How could they get something so simple so wrong? - Palmtop

This is a discussion on How could they get something so simple so wrong? - Palmtop ; I was excited to hear that Palm finally released a software update for the unlocked version of the Treo 680. I bought one of these when they first came out in 2006, at a cost of $400, and I have ...

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Thread: How could they get something so simple so wrong?

  1. How could they get something so simple so wrong?

    I was excited to hear that Palm finally released a software update for
    the unlocked version of the Treo 680. I bought one of these when they
    first came out in 2006, at a cost of $400, and I have been
    disappointed that Palm chose to release updates for the AT&T customers
    first while neglecting its early adopters for more than a year.

    However, my excitement has fast turned to frustration. I downloaded
    and ran Palm's installer as instructed. I was a bit concerned that
    they said it could take 30 minutes to do the upgrade, and that they
    would backup and restore my whole phone in the process, but I figured
    they must have tested this quite a bit, right?

    So I run the thing and the first thing it says is, "resetting the
    device before starting update". I look over at my phone, and it is
    indeed resetting. I think, this is a weird way to start an update, but
    whatever.

    20 seconds goes by and the updater says "Device connection failed".
    The phone is still booting. I figure maybe it's a fluke, so I try it
    again, and again, and again. Same thing.

    How ridiculous is this? The program resets my phone, then complains
    that my phone isn't there? What does it expect? Do they not know how
    long a Treo takes to reset?

    Tech support told me I should perform a hard reset of my phone and
    erase all my data to fix the problem. I mean, what a bunch of ****ups
    these people are. They sell you a powerful computer, with a bunch of
    memory and all kinds of add-on apps you can install, and then the
    thing is so fragile you have to erase it to upgrade the operating
    system? It would be one thing if I thought that the Palm Desktop was
    actually backing up everything on my phone, but I have been told
    repeatedly that it isn't and I need special extra-cost software if I
    want to be safe. So there's no way I'm going to just randomly erase my
    whole phone.

    I told that tech support guy to forget it, that I had already figured
    out how to "upgrade" my phone on my own - I'm trading it in for an
    iPhone as soon as I can. Say what you want about Apple and iPhone, but
    at least they release regular updates to their software, and they
    don't tell you to "erase all data" whenever something happens that
    their minimum-wage support guy can't figure out.

    Frank

  2. Re: How could they get something so simple so wrong?

    On Thu, 17 Jan 2008 18:11:03 -0800 (PST), flarosa
    wrote:

    >I was excited to hear that Palm finally released a software update for
    >the unlocked version of the Treo 680. I bought one of these when they
    >first came out in 2006, at a cost of $400, and I have been
    >disappointed that Palm chose to release updates for the AT&T customers
    >first while neglecting its early adopters for more than a year.
    >
    >However, my excitement has fast turned to frustration. I downloaded
    >and ran Palm's installer as instructed. I was a bit concerned that
    >they said it could take 30 minutes to do the upgrade, and that they
    >would backup and restore my whole phone in the process, but I figured
    >they must have tested this quite a bit, right?
    >
    >So I run the thing and the first thing it says is, "resetting the
    >device before starting update". I look over at my phone, and it is
    >indeed resetting. I think, this is a weird way to start an update, but
    >whatever.
    >
    >20 seconds goes by and the updater says "Device connection failed".
    >The phone is still booting. I figure maybe it's a fluke, so I try it
    >again, and again, and again. Same thing.
    >
    >How ridiculous is this? The program resets my phone, then complains
    >that my phone isn't there? What does it expect? Do they not know how
    >long a Treo takes to reset?
    >
    >Tech support told me I should perform a hard reset of my phone and
    >erase all my data to fix the problem. I mean, what a bunch of ****ups
    >these people are. They sell you a powerful computer, with a bunch of
    >memory and all kinds of add-on apps you can install, and then the
    >thing is so fragile you have to erase it to upgrade the operating
    >system? It would be one thing if I thought that the Palm Desktop was
    >actually backing up everything on my phone, but I have been told
    >repeatedly that it isn't and I need special extra-cost software if I
    >want to be safe. So there's no way I'm going to just randomly erase my
    >whole phone.
    >
    >I told that tech support guy to forget it, that I had already figured
    >out how to "upgrade" my phone on my own - I'm trading it in for an
    >iPhone as soon as I can. Say what you want about Apple and iPhone, but
    >at least they release regular updates to their software, and they
    >don't tell you to "erase all data" whenever something happens that
    >their minimum-wage support guy can't figure out.
    >
    >Frank


    Palm has had ****-for-brains people doing tech support for years.

