Postfix with no permanent address? - Portable

This is a discussion on Postfix with no permanent address? - Portable ; Okay, this is a bit tricky. I'd like my laptop to use Postfix for all email routing and Fetchmail to, well, fetch mail from my remote accounts. The problem is that I'm a bit of a n00b when it comes ...

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Thread: Postfix with no permanent address?

  1. Postfix with no permanent address?

    Okay, this is a bit tricky. I'd like my laptop to use Postfix for all
    email routing and Fetchmail to, well, fetch mail from my remote
    accounts. The problem is that I'm a bit of a n00b when it comes to
    email routing and I have no idea how to go about it. I use my laptop
    primarily as a client from any number of sites-- my ISP, work, and
    various wireless hotspots-- and most of the examples I see, for both
    Postfix and Sendmail, require a fully qualified domain name, which my
    laptop is more or less guaranteed not to have.

    Is there a tutorial for Mobile Postfix?

    Elf

  2. Re: Postfix with no permanent address?

    "Elf M. Sternberg" writes:

    ]Okay, this is a bit tricky. I'd like my laptop to use Postfix for all
    ]email routing and Fetchmail to, well, fetch mail from my remote
    ]accounts. The problem is that I'm a bit of a n00b when it comes to
    ]email routing and I have no idea how to go about it. I use my laptop
    ]primarily as a client from any number of sites-- my ISP, work, and
    ]various wireless hotspots-- and most of the examples I see, for both
    ]Postfix and Sendmail, require a fully qualified domain name, which my
    ]laptop is more or less guaranteed not to have.

    ]Is there a tutorial for Mobile Postfix?

    No idea. But it sounds to me like you want to use postfix to send mail
    out, and fetchmail to bring in your email from local sites. You also
    probably want one domain name attached to your outgoing mail, not a
    return address which depends on which machine you happen to be on.

    Remember however that a number of organisations refuse to accept mail
    from DHCP (ie dynamic) IP addresses, so if your IP in those sites are
    dynamic, you may find much of your mail bouncing.

    Anyway, in postfix, the line myorigin is your friend. it is what is
    tacked onto your return address.

    Using postfix to receive mail is pretty useless for you since the world
    has no idea where to deliver the mail to. You keep moving. So I assume
    you have a machine with a permanant IP to which your mail is delivered.
    Ie, that is the address which you use in myorigin.



    ] Elf

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