The lone Linux user - Portable

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  1. The lone Linux user

    With the help of people in this group I have been able to get Linux
    installed on my HPze5170. Many thanks. I have a question. I work for a
    small company and I am the only one in the company with Linux. Everyone
    else has Windows. Often people will ask me for help with thier systems. I
    said that I have a question and here it is; Has it been the experience of
    this group that using Linux helps you to understand what Windows is doing,
    or is it the other way around?

    On the one hand the difference between Linux and Windows seems to be similar
    to the difference between a manual and automatic transmission on a car. The
    automatic is less efficent but it does the shifting for you. The manual
    transmission is more efficient, but you have to know what you are doing.
    Both transmissions shift gears.

    On the other hand I found myself typing in ls at the Windows command prompt
    the other day. This is not a big problem right now, but our company is
    growing. We don't have an IT department right now, but we can forsee
    needing one. If we do get an IT department I can almost garentee that I
    will be the only member for some time. I don't see being able to get the
    entire company switched to Linux because I think that most of my co-workers
    would be unable to use it.



  2. Re: The lone Linux user

    Michael wrote:

    > Has it been the experience of
    > this group that using Linux helps you to understand what Windows is doing,
    > or is it the other way around?


    Linux will certainly give you an appreciation of how crappy Windows is.

    --

    Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

    To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
    james.knott.

  3. Re: The lone Linux user

    On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 11:49:13 -0500, Michael typed:

    > With the help of people in this group I have been able to get Linux
    > installed on my HPze5170. Many thanks. I have a question. I work for
    > a small company and I am the only one in the company with Linux.
    > Everyone else has Windows. Often people will ask me for help with thier
    > systems. I said that I have a question and here it is; Has it been the
    > experience of this group that using Linux helps you to understand what
    > Windows is doing, or is it the other way around?


    Yes, both ways. Linux helps and builds your understanding of what going on
    both hardware and software wise. Windows does the same thing in a
    different way. You now have the benefit of understanding from working with
    both operating systems providing added knowledge in trouble resolution.


    --
    SCO + RICO Act = Justice

    Hi! I'm a .sig virus! Copy me to your .sig!


  4. Re: The lone Linux user

    Michael wrote:

    > With the help of people in this group I have been able to get Linux
    > installed on my HPze5170. Many thanks. I have a question. I work for a
    > small company and I am the only one in the company with Linux. Everyone
    > else has Windows. Often people will ask me for help with thier systems.
    > I said that I have a question and here it is; Has it been the experience
    > of this group that using Linux helps you to understand what Windows is
    > doing, or is it the other way around?


    I used Windows for 10 years, and I /still/ don't know what the hell it's
    doing.


    >
    > On the one hand the difference between Linux and Windows seems to be
    > similar
    > to the difference between a manual and automatic transmission on a car.
    > The
    > automatic is less efficent but it does the shifting for you. The manual
    > transmission is more efficient, but you have to know what you are doing.
    > Both transmissions shift gears.


    Also - The automatic is more expensive and breaks more often

    >
    > On the other hand I found myself typing in ls at the Windows command
    > prompt
    > the other day. This is not a big problem right now, but our company is
    > growing. We don't have an IT department right now, but we can forsee
    > needing one. If we do get an IT department I can almost garentee that I
    > will be the only member for some time. I don't see being able to get the
    > entire company switched to Linux because I think that most of my
    > co-workers would be unable to use it.




    --
    "They say there are strangers, who threaten us
    in our immigrants and infidels
    They say there is strangeness, too dangerous
    in our theatres and bookstore shelves
    That those who know what's best for us
    must rise and save us from ourselves"
    --Rush, 'Witch Hunt'


  5. Re: The lone Linux user

    "Lenard" wrote in message
    newsan.2003.10.28.23.34.06.68701@127.0.0.1...
    > On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 11:49:13 -0500, Michael typed:
    >
    > > With the help of people in this group I have been able to get Linux
    > > installed on my HPze5170. Many thanks. I have a question. I work for
    > > a small company and I am the only one in the company with Linux.
    > > Everyone else has Windows. Often people will ask me for help with thier
    > > systems. I said that I have a question and here it is; Has it been the
    > > experience of this group that using Linux helps you to understand what
    > > Windows is doing, or is it the other way around?

