Putting iMac DV+ to sleep - Powerpc

This is a discussion on Putting iMac DV+ to sleep - Powerpc ; I'm running Mandrake 9.1 PPC on an iMac DV+ G3 (acquired in 2000 - new world). Despite the absence of fans, it's quite a noisy box, mostly because of the hard drive, as far as I can tell. When running ...

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Thread: Putting iMac DV+ to sleep

  1. Putting iMac DV+ to sleep

    I'm running Mandrake 9.1 PPC on an iMac DV+ G3 (acquired in 2000 - new
    world). Despite the absence of fans, it's quite a noisy box, mostly because
    of the hard drive, as far as I can tell. When running MacOS 9 or X, I used
    to put it to sleep (suspend activity) when I was not using it, to cut the
    noise.

    I've looked around for answers on how to put it to sleep under Linux, but I
    can't find complete answers: I read some about suspend scripts, but they
    seem to talk about hibernation rather than sleep. Also, every time I read
    about power management, it's always about laptops.

    Anyone can either walk me through setting up power management for the sleep
    function, or point me in the right direction, or more generally clue me up
    on this? It's pretty much the last thing that I want to achieve to feel
    that I'm not loosing out on important functionality by having switched to
    Linux.

    Thanks in advance to anyone who can help.

    Vincent.

  2. Re: Putting iMac DV+ to sleep

    In article <3fa6f0e4$0$25165$79c14f64@nan-newsreader-01.noos.net>,
    Vincent Henderson wrote:
    > I'm running Mandrake 9.1 PPC on an iMac DV+ G3 (acquired in 2000 - new
    > world). Despite the absence of fans, it's quite a noisy box, mostly because
    > of the hard drive, as far as I can tell. When running MacOS 9 or X, I used
    > to put it to sleep (suspend activity) when I was not using it, to cut the
    > noise.
    >
    > I've looked around for answers on how to put it to sleep under Linux, but I
    > can't find complete answers: I read some about suspend scripts, but they
    > seem to talk about hibernation rather than sleep. Also, every time I read
    > about power management, it's always about laptops.
    >
    > Anyone can either walk me through setting up power management for the sleep
    > function, or point me in the right direction, or more generally clue me up
    > on this? It's pretty much the last thing that I want to achieve to feel
    > that I'm not loosing out on important functionality by having switched to
    > Linux.
    >
    > Thanks in advance to anyone who can help.
    >
    > Vincent.


    What you're looking for is a daemon called "pmud". With it, you'll be
    able to set the amount of time before the computer goes to sleep,
    manually place it into sleep mode, etc (assuming kernel support is
    available) I'm not sure if it is shipped with Mandrake or not. AFAIK
    freshmeat doesn't have a listing for it, so try a google search,
    you'll probably be able to find an RPM or the source available in
    pleanty of places (but make sure it's not shipped with Mandrake before
    attempting to install it again).

    Hope this helps...

    jb

  3. Re: Putting iMac DV+ to sleep

    josbat@bergen.org wrote:

    > In article <3fa6f0e4$0$25165$79c14f64@nan-newsreader-01.noos.net>,
    > Vincent Henderson wrote:
    >> I'm running Mandrake 9.1 PPC on an iMac DV+ G3 (acquired in 2000 - new
    >> world).

    (...)
    >> I've looked around for answers on how to put it to sleep under Linux, but
    >> I can't find complete answers: I read some about suspend scripts, but
    >> they seem to talk about hibernation rather than sleep. Also, every time I
    >> read about power management, it's always about laptops.

    (...)
    >
    > What you're looking for is a daemon called "pmud". With it, you'll be
    > able to set the amount of time before the computer goes to sleep,
    > manually place it into sleep mode, etc (assuming kernel support is
    > available) I'm not sure if it is shipped with Mandrake or not.


