my story -- Lexar SD card - Palmtop

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  1. my story -- Lexar SD card

    My no-name SD card failed, so I went to the shop to get a brand-name
    card. I learnt from the junk mail about a deal on the Lexar SD cards (A
    $25 for 1 GB) in the nearest store, so I went and got one.

    My camera (Pana LX1) requires at least 8Mb/s to record video (not that
    I especially needed; just nice to have it). However, I hoped to get
    away with a standard-speed card (I did not want to pay extra bucks for
    Ultra-type cards). My experience showed that SanDisk (and brand cards)
    released after around 2003 were in fact not 2 Mb/s, but 5 Mb/s cards
    (the latter corresponds to the writing speed 32x). And 5Mb/s was
    totally adequate for taking the pictures in burst.

    At the shop, I was presented with a bunch of the standard Lexar cards
    in identical packaging and with the 2006 year copyrights. However, the
    closer examination revealed that they had a subtle difference. Some of
    the packages had a sticker "Made in the USA" and the other had a
    sticker "Made in Taiwan". Well, for some reason I am picky and fuzzy
    about my cards, so I chose the one made in the US. (I thought it
    should be more advanced than the Taiwan card).

    The card turned out to be a 32x type card. I congratulated myself.
    That is really the maximum speed I would ever need. I did a search on
    the Internet, and found a confirmation that it was indeed a 32x card,
    http://www.aximsite.com/boards/showthread.php?t=70292 (posted in
    February 2005). The guys said that the Lexar cards of the type
    "A040507B" were the 32x cards, and that was the number my card had.
    The card felt rather quality-made. Not as good as the Panasonic card
    (which I could by for exactly the same price), but still it was fine.

    There was the only problem -- the plastic body of the card had a
    slight buckling, a manufacturing defect. I brought the card back to
    the shop, and exchanged it for another one (I was careful not to get a
    'Made in Taiwan" card. When I unpacked the card, I was slightly
    disappointed. The transparent pouch was made of a cheaper-quality
    plastic. The card itself felt as a less quality made. It looked like
    the manufacturer saved on making the contact pads (they looked more
    plain and cheaper). The plastic on the body had scuffs (or whatwever
    it is -- the the plastic squirts out of the form during molding). The
    number of the card was different, A041018B. I did a search, and a Rob
    Gailbrath webpage came out, http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/mul...?cid=6007-7905
    (updated in August 2006). He tested the Pro (60x) and Platinum (40x)
    Lexar cards, and they had the same type number !

    I gave a thought. The number of my new card was larger -- this
    probably meant that my new card was a later release (than the previous
    card). That was probably good -- they could improve the speed of the
    card, or even label the Platinum 40x card as a "standard" card.
    (Unfortunately, I cannot measure the card's speed right now.) The
    downside was that the card felt cheap. I reasoned that as the price of
    the cards fell, the manufacturer had to decrease the manufacturing
    expenses, and "cut the corners" in the newer cards design. I am still
    not sure that it was a good thing to buy the latest card (and not the
    previous version).

    So, guys, do you agree that the latest in SD cards -- not always the
    best ?


  2. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    On Sun, 22 Apr 2007 07:43:33 -0700, carrera d'olbani wrote:

