Re: PCI IRQ Routing table - forcing values - Portable

This is a discussion on Re: PCI IRQ Routing table - forcing values - Portable ; Hi Pete, I agree, ACPI is certainly the way to go with newer laptops, but this one is about 5 years old now, so most likely, it won't be ACPI compliant. I do recall that when I had Windows installed ...

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Thread: Re: PCI IRQ Routing table - forcing values

  1. Re: PCI IRQ Routing table - forcing values

    Hi Pete,

    I agree, ACPI is certainly the way to go with newer laptops, but this one
    is about 5 years old now, so most likely, it won't be ACPI compliant.

    I do recall that when I had Windows installed on this computer at one
    stage, there was mention of ACPI in the device manager, but I don't think
    that this is necessarily referring to assignment of resources (although I
    do find it a little strange).

    Do you (or anyone else reading this) know of a way to check (other than
    recompiling the Kernel) to see if this notebook has ACPI?

  2. Re: PCI IRQ Routing table - forcing values

    In <20030625215535.51af92f4.no@spam.com>, Mr-T wrote:

    > Hi Pete,
    >
    > I agree, ACPI is certainly the way to go with newer laptops, but this
    > one is about 5 years old now, so most likely, it won't be ACPI
    > compliant.
    >
    > I do recall that when I had Windows installed on this computer at one
    > stage, there was mention of ACPI in the device manager, but I don't
    > think that this is necessarily referring to assignment of resources
    > (although I do find it a little strange).
    >
    > Do you (or anyone else reading this) know of a way to check (other than
    > recompiling the Kernel) to see if this notebook has ACPI?


    The ACPI controller should appear as a PCI device, if it exists. You
    should see a device listing from lspci for it. For instance on my desktop
    (even though ACPI is not enabled) I see this:

    00:07.3 Bridge: Intel Corp. 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 ACPI (rev 02)

    Also there may be some settings related to it in the BIOS, although a lack
    thereof does not mean that it doesn't support ACPI. I'd also be skeptical
    of a 5-year old machine supporting ACPI, although it actually has been
    around for a while, if not supported decently under Linux -- I know that
    some Pentium-era hardware I have used supported it.

    --
    Not to have been a dupe, that will have been my best possesion, my best
    deed, to have been a dupe, wishing I wasn't, thinking I wasn't, knowing
    I was, not being a dupe of not being a dupe.
    --Samuel Beckett, The Unnamable


  3. Re: PCI IRQ Routing table - forcing values

    lobotomy wrote:

    > In <20030625215535.51af92f4.no@spam.com>, Mr-T wrote:
    >
    >> Hi Pete,
    >>
    >> I agree, ACPI is certainly the way to go with newer laptops, but this
    >> one is about 5 years old now, so most likely, it won't be ACPI
    >> compliant.
    >>
    >> I do recall that when I had Windows installed on this computer at one
    >> stage, there was mention of ACPI in the device manager, but I don't
    >> think that this is necessarily referring to assignment of resources
    >> (although I do find it a little strange).
    >>
    >> Do you (or anyone else reading this) know of a way to check (other than
    >> recompiling the Kernel) to see if this notebook has ACPI?

    >
    > The ACPI controller should appear as a PCI device, if it exists. You
    > should see a device listing from lspci for it. For instance on my desktop
    > (even though ACPI is not enabled) I see this:
    >
    > 00:07.3 Bridge: Intel Corp. 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 ACPI (rev 02)


    I have several laptops which all use ACPI, and none of them have the ACPI
    controller as a PCI device. They are mainly SIS chip boxes, but I know
    ACPI works on them (in fact some of them have no APM) as the support is
    loaded and used to shutdown the machine.

    David
    >
    > Also there may be some settings related to it in the BIOS, although a lack
    > thereof does not mean that it doesn't support ACPI. I'd also be skeptical
    > of a 5-year old machine supporting ACPI, although it actually has been
    > around for a while, if not supported decently under Linux -- I know that
    > some Pentium-era hardware I have used supported it.
    >



  4. Re: PCI IRQ Routing table - forcing values


    Thanks for the suggestion, but it hasn't solved the problem. The kernel
    reported that there were invalid ACPI PCI IRQ routing tables and other
    messages indicated that ACPI wasn't present.

    I guess I'll have to keep trying or just buy a new notebook.

    > > Also there may be some settings related to it in the BIOS, although a
    > > lack thereof does not mean that it doesn't support ACPI. I'd also be
    > > skeptical of a 5-year old machine supporting ACPI, although it
    > > actually has been around for a while, if not supported decently under
    > > Linux -- I know that some Pentium-era hardware I have used supported
    > > it.
    > >

    >


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