need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX - Powerpc

This is a discussion on need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX - Powerpc ; Hi all, trying to install Debian "sarge" on my PPC7300 (+Sonnet G3, +MP540, but that should not matter here), I run into the following problems and would welcome any hint: Installation via the debian-installer runs fine (although I certainly would ...

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Thread: need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX

  1. need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX

    Hi all,
    trying to install Debian "sarge" on my PPC7300 (+Sonnet G3, +MP540, but
    that should not matter here), I run into the following problems and
    would welcome any hint:

    Installation via the debian-installer runs fine (although I certainly
    would like to get the main menu at any point and do not have to wait for
    an error to be able to invoke it). Started by BootX from the 2.6.8
    initrd.gz in the "Linux kernels" folder, everything runs smooth until
    the newly installed system asks for a reboot. After that (and putting
    the kernel included in the sarge netinstall CD image into "Linux
    Kernel"), when I do a reboot, the best thing I can get is a started
    kernel, right to the point where the Tux appears (although with strange
    colors, but I'm sure I could correct that later). Then, nothing more.
    With the 2.4.18 kernel from the same netinstall CD (and other sources as
    well), I do not even get that far. After trying to boot from bootX, it
    does not even leave MacOs (except for a disappearing cursor and a
    "freeze"), and I hear the harddisk spin up. After a while, the computer
    reboots automatically.

    I tried many things, including an install of Woody (instead of Sarge)
    via the debian installer (seleting a ftp-netinstall from "stable"). I
    get this thing up and running in a way, when starting with a 2.2.20
    kernel in "Linux kernels" folder. However, important modules cannot load
    because modprobe does not find their path (it automatically tries in a
    path with the name of the wrong kernel). Manual changes in
    /lib/modutils/paths and a update-modules brings the right alternative
    path into /etc/modules.conf, but at reboot it complains about this entry
    as an "invalid line". This problem remains even when I add the module
    (in my case the 8139too) to /etc/modules to load at boot time.

    I'm quite sure I'm mixing up something obvious, but at this point I do
    not know what it is...

    So, anyone who successfully installed sarge on an oldworld PPC could
    possibly give me a pointer to the right way. Is 2.6.8 running smoothly
    from BootX? Why does 2.4.18 not work at all? How do I get the machine
    booting into the installed kernel (2.6.8) without hanging after the Tux
    or even before it? Is there a way to get the installer main menu up in
    the beginning (so that I don't have to wait for an error)?

    Thanks a lot in advance for any tip or pointer,
    Frank

  2. Re: need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX

    "Frank O. Fackelmayer" writes:

    [installing sarge on PMac 7300: frame buffer problems]

    I've had various problems with kernel 2.6.x and later 2.4.x on my
    PowerMac 7500. That's because the frame buffer interface has undergone a
    number of changes and many aspects special to Macintosh have not been
    adressed so far (e.g. Permedia 3, which I have on my Formac Proformance
    III, doesn't work at all, the driver has simply not been ported to the
    new kernel structures).

    That you can't boot with a 2.4.18 kernel seems unusual. But your problem
    report also suggests that something else is somehow wrong. Have you
    tried booting with the builtin framebuffer and without the MacPicasso
    card you mentioned earlier? Also why don't you try to boot the installed
    system from the 2.6.8 kernel you used for the installation procedure?

    Unfortunately I'm not really an expert on the debian installation
    procedure. Usually debian is only installed once on a system and runs
    happily ever after.

    I also wish to give the following general advice:

    1. In debian /etc/modules.conf should not be directly edited,
    create/edit files in /etc/modutils (for 2.2.x and 2.4.x) or
    /etc/modprobe.d (for 2.6) instead. Also, to use a modularized 2.6
    kernel, module-init-tools has to be installed.

    2. You can't boot the sarge installer with the woody 2.2.20 kernel
    because the corresponding modules are not in the installer image.
    Modules have to match the exact compilation of the kernel (have to be
    compiled with the same compiler from the same source tree with the
    same configuration).

    I'm on sid (which means that at one time I was also using the packages
    currently in sarge) and can boot my Pmac 7500 with a 2.6.8 kernel just
    fine. Actually the machines are similar enough, so I can easily send you
    my precompiled kernel package and it should just work. Unfortunately
    this won't help with the installer.