    >
    > Yes, both ways. Linux helps and builds your understanding of what going on
    > both hardware and software wise. Windows does the same thing in a
    > different way. You now have the benefit of understanding from working with
    > both operating systems providing added knowledge in trouble resolution.
    >
    >


    Agreed.

    Also, if you want the *nix utilities on your Wintel box, install the Cygwin
    tools. That will get you ls, ps, and actual shells. That way if you are
    stuck in windows but just gotta run a shell with cryptic commands to fell
    good about life, you can.



  6. Re: The lone Linux user

    "Michael" writes:

    > I work for a small company and I am the only one in the company with
    > Linux. Everyone else has Windows. Often people will ask me for help
    > with thier systems.


    It's been my experience that knowledge of one operating system
    does not carry over well into another. My experiences with Windows have
    been mixed-- on the one hand, I did manage to feed my family for a year
    or so writing software on contract for Windows; on the other hand, it
    was an unending barrange of frustration while dealing with configuration
    files and other managerial tasks that were obscure, not-human-readable,
    and generally not clear.

    My general excuse is "I'm sorry, I don't do Windows." If people
    ask why not, I have a long list of virus attacks, performance
    greivances, and security nightmares to relay. A friend of mine went
    ape**** thinking his machine had been hacked recently when new logins
    showed up in his administrative user's dialog; no, Windows had just
    added "new features" with the latest "patch" and hadn't told anyone the
    visible effects of their changes.

    Elf

  7. Re: The lone Linux user

    Michael wrote:

    > With the help of people in this group I have been able to get Linux
    > installed on my HPze5170. Many thanks. I have a question. I work for a
    > small company and I am the only one in the company with Linux. Everyone
    > else has Windows. Often people will ask me for help with thier systems. I
    > said that I have a question and here it is; Has it been the experience of
    > this group that using Linux helps you to understand what Windows is doing,
    > or is it the other way around?
    >
    > On the one hand the difference between Linux and Windows seems to be similar
    > to the difference between a manual and automatic transmission on a car. The
    > automatic is less efficent but it does the shifting for you. The manual
    > transmission is more efficient, but you have to know what you are doing.
    > Both transmissions shift gears.
    >
    > On the other hand I found myself typing in ls at the Windows command prompt
    > the other day. This is not a big problem right now, but our company is
    > growing. We don't have an IT department right now, but we can forsee
    > needing one. If we do get an IT department I can almost garentee that I
    > will be the only member for some time. I don't see being able to get the
    > entire company switched to Linux because I think that most of my co-workers
    > would be unable to use it.
    >
    >


    I actively use Windows and Linux opearting systems. I use applications
    that require one or the other. Some I can use on both, e.g. Mozilla,
    OpenOffice, etc.

    I know that the majority of Windows users don't know anything about
    Linux, and many have not even heard of it. The majority of Linux users
    seem to hate Windows. I have no time for for either viewpoint or
    discussion.

    At your business, focus on the applications in their support of business
    processes. In your small company, hopefully few are really using Linux
    or Windows. They shouldn't really be thinking about the OS. They are
    using the higher level applications to make the business go: email,
    information on the web, documents in a word procesor, personal analysis
    in spreadsheets, presentation material, financial transaction
    accounting, views of production data obtained manually or automatically,
    etc. None of that really entails trying to figure out what the
    operating system is doing.

    Before you get yourself burned out trying to be a one-person IT
    department where you don't use and know the same technology as used by
    the the others in your company ... step back and think about what
    service you are providing and what people ought to be doing with their
    computers. Then do it. If you wish to migrate the business to more
    Linux-based software, start building a business case to do it. What are
    the costs? What are the savings (one-time and on-going)? What are the
    risks? What are the benefits? Present and discuss this with the boss.

    Meantime, make sure you have a network firewall (Linux box?), that all
    Linux and Windows machines are kept up to date with the appropriate
    updates from Microsoft and the Linux vendor, and that you have adequate
    Virus detection software in place. These all required to manage the
    risks associated with the business by using computing technology.


  8. Re: The lone Linux user

    Thanks for the replies



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