    > My no-name SD card failed, so I went to the shop to get a brand-name
    > card. I learnt from the junk mail about a deal on the Lexar SD cards (A
    > $25 for 1 GB) in the nearest store, so I went and got one.
    >
    > My camera (Pana LX1) requires at least 8Mb/s to record video (not that
    > I especially needed; just nice to have it). However, I hoped to get
    > away with a standard-speed card (I did not want to pay extra bucks for
    > Ultra-type cards). My experience showed that SanDisk (and brand cards)
    > released after around 2003 were in fact not 2 Mb/s, but 5 Mb/s cards
    > (the latter corresponds to the writing speed 32x). And 5Mb/s was
    > totally adequate for taking the pictures in burst.
    >
    > At the shop, I was presented with a bunch of the standard Lexar cards
    > in identical packaging and with the 2006 year copyrights. However, the
    > closer examination revealed that they had a subtle difference. Some of
    > the packages had a sticker "Made in the USA" and the other had a
    > sticker "Made in Taiwan". Well, for some reason I am picky and fuzzy
    > about my cards, so I chose the one made in the US. (I thought it
    > should be more advanced than the Taiwan card).
    >
    > The card turned out to be a 32x type card. I congratulated myself.
    > That is really the maximum speed I would ever need. I did a search on
    > the Internet, and found a confirmation that it was indeed a 32x card,
    > http://www.aximsite.com/boards/showthread.php?t=70292 (posted in
    > February 2005). The guys said that the Lexar cards of the type
    > "A040507B" were the 32x cards, and that was the number my card had.
    > The card felt rather quality-made. Not as good as the Panasonic card
    > (which I could by for exactly the same price), but still it was fine.
    >
    > There was the only problem -- the plastic body of the card had a
    > slight buckling, a manufacturing defect. I brought the card back to
    > the shop, and exchanged it for another one (I was careful not to get a
    > 'Made in Taiwan" card. When I unpacked the card, I was slightly
    > disappointed. The transparent pouch was made of a cheaper-quality
    > plastic. The card itself felt as a less quality made. It looked like
    > the manufacturer saved on making the contact pads (they looked more
    > plain and cheaper). The plastic on the body had scuffs (or whatwever
    > it is -- the the plastic squirts out of the form during molding). The
    > number of the card was different, A041018B. I did a search, and a Rob
    > Gailbrath webpage came out, http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/mul...?cid=6007-7905
    > (updated in August 2006). He tested the Pro (60x) and Platinum (40x)
    > Lexar cards, and they had the same type number !
    >
    > I gave a thought. The number of my new card was larger -- this
    > probably meant that my new card was a later release (than the previous
    > card). That was probably good -- they could improve the speed of the
    > card, or even label the Platinum 40x card as a "standard" card.
    > (Unfortunately, I cannot measure the card's speed right now.) The
    > downside was that the card felt cheap. I reasoned that as the price of
    > the cards fell, the manufacturer had to decrease the manufacturing
    > expenses, and "cut the corners" in the newer cards design. I am still
    > not sure that it was a good thing to buy the latest card (and not the
    > previous version).
    >
    > So, guys, do you agree that the latest in SD cards -- not always the
    > best ?


    I simply buy the cheapest.


  3. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    At 22 Apr 2007 07:43:33 -0700 carrera d'olbani wrote:

    > So, guys, do you agree that the latest in SD cards -- not always the
    > best ?


    I'm not sure, but I do think you put way too much thought into buying a
    $20 SD card! ;-)

    I haven't had a CF or SD card fail on me in nearly five years, when I
    exchanged a 128MB Kingston CF, and I mix no-names, name-brands-
    whatever's on sale.




    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  4. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    How nice.



  5. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    carrera d'olbani wrote:
    > My no-name SD card failed, so I went to the shop to get a brand-name
    > card. I learnt from the junk mail about a deal on the Lexar SD cards
    > (A $25 for 1 GB) in the nearest store, so I went and got one.
    >
    > My camera (Pana LX1) requires at least 8Mb/s to record video (not that
    > I especially needed; just nice to have it). However, I hoped to get
    > away with a standard-speed card (I did not want to pay extra bucks for
    > Ultra-type cards). My experience showed that SanDisk (and brand cards)
    > released after around 2003 were in fact not 2 Mb/s, but 5 Mb/s cards
    > (the latter corresponds to the writing speed 32x). And 5Mb/s was
    > totally adequate for taking the pictures in burst.
    >
    > At the shop, I was presented with a bunch of the standard Lexar cards
    > in identical packaging and with the 2006 year copyrights. However, the
    > closer examination revealed that they had a subtle difference. Some of
    > the packages had a sticker "Made in the USA" and the other had a
    > sticker "Made in Taiwan". Well, for some reason I am picky and fuzzy
    > about my cards, so I chose the one made in the US. (I thought it
    > should be more advanced than the Taiwan card).
    >
    > The card turned out to be a 32x type card. I congratulated myself.
    > That is really the maximum speed I would ever need. I did a search on
    > the Internet, and found a confirmation that it was indeed a 32x card,
    > http://www.aximsite.com/boards/showthread.php?t=70292 (posted in
    > February 2005). The guys said that the Lexar cards of the type
    > "A040507B" were the 32x cards, and that was the number my card had.
    > The card felt rather quality-made. Not as good as the Panasonic card
    > (which I could by for exactly the same price), but still it was fine.
    >
    > There was the only problem -- the plastic body of the card had a
    > slight buckling, a manufacturing defect. I brought the card back to
    > the shop, and exchanged it for another one (I was careful not to get a
    > 'Made in Taiwan" card. When I unpacked the card, I was slightly
    > disappointed. The transparent pouch was made of a cheaper-quality
    > plastic. The card itself felt as a less quality made. It looked like
    > the manufacturer saved on making the contact pads (they looked more
    > plain and cheaper). The plastic on the body had scuffs (or whatwever
    > it is -- the the plastic squirts out of the form during molding). The
    > number of the card was different, A041018B. I did a search, and a Rob
    > Gailbrath webpage came out,
    > http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/mul...?cid=6007-7905
    > (updated in August 2006). He tested the Pro (60x) and Platinum (40x)
    > Lexar cards, and they had the same type number !
    >
    > I gave a thought. The number of my new card was larger -- this
    > probably meant that my new card was a later release (than the previous
    > card). That was probably good -- they could improve the speed of the
    > card, or even label the Platinum 40x card as a "standard" card.
    > (Unfortunately, I cannot measure the card's speed right now.) The
    > downside was that the card felt cheap. I reasoned that as the price of
    > the cards fell, the manufacturer had to decrease the manufacturing
    > expenses, and "cut the corners" in the newer cards design. I am still
    > not sure that it was a good thing to buy the latest card (and not the
    > previous version).
    >
    > So, guys, do you agree that the latest in SD cards -- not always the
    > best ?