    But you could just as well do an install of woody as you already
    succeeded in that and upgrade to sarge. That would require the following
    lines in /etc/apt/preferences:

    ------------------------------------>8------------------------------
    Package: *
    Pin: release a=unstable
    Pin-Priority: 200

    Package: *
    Pin: release a=testing
    Pin-Priority: 900

    Package: *
    Pin: release a=stable,v=3.0*
    Pin-Priority: 201
    ------------------------------------>8------------------------------

    and the following change in /etc/apt/apt.conf:

    ------------------------------------>8------------------------------
    APT:efault-Release "testing";
    ------------------------------------>8------------------------------

    After adding these lines you would just use

    apt-cdrom add

    to make your sarge install CDs known to your woody installation or
    alternatively add the following to your /etc/apt/sources.list to
    download packages from the Internet (the deb-src lines can be
    omitted unless you wish to produce modified debian packages):

    ------------------------------------>8------------------------------
    deb http://ftp.de.debian.org/debian/ testing main non-free contrib
    deb-src http://ftp.de.debian.org/debian/ testing main non-free contrib
    deb http://ftp.de.debian.org/debian-non-US testing/non-US main contrib non-free
    deb-src http://ftp.de.debian.org/debian-non-US testing/non-US main contrib non-free
    ------------------------------------>8------------------------------

    Afterwards an apt-get --simulate dist-upgrade should tell you wether an
    upgrade will work.

    Once the current testing distribution (aka sarge) has been declared
    stable you would need to change the files mentioned above
    accordingly. Unless you wish to stay in testing of course.

    Thomas Jahns
    --
    "Computers are good at following instructions,
    but not at reading your mind."
    D. E. Knuth, The TeXbook, Addison-Wesley 1984, 1986, 1996, p. 9

  3. Re: need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX

    Thomas Jahns wrote:
    > "Frank O. Fackelmayer" writes:
    >
    > [installing sarge on PMac 7300: frame buffer problems]
    >
    > I've had various problems with kernel 2.6.x and later 2.4.x on my
    > PowerMac 7500. That's because the frame buffer interface has undergone a
    > number of changes and many aspects special to Macintosh have not been
    > adressed so far (e.g. Permedia 3, which I have on my Formac Proformance
    > III, doesn't work at all, the driver has simply not been ported to the
    > new kernel structures).
    >
    > That you can't boot with a 2.4.18 kernel seems unusual. But your problem
    > report also suggests that something else is somehow wrong. Have you
    > tried booting with the builtin framebuffer and without the MacPicasso
    > card you mentioned earlier? Also why don't you try to boot the installed
    > system from the 2.6.8 kernel you used for the installation procedure?
    >


    how can I do that? I think I do not really understand yet what is going on when
    I boot via BootX. This is what I think, but it might be completely wrong: BEFORE
    I install Debian, there is a ramdisk image that holds "something" (I guess the
    installer program) and the kernel, e.g. vmlinux. When I boot, I _think_ it boots
    this kernel and runs the "something" on the ramdisk. AFTER install, the kernel
    is still the same (in the "Linux kernels" folder), and there is a second kernel
    on the harddisk. Now, when I boot via BootX, which kernel is used? I feel it is
    the kernel in the "Linux kernels" folder instead of the "right" one on the
    harddisk; in fact I cannot simply remove it from the folder, because BootX
    complains then.
    So, HOW can I boot from the right kernel (the one that kept the installer
    running)?? Will I have to copy files from the Mac side onto the Linux partition?
    Or what else must be done here?


    > Unfortunately I'm not really an expert on the debian installation
    > procedure. Usually debian is only installed once on a system and runs
    > happily ever after.


    ok, I should have stayed with the original installation of Woody. This was
    installed after my tries with Yellowdog, and it installed very smoothly. Now,
    when I try to repeat this installation, the Woody "installer" behaves
    differently and I can't get it to work again. I usually fail in the disk
    partitioning nightmare; in my very first installation, it reconized the old
    partitions from Yellowdog and simply asked me whether to use them. Now, there is
    a text-based "partitioning tool" with no explanation at all what to do. This is
    really annoying :-o= especially because there is no decent documentation.


