[9fans] secstore and PAKserver - Plan9

This is a discussion on [9fans] secstore and PAKserver - Plan9 ; I note in /sys/src/cmd/auth/secstore/pak.c: // PAK is an encrypted key exchange protocol designed by Philip MacKenzie et al. // It is patented and use outside Plan 9 requires you get a license. // (All other EKE protocols are patented as ...

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Thread: [9fans] secstore and PAKserver

  1. [9fans] secstore and PAKserver

    I note in /sys/src/cmd/auth/secstore/pak.c:

    // PAK is an encrypted key exchange protocol designed by Philip MacKenzie et al.
    // It is patented and use outside Plan 9 requires you get a license.
    // (All other EKE protocols are patented as well, by Lucent or others.)

    I want to leverage the functionality of the secstore for a different
    application (I'm not yet ready to publicize the details, but I will to
    anyone who shows some interest), but this seems to put a bit of a
    spanner in the works. Naturally, I can prototype with it, but in the
    long term I have either to licence the PAK stuff (who do I contact?)
    or to replace the code with an analogous facility.

    Has the licence been waved for p9p? What are the terms of the
    licence? Does anyone know of licence free options to perform a
    similar function? I suppose I ought to ask what is so special about
    PAK, too or, more to the point, what does it do that made Bell Labs
    choose it for the secstore? Maybe if I understood PAK better I'd be
    able to decide whether it is as important in my application as it was
    for the secstore.

    ++L


  2. Re: [9fans] secstore and PAKserver

    > I want to leverage the functionality of the secstore for a different
    > application (I'm not yet ready to publicize the details, but I will to
    > anyone who shows some interest), but this seems to put a bit of a
    > spanner in the works. Naturally, I can prototype with it, but in the
    > long term I have either to licence the PAK stuff (who do I contact?)
    > or to replace the code with an analogous facility.
    >
    > Has the licence been waved for p9p? What are the terms of the
    > licence? Does anyone know of licence free options to perform a
    > similar function? I suppose I ought to ask what is so special about
    > PAK, too or, more to the point, what does it do that made Bell Labs
    > choose it for the secstore? Maybe if I understood PAK better I'd be
    > able to decide whether it is as important in my application as it was
    > for the secstore.


    I am not a lawyer; this is not legal advice.

    The Lucent Public License permits redistribution of the programs
    contained in the Plan 9 distribution, secstore included, in source
    or binary forms, and includes appropriate copyright and patent
    licenses. I believe that is the only license needed for me to
    distribute the p9p programs. I have no special arrangement
    with Lucent.

    The details are in /LICENSE.

    Of course, in such licensing situations, I have never understood
    where the line is between redistributing the entire Plan 9 software
    (obviously permitted, with copyright and patent licenses granted)
    and redistributing just a few snippets of Plan 9 code that make up
    an insignificant part of a larger program that happens to use
    techniques from those same patents. I'm fairly certain p9p is on
    the first side of that line, but I still don't know where the line is.

    If this really matters to you, you should talk to a lawyer.

    If you're not using Plan 9 code, you might look at SRP.
    I don't think the licensing issues are any less murky than PAK,
    but they are at least more widely studied.

    Russ


  3. Re: [9fans] secstore and PAKserver

    On Tue, Aug 28, 2007 at 06:19:24PM -0400, Russ Cox wrote:
    > If you're not using Plan 9 code, you might look at SRP.
    > I don't think the licensing issues are any less murky than PAK,
    > but they are at least more widely studied.


    There ought to be an SRP implementation for secstore
    lying around somewhere, possibly at the Labs. I did
    one the summer the USENIX security paper got written.

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