Re: [9fans] Programming tutorial draft - Plan9

This is a discussion on Re: [9fans] Programming tutorial draft - Plan9 ; > On Nov 7, 2008, at 11:09 AM, Dan Cross wrote: > >> On Wed, Nov 5, 2008 at 3:03 AM, Bruce Ellis >> wrote: >>> I'd like to see a you tube video of the troff. >> >> Dude, ...

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Thread: Re: [9fans] Programming tutorial draft

  1. Re: [9fans] Programming tutorial draft

    > On Nov 7, 2008, at 11:09 AM, Dan Cross wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, Nov 5, 2008 at 3:03 AM, Bruce Ellis
    >> wrote:
    >>> I'd like to see a you tube video of the troff.

    >>
    >> Dude, don't tempt me. When (if?) I (ever?) get off of active duty, I
    >> might do a youtube video on troff. I know that's not quite what you
    >> were saying, but it'd be hilarious.
    >>
    >> - Dan C.
    >>
    >> (ps- Bruce, let me know when you'll be stateside again.)
    >>

    >
    > If I made it, it wouldn't be on youtube (I don't want to give up my
    > rights to the video). But I would definitely give it to you, the groff
    > guys, and the Heirloom guys.
    >
    > How is this to start:
    >
    > "This video will teach you troff. What is troff? troff is a document
    > preparation system, much like TeX or Microsoft Word. troff is one of
    > the first of these systems to support fonts in italic and drawing on
    > the page. It was developed by the late Joe Ossanna and is the latest
    > and newest in a long line of document programs.
    > troff is most like TeX in that the document is a text file containing
    > words with formatting commands mixed in. This means you'll have to get
    > used to the command line.
    > Three primary versions of troff are used today. The official version,
    > based of Ossanna's work, is in the Plan 9 from Bell Labs operating
    > system. The most common one is groff, a version made for the GNU
    > project. There is also Heirloom troff, based off the ones by
    > OpenSolaris. All three are free software.
    > So as you can see, troff is a Unix tool. But if you are on Windows,
    > don't despair: there are ports of these tools to Windows. I will be
    > running Plan 9 for my demo.
    >
    > Let's start by creating a simple document. Create a new text file:
    >
    > > first_troff
    >
    > and edit it:
    >
    > acme first_troff
    >
    > Now let's type a few words:
    >
    > hello, world
    >
    > Save your work. In my case, I middle-click the Put at the top.
    > Now comes the fun part. In Plan 9, to preview the document, you say
    >
    > troff first_troff | proof
    >
    > or
    >
    > troff first_troff | page
    >
    > I will use page. With GNU, you convert to a PostScript file and open
    > it with an image viewer:
    >
    > troff first_troff | grops > first_troff.ps
    >
    > (Heirloom goes here.)"



    A video seems like a rather foolish place to try and explain troff,
    since the whole process is a lot of text input and a couple commands.
    There exist plenty of documents on writing troff AND they avoid the
    cutesy "Ok now let's do this... here's what I did... Now the fun
    part" form.


    John



  2. Re: [9fans] Programming tutorial draft

    No! I don't want a video tute on troff. Just a video of you typing in
    the troff. It would certainly be better to look at then your idea of
    how plan9 works.

    brucee

    On Fri, Nov 7, 2008 at 11:17 PM, wrote:
    >> On Nov 7, 2008, at 11:09 AM, Dan Cross wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Wed, Nov 5, 2008 at 3:03 AM, Bruce Ellis
    >>> wrote:
    >>>> I'd like to see a you tube video of the troff.
    >>>
    >>> Dude, don't tempt me. When (if?) I (ever?) get off of active duty, I
    >>> might do a youtube video on troff. I know that's not quite what you
    >>> were saying, but it'd be hilarious.
    >>>
    >>> - Dan C.
    >>>
    >>> (ps- Bruce, let me know when you'll be stateside again.)
    >>>

    >>
    >> If I made it, it wouldn't be on youtube (I don't want to give up my
    >> rights to the video). But I would definitely give it to you, the groff
    >> guys, and the Heirloom guys.
    >>
    >> How is this to start:
    >>
    >> "This video will teach you troff. What is troff? troff is a document
    >> preparation system, much like TeX or Microsoft Word. troff is one of
    >> the first of these systems to support fonts in italic and drawing on
    >> the page. It was developed by the late Joe Ossanna and is the latest
    >> and newest in a long line of document programs.
    >> troff is most like TeX in that the document is a text file containing
    >> words with formatting commands mixed in. This means you'll have to get
    >> used to the command line.
    >> Three primary versions of troff are used today. The official version,
    >> based of Ossanna's work, is in the Plan 9 from Bell Labs operating
    >> system. The most common one is groff, a version made for the GNU
    >> project. There is also Heirloom troff, based off the ones by
    >> OpenSolaris. All three are free software.
    >> So as you can see, troff is a Unix tool. But if you are on Windows,
    >> don't despair: there are ports of these tools to Windows. I will be
    >> running Plan 9 for my demo.
    >>
    >> Let's start by creating a simple document. Create a new text file:
    >>
    >> > first_troff

    >>
    >> and edit it:
    >>
    >> acme first_troff
    >>
    >> Now let's type a few words:
    >>
    >> hello, world
    >>
    >> Save your work. In my case, I middle-click the Put at the top.
    >> Now comes the fun part. In Plan 9, to preview the document, you say
    >>
    >> troff first_troff | proof
    >>
    >> or
    >>
    >> troff first_troff | page
    >>
    >> I will use page. With GNU, you convert to a PostScript file and open
    >> it with an image viewer:
    >>
    >> troff first_troff | grops > first_troff.ps
    >>
    >> (Heirloom goes here.)"

    >
    >
    > A video seems like a rather foolish place to try and explain troff,
    > since the whole process is a lot of text input and a couple commands.
    > There exist plenty of documents on writing troff AND they avoid the
    > cutesy "Ok now let's do this... here's what I did... Now the fun
    > part" form.
    >
    >
    > John
    >
    >
    >



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