TrueCrypt - PGP

This is a discussion on TrueCrypt - PGP ; TrueCrypt is a free open source on-the-fly encryption (OTFE) program for Microsoft Windows 2000/XP/2003/Vista and Linux. It can create a "file- hosted container" which consists of an encrypted volume with its own file system, contained within a regular file, which ...

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Thread: TrueCrypt

  1. TrueCrypt

    TrueCrypt is a free open source on-the-fly encryption (OTFE) program for
    Microsoft Windows 2000/XP/2003/Vista and Linux. It can create a "file-
    hosted container" which consists of an encrypted volume with its own
    file system, contained within a regular file, which can then be mounted
    as if it were a real disk. TrueCrypt also supports device-hosted
    volumes, which can be created on either an individual partition or an
    entire disk.

    Encryption algorithms
    The encryption algorithms supported by TrueCrypt are AES, Serpent and
    Twofish. It also allows the use of a cascade of different ciphers, for
    instance AES+Twofish+Serpent.


    [edit] Modes of operation
    All encryption algorithms use the LRW mode of operation, which is more
    secure than CBC mode when used with predictable initialization vectors.
    [1] From version 4.1, newly created volumes can be encrypted only in LRW
    mode; however, CBC mode volumes created by previous versions of
    TrueCrypt can still be mounted.[2]


    [edit] Plausible deniability
    One of the notable features of TrueCrypt is that it provides two levels
    of plausible deniability, which might be useful in case a user is
    required to reveal the password of an encrypted volume.


    [edit] Hidden volumes
    Hidden volumes are a steganographic feature that allows a
    second, "hidden" TrueCrypt volume to be created within the free space of
    another TrueCrypt volume.[3] The hidden volume can have its own separate
    file system and uses a different password, encryption algorithm and
    encryption key from that of the host volume, referred to as the "outer"
    volume. Which volume is actually mounted depends on the password
    provided; if the password to the outer volume is provided, the outer
    volume is mounted, and likewise for the inner volume.

    Once a hidden volume has been created inside another TrueCrypt volume,
    the user will store important-looking information (but which the user
    does not actually want to hide) on the outer volume, whereas sensitive
    information is stored within the hidden volume.

    In the event the hidden volume user is forced to reveal their TrueCrypt
    password, they can divulge the password to the outer volume (not
    disclosing the fact that they actually have a hidden volume within), and
    sensitive data within the hidden volume is not compromised.


    [edit] No identifying features
    TrueCrypt volumes, be they stored in a file or a device/partition,
    intentionally do not contain any discernible "signatures" or unencrypted
    headers. As cipher algorithms are designed to be indistinguishable from
    a pseudorandom permutation without knowing the key, the presence of
    encrypted data is also undetectable unless the cipher has weaknesses.
    This means that it is impossible to prove that any file or partition is
    a TrueCrypt volume (rather than random data) without having the password
    to mount it.

    This characteristic also makes it impossible to determine if a volume
    contains another hidden volume.


    [edit] Other features
    Other features include:

    Portable, "traveller mode", which allows TrueCrypt to be run without
    installation.[4]
    Support for creating encrypted sparse files on NTFS drives. These
    volumes grow to accommodate new data, up to a specified maximum file
    size. However, using these files raises several performance and security
    concerns.[5]
    Changing volume passwords and keyfile without losing encrypted data.
    The ability to back up and restore volume headers (1024 bytes).
    This could be used to restore a header to a damaged file, enabling it to
    be mounted after a hardware failure resulting in a damaged header.
    Restoring an old header also resets a volume's password(s) to those
    valid when the header was backed up.

    [edit] History of TrueCrypt

    TrueCrypt Volume Creation Wizard (Windows XP)TrueCrypt is based on
    Encryption for the Masses (E4M). E4M was a popular open-source on-the-
    fly encryption (OTFE) program first released in 1997. However, it was
    discontinued in 2000 as the author, Paul Le Roux, began working on
    commercial OTFE software. The first version of TrueCrypt was released on
    February 2, 2004. At that time, it was the only open-source OTFE
    software that fully supported Windows XP and the only open-source OTFE
    software for Windows XP that provided plausible deniability.