    Frank

  4. Re: need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX

    Frank O. Fackelmayer wrote:
    > Thomas Jahns wrote:
    >
    >> "Frank O. Fackelmayer" writes:
    >>
    >> [installing sarge on PMac 7300: frame buffer problems]
    >>
    >> I've had various problems with kernel 2.6.x and later 2.4.x on my
    >> PowerMac 7500. That's because the frame buffer interface has undergone a
    >> number of changes and many aspects special to Macintosh have not been
    >> adressed so far (e.g. Permedia 3, which I have on my Formac Proformance
    >> III, doesn't work at all, the driver has simply not been ported to the
    >> new kernel structures).
    >>
    >> That you can't boot with a 2.4.18 kernel seems unusual. But your problem
    >> report also suggests that something else is somehow wrong. Have you
    >> tried booting with the builtin framebuffer and without the MacPicasso
    >> card you mentioned earlier? Also why don't you try to boot the installed
    >> system from the 2.6.8 kernel you used for the installation procedure?
    >>

    >
    > how can I do that? I think I do not really understand yet what is going
    > on when I boot via BootX. This is what I think, but it might be
    > completely wrong: BEFORE I install Debian, there is a ramdisk image that
    > holds "something" (I guess the installer program) and the kernel, e.g.
    > vmlinux. When I boot, I _think_ it boots this kernel and runs the
    > "something" on the ramdisk. AFTER install, the kernel is still the same
    > (in the "Linux kernels" folder), and there is a second kernel on the
    > harddisk. Now, when I boot via BootX, which kernel is used? I feel it is
    > the kernel in the "Linux kernels" folder instead of the "right" one on
    > the harddisk; in fact I cannot simply remove it from the folder, because
    > BootX complains then.
    > So, HOW can I boot from the right kernel (the one that kept the
    > installer running)?? Will I have to copy files from the Mac side onto
    > the Linux partition? Or what else must be done here?
    >
    >
    >> Unfortunately I'm not really an expert on the debian installation
    >> procedure. Usually debian is only installed once on a system and runs
    >> happily ever after.

    >
    >
    > ok, I should have stayed with the original installation of Woody. This
    > was installed after my tries with Yellowdog, and it installed very
    > smoothly. Now, when I try to repeat this installation, the Woody
    > "installer" behaves differently and I can't get it to work again. I
    > usually fail in the disk partitioning nightmare; in my very first
    > installation, it reconized the old partitions from Yellowdog and simply
    > asked me whether to use them. Now, there is a text-based "partitioning
    > tool" with no explanation at all what to do. This is really annoying
    > :-o= especially because there is no decent documentation.
    >
    >
    > Frank

    Keep in mind that if you re-partition you will probably lose your
    install and data (if any). Debian wants the boot partition to be the
    first linux partition. I had trouble at first because I was designating
    the swap partition first. Also using bootx you are using Quik (sp?) and
    you should not be making a separate boot partition. The two commands in
    the partitioning/formatting tool that you really need to know are p and
    ?. Print the partition map and help. Use them often. I find it easiest
    to use values in blocks since that is default. You can start
    partitioning with the block immediatly following any Apple partitions
    present. There will be at least 5 or 6 depending on how you formatted
    under MacOS (if you did that). You have to designate the start block
    and length of each partiton and name it. That is where printing the map
    often helps. Some of the block values may need some calculating but
    nothing beyond 3rd grade arithmetic.


  5. Re: need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX

    "Frank O. Fackelmayer" writes:
    > Thomas Jahns wrote:
    > > "Frank O. Fackelmayer" writes:
    > > [installing sarge on PMac 7300: frame buffer problems]
    > > I've had various problems with kernel 2.6.x and later 2.4.x on my
    > > PowerMac 7500. That's because the frame buffer interface has undergone a
    > > number of changes and many aspects special to Macintosh have not been
    > > adressed so far (e.g. Permedia 3, which I have on my Formac Proformance
    > > III, doesn't work at all, the driver has simply not been ported to the
    > > new kernel structures).
    > > That you can't boot with a 2.4.18 kernel seems unusual. But your
    > > problem
    > > report also suggests that something else is somehow wrong. Have you
    > > tried booting with the builtin framebuffer and without the MacPicasso
    > > card you mentioned earlier? Also why don't you try to boot the installed
    > > system from the 2.6.8 kernel you used for the installation procedure?
    > >

