.ppp eas-lab@absamail.co.za wrote:
    > unruh@string.physics.ubc.ca (Bill Unruh) wrote:


    >> Until you have logged in they do not know who you are, so it would be
    >> hard to charge you.
    >>

    > The charge comes from the Telco: seconds-ticking once the ISP goes
    > 'off hook'. How does YOUR system work ?


    >> Complain to your ISP.


    > If you don't understand what I'm talking about, how will they ?


    The ISP very likely isn't in the U.S., or Canada, or other country
    with where a landline Telco doesn't charge by the minute. They should
    understand that a BUSY signal is preferable to a queue, if queuing is
    the problem, and that unhappy customers may be able to find an ISP that
    doesn't queue.

    >> (actually, the ISP should run out of phone lines befor their servers
    >> bogged down).


    > I guess the load ratio between servers and phone lines could
    > vary much: depending on whether you get 'on line reading browsers',
    > or like me - every thing is read offline.


    If loading is the problem then the ISP is probably running rather
    low quality PPP connection hosts, and/or have *way* too many clients
    per host.

    In either case, it seems to me that the solution is to find a decent
    ISP, one that doesn't have the problem - if possible... You certainly
    can't know before connecting what is going to happen (although you
    might guess on the basis of experience).

    There are some pppd lpc-max- options that might shorten
    the time to LCP termination, but all-in-all it sounds like a rather
    nasty situation.

    -- Clifford Kite Email: "echo xvgr_yvahk-ccc@ri1.arg|rot13"
    PPP-Q&A links, downloads: http://ckite.no-ip.net/
    /* The signal-to-noise ratio is too low in many [news] groups to make
    * them good candidates for archiving.
    * --- Mike Moraes, Answers to FAQs about Usenet */

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