    You typed 3265 characters...all about whether your $25 SD purchase was a
    good buy...
    Wow.


    --
    Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by MarkČ at:
    www.pbase.com/markuson



  6. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    On Apr 23, 2:23 pm, "MarkČ" here)@cox..net> wrote:
    > carrera d'olbani wrote:
    > > My no-name SD card failed, so I went to the shop to get a brand-name
    > > card. I learnt from the junk mail about a deal on the Lexar SD cards
    > > (A $25 for 1 GB) in the nearest store, so I went and got one.

    >
    > > My camera (Pana LX1) requires at least 8Mb/s to record video (not that
    > > I especially needed; just nice to have it). However, I hoped to get
    > > away with a standard-speed card (I did not want to pay extra bucks for
    > > Ultra-type cards). My experience showed that SanDisk (and brand cards)
    > > released after around 2003 were in fact not 2 Mb/s, but 5 Mb/s cards
    > > (the latter corresponds to the writing speed 32x). And 5Mb/s was
    > > totally adequate for taking the pictures in burst.

    >
    > > At the shop, I was presented with a bunch of the standard Lexar cards
    > > in identical packaging and with the 2006 year copyrights. However, the
    > > closer examination revealed that they had a subtle difference. Some of
    > > the packages had a sticker "Made in the USA" and the other had a
    > > sticker "Made in Taiwan". Well, for some reason I am picky and fuzzy
    > > about my cards, so I chose the one made in the US. (I thought it
    > > should be more advanced than the Taiwan card).

    >
    > > The card turned out to be a 32x type card. I congratulated myself.
    > > That is really the maximum speed I would ever need. I did a search on
    > > the Internet, and found a confirmation that it was indeed a 32x card,
    > >http://www.aximsite.com/boards/showt...t=70292(posted in
    > > February 2005). The guys said that the Lexar cards of the type
    > > "A040507B" were the 32x cards, and that was the number my card had.
    > > The card felt rather quality-made. Not as good as the Panasonic card
    > > (which I could by for exactly the same price), but still it was fine.

    >
    > > There was the only problem -- the plastic body of the card had a
    > > slight buckling, a manufacturing defect. I brought the card back to
    > > the shop, and exchanged it for another one (I was careful not to get a
    > > 'Made in Taiwan" card. When I unpacked the card, I was slightly
    > > disappointed. The transparent pouch was made of a cheaper-quality
    > > plastic. The card itself felt as a less quality made. It looked like
    > > the manufacturer saved on making the contact pads (they looked more
    > > plain and cheaper). The plastic on the body had scuffs (or whatwever
    > > it is -- the the plastic squirts out of the form during molding). The
    > > number of the card was different, A041018B. I did a search, and a Rob
    > > Gailbrath webpage came out,
    > >http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/mul...?cid=6007-7905
    > > (updated in August 2006). He tested the Pro (60x) and Platinum (40x)
    > > Lexar cards, and they had the same type number !

