[9fans] Is /proc an Plan9 invention ? - Plan9

This is a discussion on [9fans] Is /proc an Plan9 invention ? - Plan9 ; Hi folks, the english wikipedia page on Plan9 implies that procfs was an Plan9 invention. Is this true ? cu -- ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Enrico Weigelt, metux IT service -- http://www.metux.de/ cellphone: +49 174 7066481 email: info@metux.de skype: nekrad666 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Embedded-Linux / ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: [9fans] Is /proc an Plan9 invention ?

  1. [9fans] Is /proc an Plan9 invention ?


    Hi folks,


    the english wikipedia page on Plan9 implies that procfs was
    an Plan9 invention.

    Is this true ?


    cu
    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Enrico Weigelt, metux IT service -- http://www.metux.de/

    cellphone: +49 174 7066481 email: info@metux.de skype: nekrad666
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Embedded-Linux / Portierung / Opensource-QM / Verteilte Systeme
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------


  2. Re: [9fans] Is /proc an Plan9 invention ?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procfs:


    UNIX 8th Edition

    Tom J. Killian

    implemented the UNIX 8th Edition
    version of |/proc|: he
    presented a paper titled "Processes as Files" at USENIX
    in June 1984. The design of procfs
    aimed to replace the /ptrace
    /
    system call used for process tracing.



    Enrico Weigelt escribió:
    > Hi folks,
    >
    >
    > the english wikipedia page on Plan9 implies that procfs was
    > an Plan9 invention.
    >
    > Is this true ?
    >
    >
    > cu
    >




  3. Re: [9fans] Is /proc an Plan9 invention ?

    I'm pretty sure Peter Weinberger (pjw) did the very first, which
    Killian adapted and improved when pjw lost interest.

    The big change in Plan 9 was moving to a true file system hierarchy
    instead of just one file and a pile of ioctls. Linux's /proc is very
    close in overall design.

    -rob


+ Reply to Thread