[9fans] Hello Assembly - Plan9

This is a discussion on [9fans] Hello Assembly - Plan9 ; > There's an OS (complete with a Window Manager, IDE, Web Browser, and > even some games) written entirely in assembly: http://www.menuetos.net/ > > Everyone has 24 hours in a day, but some use it more than others > i ...

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Thread: [9fans] Hello Assembly

  1. Re: [9fans] Hello Assembly

    > There's an OS (complete with a Window Manager, IDE, Web Browser, and
    > even some games) written entirely in assembly: http://www.menuetos.net/
    >
    > Everyone has 24 hours in a day, but some use it more than others
    >


    i can see from their documentation, that i have been using my time quite
    a bit more effectively:

    "Menuet has no roots within UNIX or the POSIX standards,
    nor is it based on any particular operating system. The design
    goal has been to remove the extra layers between different parts
    of an OS, which normally complicate programming and create bugs.

    here's their write system call:

    rbx - 1 Write

    rcx - Ignored
    rdx - Bytes to save
    rex - Pointer to data
    rfx - Filename pointer

    !?

    - erik

  2. Re: [9fans] Hello Assembly

    In C, it could look like

    Write(char *filename, void *data, uvlong number_of_bytes);

    so I don't think it has an Open syscall, or probably you read
    everything into memory, modify the memory, then write it back. 64-bit
    systems can store quite a bit, but this philosophy will get old
    almost immediately:

    $ sed2c '1s/^/@/' # given sed2c is a program that converts sed
    commands to C
    char *buffer;
    buffer = malloc(FileLen("f"));
    Read("f", buffer, FileLen("f"));
    b[0] = '@';
    Write("f", buffer, strlen(buffer));

    Does that seem like a bit much?

    On Feb 10, 2008, at 1:01 PM, erik quanstrom wrote:

    >> There's an OS (complete with a Window Manager, IDE, Web Browser, and
    >> even some games) written entirely in assembly: http://
    >> www.menuetos.net/
    >>
    >> Everyone has 24 hours in a day, but some use it more than others
    >>

    >
    > i can see from their documentation, that i have been using my time
    > quite
    > a bit more effectively:
    >
    > "Menuet has no roots within UNIX or the POSIX standards,
    > nor is it based on any particular operating system. The design
    > goal has been to remove the extra layers between different parts
    > of an OS, which normally complicate programming and create bugs.
    >
    > here's their write system call:
    >
    > rbx - 1 Write
    >
    > rcx - Ignored
    > rdx - Bytes to save
    > rex - Pointer to data
    > rfx - Filename pointer
    >
    > !?
    >
    > - erik



  3. Re: [9fans] Hello Assembly

    Anant Narayanan writes:

    >> I am working on rewriting an operating system that avoids this
    >> philosophy for the purpose of teaching assembly language. So far, I
    >> have 2% of the code (I started a rewrite), and I don't know if my
    >> code is 100% right.

    >
    > There's an OS (complete with a Window Manager, IDE, Web Browser, and
    >even some games) written entirely in assembly: http://www.menuetos.net/


    Or, if you want something at the other end of the spectrum, there's an
    OS "with modular microkernels using the C# programming language."

    http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post...net-tools.html

    > Everyone has 24 hours in a day, but some use it more than others


    Indeed

    > Anant

    Adrian

  4. Re: [9fans] Hello Assembly

    On Feb 10, 2008, at 9:36 PM, Adrian Tritschler wrote:

    > OS "with modular microkernels using the C# programming language."


    Microsoft has too, and it outdates the other two. Unfortunately, it's
    only available in Microsoft and a select few universities.

    http://research.microsoft.com/os/singularity/



  5. Re: [9fans] Hello Assembly

    Oh, and I can't wait to see those two have GUI support. When I finish
    making my OS C- and portability-friendly, I'm going to start with
    graphics.

    On Feb 10, 2008, at 9:36 PM, Adrian Tritschler wrote:

    > Anant Narayanan writes:
    >
    >>> I am working on rewriting an operating system that avoids this
    >>> philosophy for the purpose of teaching assembly language. So far, I
    >>> have 2% of the code (I started a rewrite), and I don't know if my
    >>> code is 100% right.

    >>
    >> There's an OS (complete with a Window Manager, IDE, Web Browser, and
    >> even some games) written entirely in assembly: http://
    >> www.menuetos.net/

    >
    > Or, if you want something at the other end of the spectrum, there's an
    > OS "with modular microkernels using the C# programming language."
    >
    > http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post...lopers-create-
    > open-source-os-kernels-using-net-tools.html
    >
    >> Everyone has 24 hours in a day, but some use it more than others

    >
    > Indeed
    >
    >> Anant

    > Adrian



  6. Re: [9fans] Hello Assembly

    One more thing. Does anyone know if, in raw x86 assembly, RET implies
    STI? Thanks.


  7. Re: [9fans] Hello Assembly

    > One more thing. Does anyone know if, in raw x86 assembly, RET implies
    > STI? Thanks.


    if it did, it would be impossible to call a function with interrupts off.

    - erik

  8. Re: [9fans] Hello Assembly

    Windows 1, 2 &3 was done in assembler

  9. Re: [9fans] Hello Assembly

    > On Feb 9, 2008 8:17 AM, Brantley Coile wrote:
    >> I would like to hear what Rob or others have to say about the
    >> assembler syntax, but I actually like the syntax for the following
    >> reason.

    >
    > if you love assembly code, the assembler on Plan 9 is not great.
    >
    > If you love assembly code, you are in need of a CAT scan in my view.
    >
    > The v6 manual entry for as called assembly code "the ultimate dead
    > language". If only that had been true.
    >
    > gcc and friends have made the world safe for assembly, and there is more
    > assembly in use than ever.
    >
    > Writing assembly code should be as painful as possible. Plan 9
    > succeeds in that regard. It's a good thing in my view.
    >
    > ron


    And if you can pass off the assembly writing task to an intern, all the
    better, right?

    I don't know... barring certain architecture gotchas, I enjoyed the
    assembly I did; it's sort of a relaxing break from C.

    John "Real Programmers Use FORTRAN" Floren


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