    >
    > how can I do that? I think I do not really understand yet what is
    > going on when I boot via BootX. This is what I think, but it might be
    > completely wrong: BEFORE I install Debian, there is a ramdisk image
    > that holds "something" (I guess the installer program) and the kernel,
    > e.g. vmlinux. When I boot, I _think_ it boots this kernel and runs the
    > "something" on the ramdisk. AFTER install, the kernel is still the
    > same (in the "Linux kernels" folder), and there is a second kernel on
    > the harddisk. Now, when I boot via BootX, which kernel is used? I feel
    > it is the kernel in the "Linux kernels" folder instead of the "right"
    > one on the harddisk; in fact I cannot simply remove it from the
    > folder, because BootX complains then.


    initrd (initial ram disk) is just a file system image in a file, much
    like the files Disk Copy produces on MacOS.

    BootX offers to boot one from a number of kernel files you put into
    your MacOS partitions "Systemordner:Linux kernels" and you can also
    specify a ram disk (initial ram disk is different from ram disk only by
    the fact that an initial ram disk will later switch the root fs to
    another device). BootX knows nothing about the contents of the ram disk,
    just puts the contents at a location in ram and tells the kernel.

    > So, HOW can I boot from the right kernel (the one that kept the
    > installer running)?? Will I have to copy files from the Mac side onto
    > the Linux partition? Or what else must be done here?


    I just got this idea: did you perhaps choose the new kernel and still
    told BootX to load a ram disk? Try the other way round: take the kernel
    you used for installation and tell it to boot from your installation
    instead of the initrd (you need to pass an appropriate
    root=/dev/[hs]dx line to the kernel via BootX). But you should already
    know from your installation of woody how to do so.

    > > Unfortunately I'm not really an expert on the debian installation
    > > procedure. Usually debian is only installed once on a system and runs
    > > happily ever after.

    >
    > ok, I should have stayed with the original installation of Woody. This
    > was installed after my tries with Yellowdog, and it installed very
    > smoothly. Now, when I try to repeat this installation, the Woody
    > "installer" behaves differently and I can't get it to work again. I
    > usually fail in the disk partitioning nightmare; in my very first
    > installation, it reconized the old partitions from Yellowdog and
    > simply asked me whether to use them. Now, there is a text-based
    > "partitioning tool" with no explanation at all what to do. This is
    > really annoying :-o= especially because there is no decent
    > documentation.


    Yes, the macintosh fdisk is really user-unfriendly. But there is decent
    documentation in "Installing Debian GNU/Linux 3.0 For PowerPC" a file
    available as install.en.pdf from the debian site and there is supposed
    to be a file name mac-fdisk.txt on the installation media.

    But if your sarge installer does work to the point where you can
    create partitions you could just make the partitions with that and use
    them from the woody installer.

    Thomas Jahns
    --
    "Computers are good at following instructions,
    but not at reading your mind."
    D. E. Knuth, The TeXbook, Addison-Wesley 1984, 1986, 1996, p. 9

  6. Re: need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX

    Keith Krehbiel wrote:

    > Frank O. Fackelmayer wrote:
    >
    >> Thomas Jahns wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Frank O. Fackelmayer" writes:
    >>>
    >>> [installing sarge on PMac 7300: frame buffer problems]
    >>>
    >>> I've had various problems with kernel 2.6.x and later 2.4.x on my
    >>> PowerMac 7500. That's because the frame buffer interface has undergone a
    >>> number of changes and many aspects special to Macintosh have not been
    >>> adressed so far (e.g. Permedia 3, which I have on my Formac Proformance
    >>> III, doesn't work at all, the driver has simply not been ported to the
    >>> new kernel structures).
    >>>
    >>> That you can't boot with a 2.4.18 kernel seems unusual. But your problem
    >>> report also suggests that something else is somehow wrong. Have you
    >>> tried booting with the builtin framebuffer and without the MacPicasso
    >>> card you mentioned earlier? Also why don't you try to boot the installed
    >>> system from the 2.6.8 kernel you used for the installation procedure?
    >>>