    The worst part of Palm aren't their support people anymore.

    It's the imbeciles who write code for them now.

    I suppose anyone with a brain has left Palm by now as it's obvious
    they are going down the tubes.

    So they seem to have to outsource their code development for the Palm
    Desktop - apparently to a company called ACCESS:

    http://www.access-company.com/home.html

    How ****ed up is it when you not only have to outsource support but
    now writing the code that allows your device to work?

    I won't mention Windows Mobile either.

    This is really pretty funny when you think about it because some
    corporate jackass at Palm is sitting in a room with other nodding head
    jackasses and saying this is good for business.

    I think this entire industry is taking a major ****.

    This is a bit of a tangent, but here's another example:

    In the past few weeks the indexing (search) function in Outlook 2007
    just stopped working. From posts, I can see others have encountered
    this.

    How does a company that has billions of dollars at it's disposal ****
    up the one primary function one needs to perform on contacts - namely
    - search for them by something as simple as a category...

    Sometimes I just have to sit in stunned silence when I find out these
    are known unresolved issues.

    Granted, I know at least part of this indexing/search problem is
    because MS thinks they have to do something for the dim bulb assheads
    who are too stupid to figure out how to find files in a directory
    structure and this new Vista "feature" was supposed to help.

    Some people shouldn't be allowed behind the wheel if they can't drive
    a machine.

    Maybe that's half the problem - they are trying to figure out how to
    allow stupid people to use devices they are way too stupid to learn to
    use...

    Well, as long as it has cool ring tones and comes in breast cancer
    awareness pink who gives a ****...

  3. Re: How could they get something so simple so wrong?

    On Thu, 17 Jan 2008 22:06:01 -0500, Li RM
    wrote:

    >So they seem to have to outsource their code development for the Palm
    >Desktop - apparently to a company called ACCESS:
    >
    >http://www.access-company.com/home.html
    >
    >How ****ed up is it when you not only have to outsource support but
    >now writing the code that allows your device to work?


    I'm not going to go out of my way to defend Palm here but it's worth
    pointing out that ACCESS, not Palm, is the company which actually owns
    the PalmOS.

    A few years ago when there were several companies which used the
    PalmOS (Palm, Handspring, Sony, HandEra, and others) Palm actually
    split into two different companies (PalmOne for hardware and
    PalmSource for software) to try to foster this new "Palm Economy" by
    assuring its licensees that it wouldn't take unfair advantage of
    because it owned the PalmOS. Long story short, the Palm Economy didn't
    last and Palm licensees began dropping the PalmOS after Cobalt,
    PalmSource's next generation PalmOS was rejected by every licensee
    including PalmOne. PalmSource started over with a Linux-based version
    and developed strong ties with Chinese developers. This attracted the
    attention of ACCESS, a Japanese mobile software company which bought
    PalmSource.

    A lot of Palm's problems today can be traced to this saga. It was a
    huge mess but Palm is actually in better shape now than they were
    around 2000 when all of this crazy maneuvering happened.
    --
    "This is a revolution dammit! We're going to have to offend
    somebody."
    -- John Adams in "1776"

    Roberto Castillo
    robertocastillo@ameritech.net
    http://zombie-gulch.myminicity.com/

  4. Re: How could they get something so simple so wrong?

    On Thu, 17 Jan 2008 23:37:10 -0600, Zombie Elvis
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 17 Jan 2008 22:06:01 -0500, Li RM
    >wrote:
    >
    >>So they seem to have to outsource their code development for the Palm
    >>Desktop - apparently to a company called ACCESS:
    >>
    >>http://www.access-company.com/home.html
    >>
    >>How ****ed up is it when you not only have to outsource support but
    >>now writing the code that allows your device to work?