    >
    > > I gave a thought. The number of my new card was larger -- this
    > > probably meant that my new card was a later release (than the previous
    > > card). That was probably good -- they could improve the speed of the
    > > card, or even label the Platinum 40x card as a "standard" card.
    > > (Unfortunately, I cannot measure the card's speed right now.) The
    > > downside was that the card felt cheap. I reasoned that as the price of
    > > the cards fell, the manufacturer had to decrease the manufacturing
    > > expenses, and "cut the corners" in the newer cards design. I am still
    > > not sure that it was a good thing to buy the latest card (and not the
    > > previous version).

    >
    > > So, guys, do you agree that the latest in SD cards -- not always the
    > > best ?

    >
    > You typed 3265 characters...all about whether your $25 SD purchase was a
    > good buy...
    > Wow.
    >


    My needs are well served by one SD card only. If I get a card, I am
    stuck with it forever. It is like choosing a wife (with whom you are
    generally stuck for a long time). You want your wife to be perfect in
    this and that, and be a low-maintenance one at that. Those who have
    lots of SD cards, they are like those who see a number of prostitues
    at any given time. Understandably, that in this situation you won't
    worry about imprefections of any of your card.


  7. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card




    On 4/23/07 3:41 AM, in article
    1177317687.160734.129440@b75g2000hsg.googlegroups. com, "carrera d'olbani"
    wrote:

    > On Apr 23, 2:23 pm, "MarkČ" > here)@cox..net> wrote:
    >> carrera d'olbani wrote:
    >>> My no-name SD card failed, so I went to the shop to get a brand-name
    >>> card. I learnt from the junk mail about a deal on the Lexar SD cards
    >>> (A $25 for 1 GB) in the nearest store, so I went and got one.

    >>
    >>> My camera (Pana LX1) requires at least 8Mb/s to record video (not that
    >>> I especially needed; just nice to have it). However, I hoped to get
    >>> away with a standard-speed card (I did not want to pay extra bucks for
    >>> Ultra-type cards). My experience showed that SanDisk (and brand cards)
    >>> released after around 2003 were in fact not 2 Mb/s, but 5 Mb/s cards
    >>> (the latter corresponds to the writing speed 32x). And 5Mb/s was
    >>> totally adequate for taking the pictures in burst.

    >>
    >>> At the shop, I was presented with a bunch of the standard Lexar cards
    >>> in identical packaging and with the 2006 year copyrights. However, the
    >>> closer examination revealed that they had a subtle difference. Some of
    >>> the packages had a sticker "Made in the USA" and the other had a
    >>> sticker "Made in Taiwan". Well, for some reason I am picky and fuzzy
    >>> about my cards, so I chose the one made in the US. (I thought it
    >>> should be more advanced than the Taiwan card).

    >>
    >>> The card turned out to be a 32x type card. I congratulated myself.
    >>> That is really the maximum speed I would ever need. I did a search on
    >>> the Internet, and found a confirmation that it was indeed a 32x card,
    >>> http://www.aximsite.com/boards/showt...t=70292(posted in
    >>> February 2005). The guys said that the Lexar cards of the type
    >>> "A040507B" were the 32x cards, and that was the number my card had.
    >>> The card felt rather quality-made. Not as good as the Panasonic card
    >>> (which I could by for exactly the same price), but still it was fine.

    >>
    >>> There was the only problem -- the plastic body of the card had a
    >>> slight buckling, a manufacturing defect. I brought the card back to
    >>> the shop, and exchanged it for another one (I was careful not to get a
    >>> 'Made in Taiwan" card. When I unpacked the card, I was slightly
    >>> disappointed. The transparent pouch was made of a cheaper-quality
    >>> plastic. The card itself felt as a less quality made. It looked like
    >>> the manufacturer saved on making the contact pads (they looked more
    >>> plain and cheaper). The plastic on the body had scuffs (or whatwever
    >>> it is -- the the plastic squirts out of the form during molding). The
    >>> number of the card was different, A041018B. I did a search, and a Rob
    >>> Gailbrath webpage came out,
    >>> http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/mul...?cid=6007-7905
    >>> (updated in August 2006). He tested the Pro (60x) and Platinum (40x)
    >>> Lexar cards, and they had the same type number !

    >>
    >>> I gave a thought. The number of my new card was larger -- this
    >>> probably meant that my new card was a later release (than the previous
    >>> card). That was probably good -- they could improve the speed of the
    >>> card, or even label the Platinum 40x card as a "standard" card.
    >>> (Unfortunately, I cannot measure the card's speed right now.) The
    >>> downside was that the card felt cheap. I reasoned that as the price of
    >>> the cards fell, the manufacturer had to decrease the manufacturing
    >>> expenses, and "cut the corners" in the newer cards design. I am still
    >>> not sure that it was a good thing to buy the latest card (and not the
    >>> previous version).