    TrueCrypt 1.0 supported Windows 98/ME and Windows 2000/XP. Version 1.0a,
    released only 1 day later, removed the Windows 98/ME support because the
    author of the Windows 9x driver for E4M claimed he gave no permission
    that would allow his code to be used in projects derived from E4M.[6]

    On June 7, 2004, TrueCrypt 2.0 was released, presumably from a different
    group/authors due to the different signing signature of TrueCrypt
    Foundation. Previous versions were signed by TrueCrypt Team. It was
    released under the GPL. A few weeks later, TrueCrypt 2.1 was released
    under the original E4M license, "to avoid potential problems relating to
    the GPL license."[7]

    On October 1, 2004, TrueCrypt 2.1a was released on SourceForge and
    truecrypt.sourceforge.net became the official TrueCrypt website. As of
    the beginning of May 2005, the official TrueCrypt website is
    truecrypt.org again and the SourceForge website redirects to this site.

    TrueCrypt Version 4.0 was released on November 1, 2005. It added support
    for Linux, x86-64, Big Endian machines, Keyfiles (two-factor
    authentication), the Whirlpool hash algorithm, language packs, and much
    more.

    TrueCrypt Version 4.1 was released on November 26, 2005. It added LRW
    mode, which is more secure than CBC mode for on-the-fly storage
    encryption.[1] LRW mode also neutralized an exploit that could (under
    certain circumstances) be used to compromise the plausible deniability
    of a TrueCrypt volume by allowing it to be distinguished from random
    data.[2]

    TrueCrypt Version 4.2 was released on April 17, 2006. This version added
    various features to the Linux version, such as the ability to create
    volumes, change passwords and keyfiles, generate keyfiles and
    backup/restore volume headers. In the Windows version it introduced
    support for dynamic (sparse file) volumes.

    TrueCrypt Version 4.3 was released on March 19, 2007. This version added
    support for Windows Vista, support for file systems using sector sizes
    other than 512 bytes, and several other feature improvements and
    bugfixes.

    More detailed information is available in the version history.[2]


    [edit] See also
    Free software Portal
    Cryptography Portal
    Disk encryption
    Full disk encryption
    Disk encryption software
    Deniable encryption
    Comparison of disk encryption software

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TrueCrypt


  2. Re: TrueCrypt

    Am Mon, 30 Jul 2007 18:50:03 +0200 (CEST) schrieb Nomen Nescio:

    > TrueCrypt is a free open source on-the-fly encryption (OTFE) program for
    > Microsoft Windows 2000/XP/2003/Vista and Linux. It can create a "file-
    > hosted container" which consists of an encrypted volume with its own
    > file system, contained within a regular file, which can then be mounted
    > as if it were a real disk. TrueCrypt also supports device-hosted
    > volumes, which can be created on either an individual partition or an
    > entire disk.
    >
    > Encryption algorithms
    > The encryption algorithms supported by TrueCrypt are AES, Serpent and
    > Twofish. It also allows the use of a cascade of different ciphers, for
    > instance AES+Twofish+Serpent.
    >
    > [edit] Modes of operation
    > All encryption algorithms use the LRW mode of operation, which is more
    > secure than CBC mode when used with predictable initialization vectors.
    > [1] From version 4.1, newly created volumes can be encrypted only in LRW
    > mode; however, CBC mode volumes created by previous versions of
    > TrueCrypt can still be mounted.[2]
    >
    > [edit] Plausible deniability
    > One of the notable features of TrueCrypt is that it provides two levels
    > of plausible deniability, which might be useful in case a user is
    > required to reveal the password of an encrypted volume.
    >
    > [edit] Hidden volumes
    > Hidden volumes are a steganographic feature that allows a
    > second, "hidden" TrueCrypt volume to be created within the free space of
    > another TrueCrypt volume.[3] The hidden volume can have its own separate
    > file system and uses a different password, encryption algorithm and
    > encryption key from that of the host volume, referred to as the "outer"
    > volume. Which volume is actually mounted depends on the password
    > provided; if the password to the outer volume is provided, the outer
    > volume is mounted, and likewise for the inner volume.
    >
    > Once a hidden volume has been created inside another TrueCrypt volume,
    > the user will store important-looking information (but which the user
    > does not actually want to hide) on the outer volume, whereas sensitive
    > information is stored within the hidden volume.
    >
    > In the event the hidden volume user is forced to reveal their TrueCrypt
    > password, they can divulge the password to the outer volume (not
    > disclosing the fact that they actually have a hidden volume within), and
    > sensitive data within the hidden volume is not compromised.
    >
    > [edit] No identifying features
    > TrueCrypt volumes, be they stored in a file or a device/partition,
    > intentionally do not contain any discernible "signatures" or unencrypted
    > headers. As cipher algorithms are designed to be indistinguishable from
    > a pseudorandom permutation without knowing the key, the presence of
    > encrypted data is also undetectable unless the cipher has weaknesses.
    > This means that it is impossible to prove that any file or partition is
    > a TrueCrypt volume (rather than random data) without having the password
    > to mount it.
    >
    > This characteristic also makes it impossible to determine if a volume
    > contains another hidden volume.
    >
    > [edit] Other features
    > Other features include:
    >
    > Portable, "traveller mode", which allows TrueCrypt to be run without
    > installation.[4]
    > Support for creating encrypted sparse files on NTFS drives. These
    > volumes grow to accommodate new data, up to a specified maximum file
    > size. However, using these files raises several performance and security
    > concerns.[5]
    > Changing volume passwords and keyfile without losing encrypted data.
    > The ability to back up and restore volume headers (1024 bytes).
    > This could be used to restore a header to a damaged file, enabling it to
    > be mounted after a hardware failure resulting in a damaged header.
    > Restoring an old header also resets a volume's password(s) to those
    > valid when the header was backed up.
    >
    > [edit] History of TrueCrypt
    >
    > TrueCrypt Volume Creation Wizard (Windows XP)TrueCrypt is based on
    > Encryption for the Masses (E4M). E4M was a popular open-source on-the-
    > fly encryption (OTFE) program first released in 1997. However, it was
    > discontinued in 2000 as the author, Paul Le Roux, began working on
    > commercial OTFE software. The first version of TrueCrypt was released on
    > February 2, 2004. At that time, it was the only open-source OTFE
    > software that fully supported Windows XP and the only open-source OTFE
    > software for Windows XP that provided plausible deniability.
    >
    > TrueCrypt 1.0 supported Windows 98/ME and Windows 2000/XP. Version 1.0a,
    > released only 1 day later, removed the Windows 98/ME support because the
    > author of the Windows 9x driver for E4M claimed he gave no permission
    > that would allow his code to be used in projects derived from E4M.[6]
    >
    > On June 7, 2004, TrueCrypt 2.0 was released, presumably from a different
    > group/authors due to the different signing signature of TrueCrypt
    > Foundation. Previous versions were signed by TrueCrypt Team. It was
    > released under the GPL. A few weeks later, TrueCrypt 2.1 was released
    > under the original E4M license, "to avoid potential problems relating to
    > the GPL license."[7]
    >
    > On October 1, 2004, TrueCrypt 2.1a was released on SourceForge and
    > truecrypt.sourceforge.net became the official TrueCrypt website. As of
    > the beginning of May 2005, the official TrueCrypt website is
    > truecrypt.org again and the SourceForge website redirects to this site.
    >
    > TrueCrypt Version 4.0 was released on November 1, 2005. It added support
    > for Linux, x86-64, Big Endian machines, Keyfiles (two-factor
    > authentication), the Whirlpool hash algorithm, language packs, and much
    > more.
    >
    > TrueCrypt Version 4.1 was released on November 26, 2005. It added LRW
    > mode, which is more secure than CBC mode for on-the-fly storage
    > encryption.[1] LRW mode also neutralized an exploit that could (under
    > certain circumstances) be used to compromise the plausible deniability
    > of a TrueCrypt volume by allowing it to be distinguished from random
    > data.[2]
    >
    > TrueCrypt Version 4.2 was released on April 17, 2006. This version added
    > various features to the Linux version, such as the ability to create
    > volumes, change passwords and keyfiles, generate keyfiles and
    > backup/restore volume headers. In the Windows version it introduced
    > support for dynamic (sparse file) volumes.
    >
    > TrueCrypt Version 4.3 was released on March 19, 2007. This version added
    > support for Windows Vista, support for file systems using sector sizes
    > other than 512 bytes, and several other feature improvements and
    > bugfixes.
    >
    > More detailed information is available in the version history.[2]
    >
    > [edit] See also
    > Free software Portal
    > Cryptography Portal
    > Disk encryption
    > Full disk encryption
    > Disk encryption software
    > Deniable encryption
    > Comparison of disk encryption software
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TrueCrypt


