What recommended laptop(s) for power typing? - Portable

This is a discussion on What recommended laptop(s) for power typing? - Portable ; What make/model of laptop would you recommend for typing? I have used a Dell Inspiron 7500 for the last five years and the keyboard is the only thing I'm not too happy about. I find it a bit soft and ...

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  1. What recommended laptop(s) for power typing?

    What make/model of laptop would you recommend for typing?

    I have used a Dell Inspiron 7500 for the last five years and the
    keyboard is the only thing I'm not too happy about. I find it a bit soft
    and over-responsive. Naturally I can't tell what it was like when I
    first bought it. But since everything else is still performing quite
    nicely I suspect that the keyboard was the machine's weak spot.

    As I am planning to replace the Dell with a similar machine - large
    display with one of the higher 4:3 resolutions - I would greatly
    appreciate some feeedback from touch typists who have recently had
    positive experiences involving lengthy typing sessions.

    Thank you.
    cga


  2. Re: What recommended laptop(s) for power typing?

    cga writes:
    > As I am planning to replace the Dell with a similar machine - large
    > display with one of the higher 4:3 resolutions - I would greatly
    > appreciate some feeedback from touch typists who have recently had
    > positive experiences involving lengthy typing sessions.


    Laptop keyboards just get worse and worse. None today are anywhere
    near as good as the IBM and Toshiba keyboards of the late 80's-early
    90's. Use an external keyboard if you can. If not, think about
    whether you really need modern CPU-hungry software. Maybe you can
    use an old laptop with a good keyboard.

  3. Re: What recommended laptop(s) for power typing?

    Paul Rubin wrote:
    > cga writes:
    >
    >>As I am planning to replace the Dell with a similar machine - large
    >>display with one of the higher 4:3 resolutions - I would greatly
    >>appreciate some feeedback from touch typists who have recently had
    >>positive experiences involving lengthy typing sessions.

    >
    >
    > Laptop keyboards just get worse and worse. None today are anywhere
    > near as good as the IBM and Toshiba keyboards of the late 80's-early
    > 90's. Use an external keyboard if you can. If not, think about
    > whether you really need modern CPU-hungry software. Maybe you can
    > use an old laptop with a good keyboard.


    Not very encouraging. :-)

    I vaguely thought Thinkpad's still had decent keyboards.

    How far back in time would you recommend going to find a laptop with a
    really good keyboard? And what make/model(s) should I be looking for?

    Thanks.


  4. Re: What recommended laptop(s) for power typing?

    In article <34tu3gF4e0t78U1@individual.net>, cga wrote:
    >Paul Rubin wrote:
    >> cga writes:
    >>
    >>>As I am planning to replace the Dell with a similar machine - large
    >>>display with one of the higher 4:3 resolutions - I would greatly
    >>>appreciate some feeedback from touch typists who have recently had
    >>>positive experiences involving lengthy typing sessions.

    >>
    >>
    >> Laptop keyboards just get worse and worse. None today are anywhere
    >> near as good as the IBM and Toshiba keyboards of the late 80's-early
    >> 90's. Use an external keyboard if you can. If not, think about
    >> whether you really need modern CPU-hungry software. Maybe you can
    >> use an old laptop with a good keyboard.

    >
    >Not very encouraging. :-)
    >
    >I vaguely thought Thinkpad's still had decent keyboards.
    >
    >How far back in time would you recommend going to find a laptop with a
    >really good keyboard? And what make/model(s) should I be looking for?
    >
    >Thanks.


    Thinkpad keyboards are also getting cheaper over the years, but are
    still better than their competitors. Typically, the business targetted
    models have better keyboards and cost more.

    I have had good luck running Linux with text based editors (vi/emacs)
    over Windows/Word. They take less CPU cycles / keystroke, which allows
    snappy performance on older Notebooks (and also better battery consumption).
    If Word compatibility is required, I convert it to Word or OpenOffice
    when I'm done with the content ready to send it on.

