Access a USB drive from Linux and Windows - Portable

This is a discussion on Access a USB drive from Linux and Windows - Portable ; Hi, I want to be able to attach a USB drive to Red Hat Linux 8.3 and write files to it and then be able to take the USB drive to a Windows machine and read the files. I have ...

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Thread: Access a USB drive from Linux and Windows

  1. Access a USB drive from Linux and Windows

    Hi,
    I want to be able to attach a USB drive to Red Hat Linux 8.3 and
    write files to it and then be able to take the USB drive to a Windows
    machine and read the files. I have a USB drive and I've been trying
    to achieve this goal without success. The drive works because I have
    been able to access it from Windows by totally reformatting it. I
    tried formatting a 31 MB partition on partition 1 using Windows and
    then taking it to Linux. Linux wouldn't let me mount the volume.
    Windows wouldn't let me partition the entire drive as a FAT partition.
    I tried using Linux fdisk and mkfs -t msdos /dev/sda1. That resulted
    in error "Attempting to create a too large file system". Any ideas?

    R. Hixon

  2. Re: Access a USB drive from Linux and Windows

    On 12 Nov 2003 19:59:46 -0800, R. Hixon staggered into the Black Sun and
    said:
    > I want to be able to attach a USB drive to Red Hat Linux 8.3


    Gonna be tough, since Redhat 8.3 doesn't exist.

    > write files to it and then be able to take the USB drive to a Windows
    > machine and read the files.


    Shouldn't be a problem; USB Mass Storage devices that follow specs are
    well-supported and so are FAT32 filesystems.

    > I have a USB drive and I've been trying to achieve this goal without
    > success. The drive works because I have been able to access it from
    > Windows


    So what happens when you try to mount it under Linux?

    > tried formatting a 31 MB partition on partition 1 using Windows and
    > then taking it to Linux. Linux wouldn't let me mount the volume.


    What was the output from dmesg when you tried?

    > Windows wouldn't let me partition the entire drive as a FAT partition.


    If the space is smaller than 2G, it should be FAT16 (type 0x06), larger
    than 2G but smaller than 8G, it should be FAT32 (type 0x0b), if it's
    larger than 8G, it should be FAT32-LBA (type 0x0c). If you get the
    types wrong, 'Doze can get annoyed and randomly scribble on your data.

    > I tried using Linux fdisk and mkfs -t msdos /dev/sda1. That resulted
    > in error "Attempting to create a too large file system". Any ideas?


    mkdosfs -F32 /dev/NNN on partitions larger than 2G, since mkdosfs uses
    FAT16 by default. HTH,

    --
    Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to see
    Brainbench MVP for Linux Admin / mail: TRAP + SPAN don't belong
    http://www.brainbench.com / "He is a rhythmic movement of the
    -----------------------------/ penguins, is Tux." --MegaHAL

  3. Re: Access a USB drive from Linux and Windows

    Dances With Crows wrote in message news:...
    > On 12 Nov 2003 19:59:46 -0800, R. Hixon staggered into the Black Sun and
    > said:
    > > I want to be able to attach a USB drive to Red Hat Linux 8.3

    >
    > Gonna be tough, since Redhat 8.3 doesn't exist.
    >
    > > write files to it and then be able to take the USB drive to a Windows
    > > machine and read the files.

    >
    > Shouldn't be a problem; USB Mass Storage devices that follow specs are
    > well-supported and so are FAT32 filesystems.
    >
    > > I have a USB drive and I've been trying to achieve this goal without
    > > success. The drive works because I have been able to access it from
    > > Windows

    >
    > So what happens when you try to mount it under Linux?
    >
    > > tried formatting a 31 MB partition on partition 1 using Windows and
    > > then taking it to Linux. Linux wouldn't let me mount the volume.

    >
    > What was the output from dmesg when you tried?
    >
    > > Windows wouldn't let me partition the entire drive as a FAT partition.

    >
    > If the space is smaller than 2G, it should be FAT16 (type 0x06), larger
    > than 2G but smaller than 8G, it should be FAT32 (type 0x0b), if it's
    > larger than 8G, it should be FAT32-LBA (type 0x0c). If you get the
    > types wrong, 'Doze can get annoyed and randomly scribble on your data.
    >
    > > I tried using Linux fdisk and mkfs -t msdos /dev/sda1. That resulted
    > > in error "Attempting to create a too large file system". Any ideas?

    >
    > mkdosfs -F32 /dev/NNN on partitions larger than 2G, since mkdosfs uses
    > FAT16 by default. HTH,


    Thank you. I ran fdisk on the USB drive and changed the type to 0C.
    Then, I used the mkdosfs command and I'm able to use the USB drive on
    both machines.

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