Options for lightweight laptops - Portable

This is a discussion on Options for lightweight laptops - Portable ; Hi: The Centrino allows a laptop to be very light. I would like to buy a lightweight laptop but I do not want to invest in technology that is not mostly linux compatible. What are other good options that are ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Options for lightweight laptops

  1. Options for lightweight laptops

    Hi:

    The Centrino allows a laptop to be very light. I would like to buy
    a lightweight laptop but I do not want to invest in technology that is not
    mostly linux compatible.

    What are other good options that are :
    1. Linux compatible.
    2. Lightweight.
    3. Full featured.
    4. Commonly available.
    5. From a good vendor.

    Thank You

    Matthew

  2. Re: Options for lightweight laptops

    On 9 Oct 2003 10:27:41 -0700, Matthew Harelick staggered into the Black
    Sun and said:
    > I would like to buy a lightweight laptop but I do not want to invest
    > in [Centrino] technology that is not mostly linux compatible.
    >
    > What are other good options that are :
    > 1. Linux compatible. 2. Lightweight. 3. Full featured.


    How lightweight is "lightweight"? What's your upper bound for laptop
    weight, in pounds (or kg, if you're not 'Murrican.)? EXPN "full
    featured". You want high battery life, excellent gaming, IEEE1394
    ports, built-in 802.11b, floppy drive, big screen, what? You want a
    laptop with built-in Yak Shaver 3000, you gotta say so.

    Also, pages like http://www.cse.unsw.edu.au/~andrewb/x31.html
    show that lots of stuff on these Centrino-based laptops works reasonably
    well with recent kernels. Built-in 802.11b may not work, but who cares
    when Orinoco Gold PCMCIA cards are ~$60?

    > 4. Commonly available. 5. From a good vendor.


    "Commonly available"? Um, you order the machine online, UPFedEx
    delivers it. I've never seen a laptop I'd consider buying in a
    CompUselessA or Worst Buy or even the local computer parts store; they
    mostly sell HPCompaq/Sony garbage that looks good and is designed to
    suck money from the clueless.

    "From a good vendor"? All vendors suck. Buy a machine that's built
    well (this excludes many Sony Vaios) and you won't have to deal with
    vendor service for a while. All my laptops have been IBM (and
    refurbished), and I've only had 1 mechanical problem since early 2000.
    IBM keyboards rock, they have Trackpoints, most models work well with
    Linux, they're built pretty solidly, and semi-detailed field circus
    manuals with IBM part numbers are available on IBM's website. If I were
    looking for a light laptop, I'd check the X31, but my A22p will last
    another year. HTH,

    --
    Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to see
    Brainbench MVP for Linux Admin / mail: TRAP + SPAN don't belong
    http://www.brainbench.com / "He is a rhythmic movement of the
    -----------------------------/ penguins, is Tux." --MegaHAL

  3. Re: Options for lightweight laptops

    Dances With Crows wrote:

    > Buy*a*machine*that's*built
    > well (this excludes many Sony Vaios)


    Agree, bought a sony for the wife with xp and it was nothing but crashes all
    the time. Took it back to where I was sold to it (WorstBuy). They wanted to
    keep %15 of the original price which translated into about $170. I demanded
    they sell me a Toshiba which I was looking for originally (which they did
    not have in stock) or give me my full refund. After arguing a bit I got my
    full refund and bought a Toshiba somewhere else.

    Including this one, we have had four Toshibas in past 10/12 years and have
    no complaint. Sony Sucks so does BestBuy.



  4. Re: Options for lightweight laptops

    Dances With Crows wrote in message news:...
    > On 9 Oct 2003 10:27:41 -0700, Matthew Harelick staggered into the Black
    > Sun and said:
    > > I would like to buy a lightweight laptop but I do not want to invest
    > > in [Centrino] technology that is not mostly linux compatible.
    > >
    > > What are other good options that are :
    > > 1. Linux compatible. 2. Lightweight. 3. Full featured.

