best filesystem for laptop - Portable

This is a discussion on best filesystem for laptop - Portable ; I have used ext2 and ReiserFS on my desktops. But when I put Reiser on my laptop, it keeps spinning up the disk periodically which will not allow hte machine to take full advantage of APM. Any parameters I should ...

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  1. best filesystem for laptop

    I have used ext2 and ReiserFS on my desktops. But when I put Reiser on my
    laptop, it keeps spinning up the disk periodically which will not allow hte
    machine to take full advantage of APM. Any parameters I should set, or is
    a different filesystem better?

  2. Re: best filesystem for laptop

    > I have used ext2 and ReiserFS on my desktops. But when I put Reiser on my
    > laptop, it keeps spinning up the disk periodically which will not allow hte
    > machine to take full advantage of APM. Any parameters I should set, or is
    > a different filesystem better?


    Journaling filesystems have to write periodically to the harddrive
    ("commits"), but try ext3 with the latop-mode kernelpatch, this will
    keep ext3 from doing commits every 10(?)seconds. If really not needed
    the harddrive might stay quiet for up to 10 minutes.
    See the readme for more.

    I successfully use it on my iBook2 ATM where this patch came with the
    2.4.21-benh2 patch.

    -Thomas


  3. Re: best filesystem for laptop

    Thomas Otto writes:
    > Journaling filesystems have to write periodically to the harddrive
    > ("commits"), but try ext3 with the latop-mode kernelpatch, this will
    > keep ext3 from doing commits every 10(?)seconds. If really not needed
    > the harddrive might stay quiet for up to 10 minutes.
    > See the readme for more.
    >
    > I successfully use it on my iBook2 ATM where this patch came with the
    > 2.4.21-benh2 patch.


    I wonder whether it makes sense to journal to a flash card instead of
    to the hard drive. Periodically the flash card contents could be
    flush to the hard drive.

  4. Re: best filesystem for laptop

    Oops! Paul Rubin was seen spray-painting on a wall:
    > Thomas Otto writes:
    >> Journaling filesystems have to write periodically to the harddrive
    >> ("commits"), but try ext3 with the latop-mode kernelpatch, this will
    >> keep ext3 from doing commits every 10(?)seconds. If really not needed
    >> the harddrive might stay quiet for up to 10 minutes.
    >> See the readme for more.
    >>
    >> I successfully use it on my iBook2 ATM where this patch came with the
    >> 2.4.21-benh2 patch.

    >
    > I wonder whether it makes sense to journal to a flash card instead of
    > to the hard drive. Periodically the flash card contents could be
    > flush to the hard drive.


    That's attractive, but not _quite_ right.

    Unfortunately, flash cards have a limited lifetime (e.g. limited
    number of writes), and this is going to absolutely _hammer_ the flash
    card with writes.

    So, yes, that's feasible, but what it means is you should get an 8MB
    card (I have seen them available for about $5), configure for an 8MB
    journal, and figure on replacing it fairly often.
    --
    If this was helpful, rate me
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    "IBM may have originated Not Invented Here, but Microsoft has managed
    to squander their mountain of technical talent by not harvesting prior
    art until the rain of flaming hardware makes it difficult for the
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  5. Re: best filesystem for laptop

    On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 11:57:52 +0200, Thomas Otto
    wrote in comp.os.linux.portable:

    >Journaling filesystems have to write periodically to the harddrive
    >("commits"), but try ext3 with the latop-mode kernelpatch, this will
    >keep ext3 from doing commits every 10(?)seconds. If really not needed
    >the harddrive might stay quiet for up to 10 minutes.
    >See the readme for more.


    Most journalled filesystems suffer from a recursive update problem because
    each journal commit operation generates new meta-data which is then dumped
    back into the queue.

    You can substantially reduce the number of writes by mounting your
    filesystems with atime updates turned off. This will almost eliminate the
    recursive meta-data-update problem.

    ISTR this breaks "make", however, so it may not be possible to turn off
    atime on systems used for software compiling.