    Hab ich dir eigentlich schon gesagt, dass man dich im Visier hat, kleiner
    Nomen Nescio. Die unbeschwerten Tage neigen sich ihrem Ende zu. :-)

  3. Re: TrueCrypt

    On 30-Jul-07 at 6:50pm +0200, wrote:

    > The encryption algorithms supported by TrueCrypt are AES, Serpent
    > and Twofish.


    Why not Blowfish? Blowfish has never been broken...

    --_____
    {~._.~} >>>> [ "Glenn P.," ] <<<<
    _( Y )_ -----------------------------------------
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    (_)-(_) (From: "Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory")

    :: Take Note Of The Spam Block On My E-Mail Address! ::

  4. Re: TrueCrypt

    "Glenn P.," wrote in
    news:Pine.LNX.4.61.0708010120250.6170@Bfjrtb.SbkIn yyrl.arg:

    > On 30-Jul-07 at 6:50pm +0200, wrote:
    >
    > > The encryption algorithms supported by TrueCrypt are AES, Serpent
    > > and Twofish.

    >
    > Why not Blowfish? Blowfish has never been broken...


    Twofish is based on Blowfish if I'm not mistaken, which would represent one
    step up and account for the name similarity. Twofish was an AES finalist,
    but was beat out by Rijndael, which became AES. This is all moot though,
    Blowfish is available in TrueCrypt along with a number of other options.

    Encryption: AES, Blowfish, CAST5, Serpent, Triple DES & Twofish.
    And in casecade: AES-Twofish, AES-Twofish-Serpent, Serpent-AES, Serpent-
    Twofish-AES, & Twofish-Serpent.
    Hash: RIPEMD-60, SHA-1 & Whirlpool.

    --
    Paul William Tenny
    http://www.mediapundit.net/ | http://pwtenny.newsvine.com/
    All contact information: http://pwtenny.googlepages.com/contactme.html

  5. Re: TrueCrypt

    Paul William Tenny writes:
    > Twofish is based on Blowfish if I'm not mistaken,


    There is very little resemblance between those two ciphers, even
    though the same group of people worked on both and the algorithms'
    names are sort of related.

  6. Re: TrueCrypt

    Glenn P., wrote:

    > On 30-Jul-07 at 6:50pm +0200, wrote:
    >
    >> The encryption algorithms supported by TrueCrypt are AES, Serpent
    >> and Twofish.

    >
    > Why not Blowfish? Blowfish has never been broken...
    >



    Truecrypt moved to 256-bit key / 128-bit block encryption algorithms.
    (Blowfish is a 64-bit block encryption algorithm)

    --
    OpenPGP: id=18795161E22D3905; preference=signencrypt;
    url=http://guysalias.fateback.com/pgpkeys.txt

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