    OK. So it is shipped with Mandrake, but Mandrake have disabled it if it
    doesn't boot on a laptop, so as to avoid displaying a FAILED if it doesn't
    load. I'm sure whether this is such a sound decision, as I'm currently not
    advanced enough in Linux usage to change that state of affairs.
    So I snooped around, read the man pmud, and found out that /sbin/snooze was
    the thing that actually put it to sleep, while pmud just handled some
    battery management stuff and other power mgmt housekeeping.
    I thought I'd give snooze a try anyway. You need to force it to bypass pmud
    by using the -f argument (i.e. /sbin/snooze -f from a console). It works
    fine for me, although it's apparently not recommended to do that. But I've
    been snoozing it several times now, and it's a peach.
    So, on a standard iMac DV+ G3 300, it works fine for me, and I'll stick to
    that method until I know how to do it otherwise.
    I haven't tried with my firewire drive on and mounted, maybe it'll turn out
    I also need to hdparm it to sleep manually. I'll see.

    >
    > Hope this helps...
    >
    > jb


    Thanks for the pointing.

    Vincent.

  4. Re: Putting iMac DV+ to sleep

    In article <3fa83b1d$0$9225$79c14f64@nan-newsreader-03.noos.net>,
    Vincent Henderson wrote:
    > josbat@bergen.org wrote:
    >
    >> In article <3fa6f0e4$0$25165$79c14f64@nan-newsreader-01.noos.net>,
    >> Vincent Henderson wrote:
    >>> I'm running Mandrake 9.1 PPC on an iMac DV+ G3 (acquired in 2000 - new
    >>> world).

    > (...)
    >>> I've looked around for answers on how to put it to sleep under Linux, but
    >>> I can't find complete answers: I read some about suspend scripts, but
    >>> they seem to talk about hibernation rather than sleep. Also, every time I
    >>> read about power management, it's always about laptops.

    > (...)
    >>
    >> What you're looking for is a daemon called "pmud". With it, you'll be
    >> able to set the amount of time before the computer goes to sleep,
    >> manually place it into sleep mode, etc (assuming kernel support is
    >> available) I'm not sure if it is shipped with Mandrake or not.

    >
    > OK. So it is shipped with Mandrake, but Mandrake have disabled it if it
    > doesn't boot on a laptop, so as to avoid displaying a FAILED if it doesn't
    > load. I'm sure whether this is such a sound decision, as I'm currently not
    > advanced enough in Linux usage to change that state of affairs.
    > So I snooped around, read the man pmud, and found out that /sbin/snooze was
    > the thing that actually put it to sleep, while pmud just handled some
    > battery management stuff and other power mgmt housekeeping.
    > I thought I'd give snooze a try anyway. You need to force it to bypass pmud
    > by using the -f argument (i.e. /sbin/snooze -f from a console). It works
    > fine for me, although it's apparently not recommended to do that. But I've
    > been snoozing it several times now, and it's a peach.
    > So, on a standard iMac DV+ G3 300, it works fine for me, and I'll stick to
    > that method until I know how to do it otherwise.
    > I haven't tried with my firewire drive on and mounted, maybe it'll turn out
    > I also need to hdparm it to sleep manually. I'll see.
    >
    >>
    >> Hope this helps...
    >>
    >> jb

    >
    > Thanks for the pointing.
    >
    > Vincent.


    You should be able to re-enable it on startup by linking the script
    (which should be in /etc/init.d) into the folder for your appropriate runlevel.
    Name it something like SXXpmud in /etc/rcX.d (or the like for your distribution)
    (the XX for the link detonates when (in relation to other scripts) it
    should be run, while the X in the rcX.d folder detonates the runlevel at which
    the script should be run) and upon next boot it should load. Try it manually
    by running "/etc/init.d/pmud start" first to make sure it works; there may be a
    reason they disabled it. Keep in mind that Mandrake may have a script or
    application to do all this automagically, I'd take a quick look for something
    like that first before doing it manually, but either way should be perfect fine.

    Hope this helps...

    --
    #@
    jb

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