  6. Re: best filesystem for laptop

    On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 16:36:31 GMT, Chris staggered into the Black Sun and
    said:
    > On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 11:57:52 +0200, Thomas Otto
    > wrote in comp.os.linux.portable:
    >
    >>Journaling filesystems have to write periodically to the harddrive
    >>("commits"), but try ext3 with the latop-mode kernelpatch, this will
    >>keep ext3 from doing commits every 10(?)seconds. If really not needed

    >
    > Most journalled filesystems suffer from a recursive update problem
    > because each journal commit operation generates new meta-data which is
    > then dumped back into the queue.
    >
    > You can substantially reduce the number of writes by mounting your
    > filesystems with atime updates turned off. This will almost eliminate
    > the recursive meta-data-update problem. ISTR this breaks "make",
    > however


    It does? That doesn't jive with my experience at all:

    mount | grep home
    /dev/hda7 on /home type reiserfs (rw,noatime)
    cd /home/me/packages/Steamband_031_src/src ; rm -f *.o ; make
    (everything gets compiled since all the .o files are gone)
    touch z-form.c ; make
    (only z-form.c gets compiled)

    > so it may not be possible to turn off atime on systems used for
    > software compiling.


    Nah. From "man make":

    The make program uses the makefile data base and the last-modification
    times of the files to decide which of the files need to be updated.

    ....make uses mtime, not atime, in other words. I hate to think what a
    make that used atime would do on a big project!

    --
    Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to see
    Brainbench MVP for Linux Admin /
    http://www.brainbench.com / "He is a rhythmic movement of the
    -----------------------------/ penguins, is Tux." --MegaHAL

  7. Re: best filesystem for laptop

    Frank schrieb:

    > machine to take full advantage of APM. Any parameters I should set,
    > or is a different filesystem better?


    Try out JFS, it seems to commit only if there are changes to the
    filesystem. The harddisc on my thinkpad goes to sleep and stay until
    pressing a key.

    Bye Eric

  8. Re: best filesystem for laptop

    Christopher Browne wrote:

    >> I wonder whether it makes sense to journal to a flash card instead of
    >> to the hard drive. Periodically the flash card contents could be
    >> flush to the hard drive.

    >
    > That's attractive, but not quite right.
    >
    > Unfortunately, flash cards have a limited lifetime (e.g. limited
    > number of writes), and this is going to absolutely hammer the flash
    > card with writes.


    why not use a ramdisk instead?

  9. Re: best filesystem for laptop

    Lukas Kraehenbuehl writes:
    > >> I wonder whether it makes sense to journal to a flash card instead of
    > >> to the hard drive. Periodically the flash card contents could be
    > >> flush to the hard drive.

    > >
    > > That's attractive, but not quite right.
    > >
    > > Unfortunately, flash cards have a limited lifetime (e.g. limited
    > > number of writes), and this is going to absolutely hammer the flash
    > > card with writes.

    >
    > why not use a ramdisk instead?


    The idea of a flash card is it doesn't lose its contents on system
    crashes.

    Flash cards are good for millions of write cycles, but yeah, if
    there's an update every few seconds, maybe write wear starts to be an
    issue.

    There are also PCMCIA SRAM cards, which are very nice, but have much
    lower capacity and $/MB than flash cards.

  10. Re: best filesystem for laptop

    Lukas Kraehenbuehl wrote:

    >> Unfortunately, flash cards have a limited lifetime (e.g. limited
    >> number of writes), and this is going to absolutely hammer the flash
    >> card with writes.

    >
    > why not use a ramdisk instead?
    >


    And when the power dies?

    --

    Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

    To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
    james.knott.

  11. Re: best filesystem for laptop

    On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 02:49:10 -0400, Frank wrote:

    > I have used ext2 and ReiserFS on my desktops. But when I put Reiser on my
    > laptop, it keeps spinning up the disk periodically which will not allow hte
    > machine to take full advantage of APM. Any parameters I should set, or is
    > a different filesystem better?

    I have the Ext3 on both desktop and a laptop, had a few power outages
    without destroying the file system

    Paul

  12. Re: best filesystem for laptop

    After takin a swig o' Arrakan spice grog, Lukas Kraehenbuehl belched out...:
    > Christopher Browne wrote:
    >>> I wonder whether it makes sense to journal to a flash card instead of
    >>> to the hard drive. Periodically the flash card contents could be
    >>> flush to the hard drive.

    >>
    >> That's attractive, but not quite right.
    >>
    >> Unfortunately, flash cards have a limited lifetime (e.g. limited
    >> number of writes), and this is going to absolutely hammer the flash
    >> card with writes.

    >
    > why not use a ramdisk instead?


    That's a thought; you'll lose ALL the files every time you reboot, and
    eliminate all the annoying things about reading them in.
    --
    (reverse (concatenate 'string "gro.mca" "@" "enworbbc"))
    http://www3.sympatico.ca/cbbrowne/advocacy.html
    "Computers are like air conditioners: They stop working properly if
    you open windows."

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