antivirus and anti spam - Portable

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  1. antivirus and anti spam

    Most of the software seems to be for servers . Any recommendation on
    antispam and antivirus for the laptop ?


  2. Re: antivirus and anti spam

    On 13 Jan 2004 02:26:05 GMT, Drew Cutter staggered into the Black Sun
    and said:
    > Most of the software seems to be for servers . Any recommendation on
    > antispam and antivirus for the laptop ?


    Antispam: Spamassassin and procmail get good press. I've had good luck
    filtering out spam with KMail's built-in filters, but YMMV. It'd help
    if you described which version of which distro you're using, and maybe
    which e-mail client you use.

    Antivirus: No Linux viruses have been seen in the wild yet. The
    average Unix e-mail client is terribly paranoid about anything
    associated with an e-mail and won't *ever* execute an attachment. Most
    of them ask "are you sure?" before letting you open an attached
    document.

    This doesn't mean you can just sit back and relax; security holes get
    found in many packages from time to time, so do "emerge sync && emerge
    world" or your distro's equivalent every so often.

    --
    Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to see
    Brainbench MVP for Linux Admin / mail: TRAP + SPAN don't belong
    http://www.brainbench.com / Hire me!
    -----------------------------/ http://crow202.dyndns.org/~mhgraham/resume

  3. Re: antivirus and anti spam

    Planning on using suse . I thought kmail had it , thanks. I'm sure you
    know linux has become the newest target for virus.


  4. Re: antivirus and anti spam

    On 13 Jan 2004 11:59:23 GMT, Drew Cutter staggered into the Black Sun
    and said:

    When following up to a message on Usenet, include context so that people
    know what you're talking about. Context restored:

    > Dances With Crows wrote:
    >> Drew Cutter wrote:
    >>> Most of the software seems to be for servers . Any recommendation on
    >>> antispam and antivirus for the laptop ?

    >>Antispam: Spamassassin and procmail get good press. I've had good
    >>luck filtering out spam with KMail's built-in filters, but YMMV.


    >>Antivirus: No Linux viruses have been seen in the wild yet. The
    >>average Unix e-mail client is terribly paranoid about anything
    >>associated with an e-mail and won't *ever* execute an attachment.


    > Planning on using suse . I thought kmail had it


    KMail has filtering capability built-in, so you can get rid of most
    spam. The filters are not "smart" though.

    > linux has become the newest target for virus.


    Where did you hear that, and what evidence did they provide to support
    that position? It's possible, just not likely, since so many Linux
    users are informed about security, and Microsoft LookOut still has a
    huge share of the e-mail client base.

    --
    Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to see
    Brainbench MVP for Linux Admin / mail: TRAP + SPAN don't belong
    http://www.brainbench.com / Hire me!
    -----------------------------/ http://crow202.dyndns.org/~mhgraham/resume

  5. Re: antivirus and anti spam

    I've seen articles comparing MS attacks to Linux attacks. The security
    patches to linux are easier to fix and less severe . I agree that most
    linux user are security aware. I don't think its virus attack as it is
    DOS attacks ,etc.
    However , I not sure of college user are that aware . Example of this
    was at our installfest this past weekend. The non-linux geeks out number
    the linux geeks for the first time. The university where we have our
    installfest is requiring their students to use linux. I knew more about
    security than my college professor i had two years ago. go figure .


  6. Re: antivirus and anti spam

    On 13 Jan 2004 17:37:53 GMT, Drew Cutter staggered into the Black Sun
    and said:

    This is the second time in a row you've forgotten to include context
    from previous posts in the thread when you're following up. Don't do
    that--it makes it really difficult to follow a thread, and tough for
    other people to jump in if they want.

    > Dances With Crows wrote:
    >>On 13 Jan 2004 11:59:23 GMT, Drew Cutter staggered into the Black Sun
    >>and said:
    >>> Dances With Crows wrote:
    >>>> Drew Cutter wrote:
    >>>>> Most of the software seems to be for servers . Any recommendation
    >>>>> on antispam and antivirus for the laptop ?
    >>>>Antispam: Spamassassin and procmail get good press.
    >>>>Antivirus: No Linux viruses have been seen in the wild yet.

    [snip]
    >>> linux has become the newest target for virus.

    >>Where did you hear that, and what evidence did they provide to support
    >>that position? It's possible, just not likely, since so many Linux
    >>users are informed about security, and Microsoft LookOut still has a
    >>huge share of the e-mail client base.

    > I've seen articles comparing MS attacks to Linux attacks. The security
    > patches to linux are easier to fix and less severe . I agree that most
    > linux user are security aware. I don't think its virus attack as it is
    > DOS attacks ,etc.


    A DOS attack is not a virus; it'd be silly to expect antivirus programs
    to protect you against a DOS or DDOS. If you have machines that are
    hooked to the Net 24/7, you need to take some precautions, though:

    0. Don't run unnecessary network services. (Do you really need to run
    sendmail/postfix? Probably not.)
    1. Keep your distro up to date by running "emerge sync && emerge world"
    or your distro's equivalent (YaST Online Update, apt-get dist-update...)
    every week.
    2. Use ipchains/iptables to set some roadblocks in the 31337 h4x0r5'
    way.
    3. Don't use telnet or rsh. Use ssh instead--it's actually more
    convenient than telnet once you've set your public keys up properly.
    4. Subscribe to the "$DISTRO-announce" or "$DISTRO-security" mailing
    list for your distro, so you'll get quick updates about potential
    problems.

    > However , I not sure of college user are that aware.


    I sure that college user are out consuming beer and scoping chicks
    rather than worrying about network security. At least, the *smart* ones
    are!