    >>
    >>> So, guys, do you agree that the latest in SD cards -- not always the
    >>> best ?

    >>
    >> You typed 3265 characters...all about whether your $25 SD purchase was a
    >> good buy...
    >> Wow.
    >>

    >
    > My needs are well served by one SD card only. If I get a card, I am
    > stuck with it forever. It is like choosing a wife (with whom you are
    > generally stuck for a long time). You want your wife to be perfect in
    > this and that, and be a low-maintenance one at that. Those who have
    > lots of SD cards, they are like those who see a number of prostitues
    > at any given time. Understandably, that in this situation you won't
    > worry about imprefections of any of your card.
    >

    Since you seem to have an abundance of time, you probably won't need one of
    the faster cards, I would guess.

    In addition, If you think that a mate will be "low-maintenance", you WILL
    have a lot more free time...



    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
    ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---

  8. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    carrera d'olbani wrote:
    >
    > My needs are well served by one SD card only. If I get a card, I am
    > stuck with it forever. It is like choosing a wife (with whom you are
    > generally stuck for a long time). You want your wife to be perfect in
    > this and that, and be a low-maintenance one at that. Those who have
    > lots of SD cards, they are like those who see a number of prostitues
    > at any given time. Understandably, that in this situation you won't
    > worry about imprefections of any of your card.
    >



    I have never seen a response that compares a wife to a storage card, but
    this is where the comparison utterly fails - the wife's memory capacity
    far exceeds any card on the market, and will for no doubt an extremely
    long time...


  9. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    carrera d'olbani wrote:
    > On Apr 23, 2:23 pm, "MarkČ" > here)@cox..net> wrote:
    >> carrera d'olbani wrote:
    >>> My no-name SD card failed, so I went to the shop to get a brand-name
    >>> card. I learnt from the junk mail about a deal on the Lexar SD cards
    >>> (A $25 for 1 GB) in the nearest store, so I went and got one.

    >>
    >>> My camera (Pana LX1) requires at least 8Mb/s to record video (not
    >>> that I especially needed; just nice to have it). However, I hoped
    >>> to get away with a standard-speed card (I did not want to pay extra
    >>> bucks for Ultra-type cards). My experience showed that SanDisk (and
    >>> brand cards) released after around 2003 were in fact not 2 Mb/s,
    >>> but 5 Mb/s cards (the latter corresponds to the writing speed 32x).
    >>> And 5Mb/s was totally adequate for taking the pictures in burst.

    >>
    >>> At the shop, I was presented with a bunch of the standard Lexar
    >>> cards in identical packaging and with the 2006 year copyrights.
    >>> However, the closer examination revealed that they had a subtle
    >>> difference. Some of the packages had a sticker "Made in the USA"
    >>> and the other had a sticker "Made in Taiwan". Well, for some reason
    >>> I am picky and fuzzy about my cards, so I chose the one made in the
    >>> US. (I thought it should be more advanced than the Taiwan card).

    >>
    >>> The card turned out to be a 32x type card. I congratulated myself.
    >>> That is really the maximum speed I would ever need. I did a search
    >>> on the Internet, and found a confirmation that it was indeed a 32x
    >>> card, http://www.aximsite.com/boards/showt...t=70292(posted
    >>> in February 2005). The guys said that the Lexar cards of the type
    >>> "A040507B" were the 32x cards, and that was the number my card had.
    >>> The card felt rather quality-made. Not as good as the Panasonic card
    >>> (which I could by for exactly the same price), but still it was
    >>> fine.

    >>
    >>> There was the only problem -- the plastic body of the card had a
    >>> slight buckling, a manufacturing defect. I brought the card back to
    >>> the shop, and exchanged it for another one (I was careful not to
    >>> get a 'Made in Taiwan" card. When I unpacked the card, I was
    >>> slightly disappointed. The transparent pouch was made of a
    >>> cheaper-quality plastic. The card itself felt as a less quality
    >>> made. It looked like the manufacturer saved on making the contact
    >>> pads (they looked more plain and cheaper). The plastic on the body
    >>> had scuffs (or whatwever it is -- the the plastic squirts out of
    >>> the form during molding). The number of the card was different,
    >>> A041018B. I did a search, and a Rob Gailbrath webpage came out,
    >>> http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/mul...?cid=6007-7905
    >>> (updated in August 2006). He tested the Pro (60x) and Platinum (40x)
    >>> Lexar cards, and they had the same type number !

