Understanding DH/DSS/ ? - PGP

This is a discussion on Understanding DH/DSS/ ? - PGP ; I have had PGP262 on my computer for about 8-yrs. I lost interest in PGP but am not trying to get my head straight on DH/DSS. Could some please confirm my understanding of DH/DSS. When creating a key, it will ...

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Thread: Understanding DH/DSS/ ?

  1. Understanding DH/DSS/ ?

    I have had PGP262 on my computer for about 8-yrs. I lost interest
    in PGP but am not trying to get my head straight on DH/DSS.
    Could some please confirm my understanding of DH/DSS.
    When creating a key, it will contain:
    1. A MasterKey pair containing a signing key and a signature
    verification key.
    2. A SubKey pair containing a message decript key and a message
    encrypt key.

    When you send your Public Key "package" to the key server, it will
    contain:
    1. Your encrypt key from the SubKey pair.
    2. Your signing key from your MasterKey pair.

    The Private Key "package" which you keep secret contains:
    1. Your decrypt key from your SubKey pair.
    2. Your signature verification key from your MasterKey pair.

    Key signings by other people are on the MasterKey pair.
    The SubKey pair can be replaced for time to time and the
    new SubKey will still be associated with the MasterKey pair.

    Is this anywhere close?
    Thanks,
    Casey


  2. Re: Understanding DH/DSS/ ?

    Casey wrote in news:MPG.1bbfb50260f71e329897a0
    @news.east.earthlink.net:

    > I have had PGP262 on my computer for about 8-yrs. I lost interest
    > in PGP but am not trying to get my head straight on DH/DSS.
    > Could some please confirm my understanding of DH/DSS.
    > When creating a key, it will contain:
    > 1. A MasterKey pair containing a signing key and a signature
    > verification key.
    > 2. A SubKey pair containing a message decript key and a message
    > encrypt key.
    >
    > When you send your Public Key "package" to the key server, it will
    > contain:
    > 1. Your encrypt key from the SubKey pair.
    > 2. Your signing key from your MasterKey pair.
    >
    > The Private Key "package" which you keep secret contains:
    > 1. Your decrypt key from your SubKey pair.
    > 2. Your signature verification key from your MasterKey pair.
    >
    > Key signings by other people are on the MasterKey pair.
    > The SubKey pair can be replaced for time to time and the
    > new SubKey will still be associated with the MasterKey pair.
    >
    > Is this anywhere close?


    Except for the following, you have it correct.

    Your public key that you send to others, includes your Signature
    verification key (so that others can verify your signature); your private
    key includes your signing key, so that you can make signatures.

    --
    Tom McCune
    My PGP Page & FAQ: http://www.McCune.cc/PGP.htm

  3. Re: Understanding DH/DSS/ ?

    In article <93o5d.243099$bp1.168604@twister.nyroc.rr.com>, news@DELETE_THISmccune.cc says...
    > Casey wrote in news:MPG.1bbfb50260f71e329897a0
    > @news.east.earthlink.net:
    >
    > > I have had PGP262 on my computer for about 8-yrs. I lost interest
    > > in PGP but am not trying to get my head straight on DH/DSS.
    > > Could some please confirm my understanding of DH/DSS.
    > > When creating a key, it will contain:
    > > 1. A MasterKey pair containing a signing key and a signature
    > > verification key.
    > > 2. A SubKey pair containing a message decript key and a message
    > > encrypt key.
    > >
    > > When you send your Public Key "package" to the key server, it will
    > > contain:
    > > 1. Your encrypt key from the SubKey pair.
    > > 2. Your signing key from your MasterKey pair.
    > >
    > > The Private Key "package" which you keep secret contains:
    > > 1. Your decrypt key from your SubKey pair.
    > > 2. Your signature verification key from your MasterKey pair.
    > >
    > > Key signings by other people are on the MasterKey pair.
    > > The SubKey pair can be replaced for time to time and the
    > > new SubKey will still be associated with the MasterKey pair.
    > >
    > > Is this anywhere close?

    >
    > Except for the following, you have it correct.
    >
    > Your public key that you send to others, includes your Signature
    > verification key (so that others can verify your signature); your private
    > key includes your signing key, so that you can make signatures.
    >
    >

    Thanks Tom. I still have a couple of questions, but I need to
    get better organized before I ask
    Casey

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