    >
    > How lightweight is "lightweight"? What's your upper bound for laptop
    > weight, in pounds (or kg, if you're not 'Murrican.)? EXPN "full
    > featured". You want high battery life, excellent gaming, IEEE1394
    > ports, built-in 802.11b, floppy drive, big screen, what? You want a
    > laptop with built-in Yak Shaver 3000, you gotta say so.
    >


    The laptop should not weigh more than 4 lbs. I can live with slower
    performance, but not the bad performance that has been reported for
    the Transmeta chips. I have looked at the Fujitsu Lifebook P -
    Series, but they appeared (at least the ones in the store) to be
    shoddily made. I don't need gaming ability, but I would like a screen
    that does not cause irritation.

    I need accessible PCMCIA slots, rather than having to open up the box.

    Some vendors are better than others. Dell used to give pretty good
    customer
    service, but they have sloughed off lately.

    Matthew

    I essentially need a machine that I can use on the train and the bus,
    that I can carry around with books and other things without breaking
    my arm.
    > Also, pages like http://www.cse.unsw.edu.au/~andrewb/x31.html
    > show that lots of stuff on these Centrino-based laptops works reasonably
    > well with recent kernels. Built-in 802.11b may not work, but who cares
    > when Orinoco Gold PCMCIA cards are ~$60?
    >
    > > 4. Commonly available. 5. From a good vendor.

    >
    > "Commonly available"? Um, you order the machine online, UPFedEx
    > delivers it. I've never seen a laptop I'd consider buying in a
    > CompUselessA or Worst Buy or even the local computer parts store; they
    > mostly sell HPCompaq/Sony garbage that looks good and is designed to
    > suck money from the clueless.
    >
    > "From a good vendor"? All vendors suck. Buy a machine that's built
    > well (this excludes many Sony Vaios) and you won't have to deal with
    > vendor service for a while. All my laptops have been IBM (and
    > refurbished), and I've only had 1 mechanical problem since early 2000.
    > IBM keyboards rock, they have Trackpoints, most models work well with
    > Linux, they're built pretty solidly, and semi-detailed field circus
    > manuals with IBM part numbers are available on IBM's website. If I were
    > looking for a light laptop, I'd check the X31, but my A22p will last
    > another year. HTH,


  5. Re: Options for lightweight laptops

    On 13 Oct 2003 08:12:46 -0700, Matthew Harelick wrote:

    > Dances With Crows wrote in message news:...
    >> On 9 Oct 2003 10:27:41 -0700, Matthew Harelick staggered into the Black
    >> Sun and said:
    >>> I would like to buy a lightweight laptop but I do not want to invest
    >>> in [Centrino] technology that is not mostly linux compatible.
    >>>



    Matthew;

    Check out http://reviews.cnet.com/4521-6527_7-...tml?tag=subnav.
    This is not exhaustive nor necessarily up-to-the-moment but, it'll give you
    a good overview of the lightweights available. Pick two or three and then
    google their linux compatability. Without knowing what flavor of linux or
    which version, it's hard to go much further.

    let us know how it goes.

    -Ungoy

  6. Re: Options for lightweight laptops

    On Thu, 09 Oct 2003 10:27:41 -0700, Matthew Harelick wrote:

    > Hi:
    >
    > The Centrino allows a laptop to be very light. I would like to buy
    > a lightweight laptop but I do not want to invest in technology that is not
    > mostly linux compatible.
    >
    > What are other good options that are :
    > 1. Linux compatible.
    > 2. Lightweight.
    > 3. Full featured.
    > 4. Commonly available.
    > 5. From a good vendor.
    >
    > Thank You
    >
    > Matthew


    Do what I did, and go to the IBM ebay store and buy one of the "T" series
    of laptops, they are light (well IMHO) and I was able to get all items
    (even the "winmodem") working except playing DVD movies and I know
    I can get it working, I just have not spent the time to finish with that,

    They are a solid laptop and have all the features one would want (mine has
    serial port, usb, wireless ethernet, wired ethernet, infrared, keyboard
    light, Ultrabay that allows second hard drive or other drive, pcmcia
    slots, sound etc).
    Unless of course you want some whiz-bang stuff I would stick with the
    Thinkpad series, IBM even acknowledges Linux on their website, but it
    really wasn't too hard getting mine playing with SuSE 8.2pro...

    So goto ebay and look for the IBM store, they have two, one is for
    refurbished units and one is for new ones...

    Good luck

    Douglas Cole
    Registered Linux user #188922


+ Reply to Thread