    >>
    >>> I gave a thought. The number of my new card was larger -- this
    >>> probably meant that my new card was a later release (than the
    >>> previous card). That was probably good -- they could improve the
    >>> speed of the card, or even label the Platinum 40x card as a
    >>> "standard" card. (Unfortunately, I cannot measure the card's speed
    >>> right now.) The downside was that the card felt cheap. I reasoned
    >>> that as the price of the cards fell, the manufacturer had to
    >>> decrease the manufacturing expenses, and "cut the corners" in the
    >>> newer cards design. I am still not sure that it was a good thing to
    >>> buy the latest card (and not the previous version).

    >>
    >>> So, guys, do you agree that the latest in SD cards -- not always the
    >>> best ?

    >>
    >> You typed 3265 characters...all about whether your $25 SD purchase
    >> was a good buy...
    >> Wow.
    >>

    >
    > My needs are well served by one SD card only. If I get a card, I am
    > stuck with it forever.


    ....Or until you spend another $25.

    > It is like choosing a wife (with whom you are
    > generally stuck for a long time). You want your wife to be perfect in
    > this and that, and be a low-maintenance one at that. Those who have
    > lots of SD cards, they are like those who see a number of prostitues
    > at any given time. Understandably, that in this situation you won't
    > worry about imprefections of any of your card.


    May I suggest that before you get married...you find a better analogy?

    --
    Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by MarkČ at:
    www.pbase.com/markuson



  10. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    At 23 Apr 2007 01:41:27 -0700 carrera d'olbani wrote:

    > My needs are well served by one SD card only. If I get a card, I am
    > stuck with it forever. It is like choosing a wife (with whom you are
    > generally stuck for a long time). You want your wife to be perfect in
    > this and that, and be a low-maintenance one at that.



    If changing wives would only cost us $25, we might be far less picky
    about them, as well... ;-)



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  11. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    In article ,
    xTennREMOVETHISPART@tds.net says...

    > I have never seen a response that compares a wife to a storage card, but
    > this is where the comparison utterly fails - the wife's memory capacity
    > far exceeds any card on the market, and will for no doubt an extremely
    > long time...
    >
    >


    Which brings to mind the comparison between a computer and a wife...

    - you only have to punch the information into a computer once

    - you don't really appreciate either of them until they go down on you

    - you can usually get a 3.25" floppy into a computer.

    Sorry - couldn't resist it

    --

    NightStalker

  12. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card




    On 4/23/07 3:37 PM, in article
    MPG.2097b60270ede6b7989846@news-europe.giganews.com, "NightStalker"
    wrote:

    > In article ,
    > xTennREMOVETHISPART@tds.net says...
    >
    >> I have never seen a response that compares a wife to a storage card, but
    >> this is where the comparison utterly fails - the wife's memory capacity
    >> far exceeds any card on the market, and will for no doubt an extremely
    >> long time...
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Which brings to mind the comparison between a computer and a wife...
    >
    > - you only have to punch the information into a computer once
    >
    > - you don't really appreciate either of them until they go down on you
    >
    > - you can usually get a 3.25" floppy into a computer.
    >
    > Sorry - couldn't resist it

    You need to write for Letterman.


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  13. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    In article ,
    ghost_topper@hotmail.com says...
    >
    > You need to write for Letterman.
    >
    >


    Heheh - a second career coming up you think? Unfortunately, I can't
    claim those as my originals, but I can't remember where I first heard
    them. They just kinda stuck! Don't know why....

    --

    NightStalker

  14. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    On Apr 22, 10:43 am, carrera d'olbani wrote:
    Lexar SD cards (A
    > $25 for 1 GB) in the nearest store, so I went and got one.


    I got a 1gb PNY for $9.99 from J&R in NYC.
    $19.99 for 2gb.


  15. Re: my story -- Lexar SD card

    At 25 Apr 2007 08:31:53 -0700 Mr.Bolshoyhuy wrote:

    > I got a 1gb PNY for $9.99 from J&R in NYC.


    Well, in keeping with the tone of this thread, that's literally
    a ten dollar whore! ;-)



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