    >>
    >> how can I do that? I think I do not really understand yet what is
    >> going on when I boot via BootX. This is what I think, but it might be
    >> completely wrong: BEFORE I install Debian, there is a ramdisk image
    >> that holds "something" (I guess the installer program) and the kernel,
    >> e.g. vmlinux. When I boot, I _think_ it boots this kernel and runs the
    >> "something" on the ramdisk. AFTER install, the kernel is still the
    >> same (in the "Linux kernels" folder), and there is a second kernel on
    >> the harddisk. Now, when I boot via BootX, which kernel is used? I feel
    >> it is the kernel in the "Linux kernels" folder instead of the "right"
    >> one on the harddisk; in fact I cannot simply remove it from the
    >> folder, because BootX complains then.
    >> So, HOW can I boot from the right kernel (the one that kept the
    >> installer running)?? Will I have to copy files from the Mac side onto
    >> the Linux partition? Or what else must be done here?
    >>
    >>
    >>> Unfortunately I'm not really an expert on the debian installation
    >>> procedure. Usually debian is only installed once on a system and runs
    >>> happily ever after.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> ok, I should have stayed with the original installation of Woody. This
    >> was installed after my tries with Yellowdog, and it installed very
    >> smoothly. Now, when I try to repeat this installation, the Woody
    >> "installer" behaves differently and I can't get it to work again. I
    >> usually fail in the disk partitioning nightmare; in my very first
    >> installation, it reconized the old partitions from Yellowdog and
    >> simply asked me whether to use them. Now, there is a text-based
    >> "partitioning tool" with no explanation at all what to do. This is
    >> really annoying :-o= especially because there is no decent documentation.
    >>
    >>
    >> Frank

    >
    > Keep in mind that if you re-partition you will probably lose your
    > install and data (if any).


    sure, but that is no problem at all. I am in fact experimenting with Linux on a
    machine that is not mission-critical :-)

    > Debian wants the boot partition to be the
    > first linux partition. I had trouble at first because I was designating
    > the swap partition first


    this is ok, my boot partition is on sdb2, swap on sdb3.

    .. Also using bootx you are using Quik (sp?) and
    > you should not be making a separate boot partition. The two commands in
    > the partitioning/formatting tool that you really need to know are p and
    > ?. Print the partition map and help. Use them often. I find it easiest
    > to use values in blocks since that is default. You can start
    > partitioning with the block immediatly following any Apple partitions
    > present. There will be at least 5 or 6 depending on how you formatted
    > under MacOS (if you did that). You have to designate the start block
    > and length of each partiton and name it. That is where printing the map
    > often helps. Some of the block values may need some calculating but
    > nothing beyond 3rd grade arithmetic.


    i got that now. However, after writing the partition map the installer does not
    recognize the swap partition.


  7. Re: need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX

    Frank O. Fackelmayer wrote:
    > Keith Krehbiel wrote:
    >
    >> Frank O. Fackelmayer wrote:
    >>
    >>> Thomas Jahns wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Frank O. Fackelmayer" writes:
    >>>>
    >>>> [installing sarge on PMac 7300: frame buffer problems]
    >>>>
    >>>> I've had various problems with kernel 2.6.x and later 2.4.x on my
    >>>> PowerMac 7500. That's because the frame buffer interface has undergone a
    >>>> number of changes and many aspects special to Macintosh have not been
    >>>> adressed so far (e.g. Permedia 3, which I have on my Formac Proformance
    >>>> III, doesn't work at all, the driver has simply not been ported to the
    >>>> new kernel structures).
    >>>>
    >>>> That you can't boot with a 2.4.18 kernel seems unusual. But your problem
    >>>> report also suggests that something else is somehow wrong. Have you
    >>>> tried booting with the builtin framebuffer and without the MacPicasso
    >>>> card you mentioned earlier? Also why don't you try to boot the installed
    >>>> system from the 2.6.8 kernel you used for the installation procedure?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> how can I do that? I think I do not really understand yet what is
    >>> going on when I boot via BootX. This is what I think, but it might be
    >>> completely wrong: BEFORE I install Debian, there is a ramdisk image
    >>> that holds "something" (I guess the installer program) and the
    >>> kernel, e.g. vmlinux. When I boot, I _think_ it boots this kernel and
    >>> runs the "something" on the ramdisk. AFTER install, the kernel is
    >>> still the same (in the "Linux kernels" folder), and there is a second
    >>> kernel on the harddisk. Now, when I boot via BootX, which kernel is
    >>> used? I feel it is the kernel in the "Linux kernels" folder instead
    >>> of the "right" one on the harddisk; in fact I cannot simply remove it
    >>> from the folder, because BootX complains then.
    >>> So, HOW can I boot from the right kernel (the one that kept the
    >>> installer running)?? Will I have to copy files from the Mac side onto
    >>> the Linux partition? Or what else must be done here?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Unfortunately I'm not really an expert on the debian installation
    >>>> procedure. Usually debian is only installed once on a system and runs
    >>>> happily ever after.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> ok, I should have stayed with the original installation of Woody.
    >>> This was installed after my tries with Yellowdog, and it installed
    >>> very smoothly. Now, when I try to repeat this installation, the Woody
    >>> "installer" behaves differently and I can't get it to work again. I
    >>> usually fail in the disk partitioning nightmare; in my very first
    >>> installation, it reconized the old partitions from Yellowdog and
    >>> simply asked me whether to use them. Now, there is a text-based
    >>> "partitioning tool" with no explanation at all what to do. This is
    >>> really annoying :-o= especially because there is no decent documentation.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Frank

