Intel 2200BG Wireless Driver - Portable

This is a discussion on Intel 2200BG Wireless Driver - Portable ; Hey ! Which driver do you use for your Intel 2200BG Wireless card. I heard about 2 or 3 drivers. (IPW2200, NDIS, and another one...) Is it possible to use it in Monitor mode ? (for wardriving softwares) Thanks a ...

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Thread: Intel 2200BG Wireless Driver

  1. Intel 2200BG Wireless Driver

    Hey !

    Which driver do you use for your Intel 2200BG Wireless card.
    I heard about 2 or 3 drivers. (IPW2200, NDIS, and another one...)

    Is it possible to use it in Monitor mode ? (for wardriving softwares)

    Thanks a lot.

    --
    Thomas V.



  2. Re: Intel 2200BG Wireless Driver

    "Thomas V." writes:

    >Hey !


    >Which driver do you use for your Intel 2200BG Wireless card.
    >I heard about 2 or 3 drivers. (IPW2200, NDIS, and another one...)


    ipw2200 is native driver. Ndiswrapper and linuxant driverloader are
    programs which use the Windows drivers under Linux.


    >Is it possible to use it in Monitor mode ? (for wardriving softwares)


    What is monitor mode?



  3. Re: Intel 2200BG Wireless Driver

    Bill Unruh wrote:
    > "Thomas V." writes:
    >
    >
    >>Hey !

    >
    >
    >>Which driver do you use for your Intel 2200BG Wireless card.
    >>I heard about 2 or 3 drivers. (IPW2200, NDIS, and another one...)

    >
    >
    > ipw2200 is native driver. Ndiswrapper and linuxant driverloader are
    > programs which use the Windows drivers under Linux.
    >
    >
    >
    >>Is it possible to use it in Monitor mode ? (for wardriving softwares)

    >
    >
    > What is monitor mode?


    There are 3 ways a wireless card can run. (Not counting ad-hoc, but
    that's irrelevant.) The "normal" way is for it to talk to an access
    point and pass only packets destined for it to the OS. "Promiscuous"
    mode (often confused with monitor, but not the same thing) comes from
    Ethernet and will pass all packets on the network to the OS. "Monitor",
    or "rfmon" mode will pass all raw 802.11g packets to the OS, allowing it
    to see traffic from any network, encrypted or not (obviously it can't
    decrypt encrypted traffic, but it will pass it on nonetheless). The
    reason for the distinction is that on 802.11, the traffic on one network
    (promiscuous) is not the same as all traffic received (rfmon), while on
    Ethernet you only receive traffic on one network, so they are the same
    thing.

    And, no, ipw2200 doesn't have rfmon. (Yet.)

    --Thomas Tuttle

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