    > Example of this was at our installfest this past weekend. The
    > non-linux geeks out number the linux geeks for the first time. The
    > university where we have our installfest is requiring their students
    > to use linux. I knew more about security than my college professor i
    > had two years ago.


    This is a good sign, all things considered. Don't worry about your CS
    professor; his job is to know about high-level implications of
    networking security as applied to arbitrary systems of varying
    complexity. Concentrating on actual working systems is
    counterproductive and considered gauche. After all, the Linux folks
    have dealt with ipfwadm (2.0 series), ipchains (2.2 series), and
    iptables (2.4 and 2.6 now) in the last 5 years. The tools and the way
    you actually use them have changed a lot; the concepts stay the same.
    (This attitude taken to the extreme is why you find CS professors who
    say their operating system is Internet Explorer....)

    --
    Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to see
    Brainbench MVP for Linux Admin / mail: TRAP + SPAN don't belong
    http://www.brainbench.com / Hire me!
    -----------------------------/ http://crow202.dyndns.org/~mhgraham/resume

  7. Re: antivirus and anti spam



    Dances With Crows wrote:
    > On 13 Jan 2004 17:37:53 GMT, Drew Cutter staggered into the Black Sun
    > and said:
    >
    > This is the second time in a row you've forgotten to include context
    > from previous posts in the thread when you're following up. Don't do
    > that--it makes it really difficult to follow a thread, and tough for
    > other people to jump in if they want.
    >
    >
    >>Dances With Crows wrote:
    >>
    >>>On 13 Jan 2004 11:59:23 GMT, Drew Cutter staggered into the Black Sun
    >>>and said:
    >>>
    >>>>Dances With Crows wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Drew Cutter wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Most of the software seems to be for servers . Any recommendation
    >>>>>>on antispam and antivirus for the laptop ?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Antispam: Spamassassin and procmail get good press.
    >>>>>Antivirus: No Linux viruses have been seen in the wild yet.

    >
    > [snip]
    >
    >>>>linux has become the newest target for virus.
    >>>
    >>>Where did you hear that, and what evidence did they provide to support
    >>>that position? It's possible, just not likely, since so many Linux
    >>>users are informed about security, and Microsoft LookOut still has a
    >>>huge share of the e-mail client base.

    >>
    >>I've seen articles comparing MS attacks to Linux attacks. The security
    >>patches to linux are easier to fix and less severe . I agree that most
    >>linux user are security aware. I don't think its virus attack as it is
    >>DOS attacks ,etc.

    >
    >
    > A DOS attack is not a virus; it'd be silly to expect antivirus programs
    > to protect you against a DOS or DDOS. If you have machines that are
    > hooked to the Net 24/7, you need to take some precautions, though:

    I agree that antivirus won't get the job done. I do have a firewall now.
    I plan to get snort running later this year. Plan to use mysql for logs
    , antivirus for mail server , snort.


    >
    > 0. Don't run unnecessary network services. (Do you really need to run
    > sendmail/postfix? Probably not.)
    > 1. Keep your distro up to date by running "emerge sync && emerge world"
    > or your distro's equivalent (YaST Online Update, apt-get dist-update...)
    > every week.


    Love this suggestions. Do you have Yast link ? I Run apt-get on red hat
    now. Is yast apart of suse ?

    > 2. Use ipchains/iptables to set some roadblocks in the 31337 h4x0r5'
    > way.
    > 3. Don't use telnet or rsh. Use ssh instead--it's actually more
    > convenient than telnet once you've set your public keys up properly.
    > 4. Subscribe to the "$DISTRO-announce" or "$DISTRO-security" mailing
    > list for your distro, so you'll get quick updates about potential
    > problems.

    I do subscribe to a more general list . pertains to all linux . Wonder
    how suse will change once novell make their changes in the near future.
    I will look into suse mailing list.

    >
    >
    >>However , I not sure of college user are that aware.

    >
    >
    > I sure that college user are out consuming beer and scoping chicks
    > rather than worrying about network security. At least, the *smart* ones
    > are!


    Granted . But I'm sure my friends who are in charge of incident response
    at two universities wish they would run anti virus (update weekly) and
    run something else beside kazaa. Would mind if the university required
    personal firewall for all students. Love to hear my friends stories.
    Especially since they can't lock down the network as much as they want
    to . Keeps you on your feet . Love fall semester - bottles of aspirin.
    >
    >
    >>Example of this was at our installfest this past weekend. The
    >>non-linux geeks out number the linux geeks for the first time. The
    >>university where we have our installfest is requiring their students
    >>to use linux. I knew more about security than my college professor i
    >>had two years ago.

    >
    >
    > This is a good sign, all things considered. Don't worry about your CS
    > professor; his job is to know about high-level implications of
    > networking security as applied to arbitrary systems of varying
    > complexity. Concentrating on actual working systems is
    > counterproductive and considered gauche. After all, the Linux folks
    > have dealt with ipfwadm (2.0 series), ipchains (2.2 series), and
    > iptables (2.4 and 2.6 now) in the last 5 years. The tools and the way
    > you actually use them have changed a lot; the concepts stay the same.
    > (This attitude taken to the extreme is why you find CS professors who
    > say their operating system is Internet Explorer....)
    >


    I saw him at a infraguard trade show. Because of me , he made changes
    to the class (updated). We both felt that their should of been one more
    class in security - hands on experience .

    What suggestion would you suggest on protecting wireless connections ?
    Don't want someone hacking my laptop via wireless connection. Firewall ?


  8. Re: antivirus and anti spam

    I meant red carpet not apt-get.


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