external disk for booting linux: which technology - Portable

This is a discussion on external disk for booting linux: which technology - Portable ; I want to boot linux to my IBM thinkpad from an external drive. Which technology will most likely achieve built-in disk performance: On the notebook side: - PCMCIA - USB - Firewire (via PCMCIA) - etc. (LP connector?) On the ...

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Thread: external disk for booting linux: which technology

  1. external disk for booting linux: which technology

    I want to boot linux to my IBM thinkpad from an external drive.

    Which technology will most likely achieve built-in disk performance:

    On the notebook side:
    - PCMCIA
    - USB
    - Firewire (via PCMCIA)
    - etc. (LP connector?)

    On the disk-interface side:
    - S-ATA
    - P-ATA
    - ???
    - SCSI (is dead, right? I actually have a (old) PCMCIA SCSI-adapter,
    but can't find any priceworthy disks)

    Thanks in advance, folks.

  2. Re: external disk for booting linux: which technology

    On Monday 11 December 2006 12:24,
    "unix_fan" wrote:

    > On the notebook side:
    > - PCMCIA
    > - USB
    > - Firewire (via PCMCIA)
    > - etc. (LP connector?)


    I've used several months the USB connection on my T43 without major
    problems. After that I felt experienced enough to install Linux on the
    Thinkpad itself (and removed Windows for once and for all ). Now I
    use the external disk mainly for backups, downloads, testing and as
    ready-to-install software source.

    >
    > On the disk-interface side:
    > - S-ATA
    > - P-ATA


    I use a Buffalo USB-powered external disk (40Gig). I believe it's a
    S-ATA with Samsung technology.

    Here you can find some more details:

    http://www.dealtime.co.uk/xPF-Buffal...NISTATION-40GB


    --
    Eddy
    * Ubuntu 6.10 [Debian GNU/Linux]
    * Kernel 2.6.17-10 / GNOME 2.16.1



  3. Re: external disk for booting linux: which technology




    unix_fan wrote:

    >- SCSI (is dead, right?


    SCA (Single Connector Attachment) SCSI is still wildly popular
    on servers. Check out the high end Dell servers, for example.
    80 pins to 68 pin adapters are widely available.

    Here are your choices:
    eSATA SATA 300 PATA 133 FireWire 800
    Speed (Mbit/s) 2400 2400 1064 786
    Cable length (m) 2 1 0.46 4.5
    External Power? Yes Yes Yes No

    FireWire 400 USB 2.0 SCA/U320 SCSI
    Speed (Mbit/s) 400 480 2560
    Cable length (m) 4.5 5 12
    External Power? No See Note Yes

    Note: USB hasc enough power to handle low-power laptop drives,
    but not the typical overheated desktop drive.

    Guy Macon




  4. Re: external disk for booting linux: which technology

    In comp.os.linux.misc unix_fan wrote:
    : - SCSI (is dead, right?

    Old parallel SCSI,probably, but serial scsi may have some life yet.
    One of the fundamental problems with SCSI has been the
    plethora of "standards" as the technology evolved. All
    pretty much incompatible of course.

    SATS and SAS are pretty clearly they way to go at this time.

    Stan
    --
    Stan Bischof ("stan" at the below domain)
    www.worldbadminton.com

  5. Re: external disk for booting linux: which technology

    On Mon, 11 Dec 2006 12:24:19 +0100, unix_fan wrote:

    > I want to boot linux to my IBM thinkpad from an external drive.
    >

    Great: usb2.0 does it brilliantly here with Ubuntu.

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