    I recently bought a refurbished (off-lease) Thinkpad X21. It's keyboard
    is still pretty nice. This is a single spindel computer (<4lbs), thus a
    bit skinnier than standard. I'm also entertaining getting a used Thinkapd
    T22 (standard size, dual spindle) for my wife when she gets into grad.
    school. They both run Linux very well, and it's always a pleasure to
    type on them even after using a desktop machine with regular keyboard.

    Later, -ingo
    --
    /* Ingo Cyliax, cyliax@ezcomm.com, Tel: 812-391-0895 */


  5. Re: What recommended laptop(s) for power typing?

    cga writes:
    > I vaguely thought Thinkpad's still had decent keyboards.


    By today's standards, Thinkpads are ok, though current ones have
    stiffer action than old ones. I like the old ones better.

    > How far back in time would you recommend going to find a laptop with a
    > really good keyboard? And what make/model(s) should I be looking for?


    Gee, I dunno. I think my Thinkpad 770's keyboard was better than
    anything being made today. The 755cx was better than the 770. And my
    1980's-vintage Toshibas were better than the 755cx.

    I think in the 1980's, notebook computers were pretty new and their
    keyboards' evolution hadn't yet diverged so far from desktop
    keyboards. The downside is that those 1980's notebook keyboards, with
    their full-travel keys, took a lot more space than today's notebook
    keyboards. They made the notebook bigger. That might be a hard sell
    in today's market, for small and midsized notebooks. But I can't
    understand why large desktop-replacement notebooks don't have
    desktop-like keyboards, since the extra space needed is less of an
    issue.

  6. Re: What recommended laptop(s) for power typing?

    cga writes:

    >Paul Rubin wrote:
    >> cga writes:
    >>
    >>>As I am planning to replace the Dell with a similar machine - large
    >>>display with one of the higher 4:3 resolutions - I would greatly
    >>>appreciate some feeedback from touch typists who have recently had
    >>>positive experiences involving lengthy typing sessions.

    >>
    >>
    >> Laptop keyboards just get worse and worse. None today are anywhere
    >> near as good as the IBM and Toshiba keyboards of the late 80's-early
    >> 90's. Use an external keyboard if you can. If not, think about
    >> whether you really need modern CPU-hungry software. Maybe you can
    >> use an old laptop with a good keyboard.


    >Not very encouraging. :-)

    oI would strongly advise you to go into shops to try them out. What one
    person thinks of as mushy, the other thinks of as sensitive. It is you
    typing and you should be making the decision.
    I use a toughbook (panasonic) and quite like the touch-- but others might
    well find it too sensitive and the keyboard too small.


  7. Re: What recommended laptop(s) for power typing?

    Bill Unruh wrote:

    [..]

    >>Not very encouraging. :-)

    >
    > oI would strongly advise you to go into shops to try them out. What one
    > person thinks of as mushy, the other thinks of as sensitive. It is you
    > typing and you should be making the decision.
    > I use a toughbook (panasonic) and quite like the touch-- but others might
    > well find it too sensitive and the keyboard too small.
    >


    Gentleman.. Thanks for your replies.

    Bill's obviously right.. For current models it's certainly a good idea
    to try them on for size before buying. Not that it's easy.. most places
    I have been, they have the laptops chained to a shelf at the average
    person's eye level.. not sure if actually touching them causes an alarm
    to go off or what.. In any event, the better makes/models don't seem to
    make it to the stores.. at least in my area.

    Good point also that it doesn't make much sense to tout some portables
    as desktop replacements w/o providing a keyboard to match. I tried to
    read some benchmarks and reviews but s/o will come up with a - e.g.
    "excellent keyboard".. and no explanation whatsoever as to what's so
    wonderful about it. In many cases it makes you doubt they really know
    what they're talking about..

    I've tried the external keyboard solution and even with a cordless I
    found it got in the way.. and besides I like the idea of a laptop being
    the compleat compact solution to my computing needs. What would be nice
    would be the possibility of actually replacing the flimsy keyboards you
    find on notebooks with something more like real keyboard. Or start my
    own laptop business while I'm at it... :-)








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