    >>
    >>
    >> Keep in mind that if you re-partition you will probably lose your
    >> install and data (if any).

    >
    >
    > sure, but that is no problem at all. I am in fact experimenting with
    > Linux on a machine that is not mission-critical :-)
    >
    >> Debian wants the boot partition to be the first linux partition. I
    >> had trouble at first because I was designating the swap partition first

    >
    >
    > this is ok, my boot partition is on sdb2, swap on sdb3.
    >
    > . Also using bootx you are using Quik (sp?) and
    >
    >> you should not be making a separate boot partition. The two commands
    >> in the partitioning/formatting tool that you really need to know are p
    >> and ?. Print the partition map and help. Use them often. I find it
    >> easiest to use values in blocks since that is default. You can start
    >> partitioning with the block immediatly following any Apple partitions
    >> present. There will be at least 5 or 6 depending on how you formatted
    >> under MacOS (if you did that). You have to designate the start block
    >> and length of each partiton and name it. That is where printing the
    >> map often helps. Some of the block values may need some calculating
    >> but nothing beyond 3rd grade arithmetic.

    >
    >
    > i got that now. However, after writing the partition map the installer
    > does not recognize the swap partition.
    >


    Do you have the option of using a previously created/initialized swap
    partition?


  8. Re: need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX

    Keith Krehbiel writes:
    > Keep in mind that if you re-partition you will probably lose your
    > install and data (if any). Debian wants the boot partition to be the
    > first linux partition. I had trouble at first because I was


    That's possibly only relevant for quik, but Frank uses BootX.

    > designating the swap partition first. Also using bootx you are using
    > Quik (sp?) and you should not be making a separate boot partition.


    ? One either uses quik or BootX, not both.

    Thomas Jahns
    --
    "Computers are good at following instructions,
    but not at reading your mind."
    D. E. Knuth, The TeXbook, Addison-Wesley 1984, 1986, 1996, p. 9

  9. Re: need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX

    Keith Krehbiel wrote:
    > Frank O. Fackelmayer wrote:
    >
    >> i got that now. However, after writing the partition map the installer
    >> does not recognize the swap partition.
    >>

    >
    > Do you have the option of using a previously created/initialized swap
    > partition?
    >


    I did have this option the first time I installed Debian (there was YDL3
    on the disc before). Now, I am not offered this step during
    installation, but am thrown into the text-based partitioning thingy.

    Frank

  10. Re: need advice for Debian-sarge installation and BootX

    Frank O. Fackelmayer wrote:
    > Keith Krehbiel wrote:
    >
    >> Frank O. Fackelmayer wrote:
    >>
    >>> i got that now. However, after writing the partition map the
    >>> installer does not recognize the swap partition.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Do you have the option of using a previously created/initialized swap
    >> partition?
    >>

    >
    > I did have this option the first time I installed Debian (there was YDL3
    > on the disc before). Now, I am not offered this step during
    > installation, but am thrown into the text-based partitioning thingy.
    >
    > Frank


    I meant in the text-based partitioner.
    It was my understanding that Bootx used quik.
    Keith


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