    >
    >I'm not going to go out of my way to defend Palm here but it's worth
    >pointing out that ACCESS, not Palm, is the company which actually owns
    >the PalmOS.
    >
    >A few years ago when there were several companies which used the
    >PalmOS (Palm, Handspring, Sony, HandEra, and others) Palm actually
    >split into two different companies (PalmOne for hardware and
    >PalmSource for software) to try to foster this new "Palm Economy" by
    >assuring its licensees that it wouldn't take unfair advantage of
    >because it owned the PalmOS. Long story short, the Palm Economy didn't
    >last and Palm licensees began dropping the PalmOS after Cobalt,
    >PalmSource's next generation PalmOS was rejected by every licensee
    >including PalmOne. PalmSource started over with a Linux-based version
    >and developed strong ties with Chinese developers. This attracted the
    >attention of ACCESS, a Japanese mobile software company which bought
    >PalmSource.
    >
    >A lot of Palm's problems today can be traced to this saga. It was a
    >huge mess but Palm is actually in better shape now than they were
    >around 2000 when all of this crazy maneuvering happened.


    This makes perfect sense.

    The assheads who run Palm can just disavow any responsibility for the
    software end of their devices and lousy development of same simply
    because they don't own it.

    I hope the mensa candidate at Palm who came up with this idea doesn't
    forget to include it in his soon-to-be-a-blockbuster business book:

    "Stunningly ****ing Moronic Business Models for the New Millennium (or
    how we sent a once great company into the ****hole while
    simultaneously making ourselves the laughing stock of the PDA
    industry)".

    I remember some 10 years back or so a couple of the Palm people broke
    off and formed Handspring - I think Dubinsky was the name of one of
    them - I don't remember the other.

    Handspring had their **** together and made a good product - the Visor
    and Visor Deluxe.

    In fact I still have a Visor Deluxe tucked away in a box somewhere.

    I loved that little machine.

    I don't know the in's and out's of why Handspring folded, but it seems
    that it was at least part of the melodramatic and psychotic business
    history that has been Palm.

    We'll see if they pull themselves out of the crapper, but I think it's
    going to be too little too late.

    The bottom line for me is the T/X will probably be my last Palm OS
    device. RIM is doing good things with the Blackberry and it appears
    they will be writing Palm's obituary.

  5. Re: How could they get something so simple so wrong?

    On Fri, 18 Jan 2008 09:35:44 -0500, Li RM wrote:

    > On Thu, 17 Jan 2008 23:37:10 -0600, Zombie Elvis
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 17 Jan 2008 22:06:01 -0500, Li RM
    >>wrote:
    >>I'm not going to go out of my way to defend Palm here but it's worth
    >>pointing out that ACCESS, not Palm, is the company which actually owns
    >>the PalmOS.


    Just got a new device, and running Garnet on it -- so far, it seems to
    behave fairly well. I'm trying to restore and old Palm onto it.

    > Handspring had their **** together and made a good product - the Visor
    > and Visor Deluxe.


    Let me tell you -- I RUE the day I ditched my old Handspring Edge for a
    POC Palm T5. The T5 -- from buzzing screen, cant-run-a-browser, to flakey
    cable problems and power switches, has been a nightmare. A $300/whatever
    nightmare.

    > The bottom line for me is the T/X will probably be my last Palm OS
    > device. RIM is doing good things with the Blackberry and it appears
    > they will be writing Palm's obituary.


    Don't say that -- I've had my Nokia N810 for a week, and downloaded the
    Garnet emulator. Working out some sync junk (which is more of a crappy
    Gnome issue than anything else), and getting a _tiny_ bit of support for
    Datebook6 on their mailing list. I'm sorry I chunked out a couple of
    bills for Mapopolis (since my ear-piece jack is dying), but hoping I can
    figure out how to reuse their maps ...

    Ditching the T5 for the Nokia was the smartest thing I've done in years --
    I just need a PDA now (not much on the Nokia for contacts, email,
    calendar, etc etc). But it is _real_ nice to have something that
    communicates easily ....


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