Ah, Crud! RE: PdaNet, Sprint - Palmtop

This is a discussion on Ah, Crud! RE: PdaNet, Sprint - Palmtop ; I started using a Treo 300, liked it, saw a mention of PdaNet and thought "this is the bee's knees." So we got hold of Sprint, signed up for the Vision service, downloaded the PdaNet software and voila' were on ...

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Thread: Ah, Crud! RE: PdaNet, Sprint

  1. Ah, Crud! RE: PdaNet, Sprint

    I started using a Treo 300, liked it, saw a mention of PdaNet and thought
    "this is the bee's knees." So we got hold of Sprint, signed up for the
    Vision service, downloaded the PdaNet software and voila' were on the
    Internet via "wireless modem." $15 a month for Vision's *Unlimited* plan
    -- bye bye Earthlink.

    You've got to understand, we live in the boonies -- about as far from the
    Central Office as phone service will go. There is no DSL available, no
    cable, and the wireless "cable" company doesn't foresee offering their
    broadband internet service in this particular corner of the world any
    time soon. (1/2 a mile down the road, no problem.) So we get by with our
    26.4 mhz modem connection speed. Once I got it all the way up to 33.666!
    But 99.9% of the time we get 26.4.

    With PdaNet I get up to 145 mhz (I think it's mhz). Not our old house's
    cable internet speed but one heck of an improvement. Too good to be true?
    ....Yep. Turns out that SprintPCS is pretty clear in the fine print about
    not using their Vision Premium *unlimited* service with anything that can
    connect to a regular computer. &*^)*)(&!

    So now, edging a little bit away from the fine print... I know folks use
    their Treo's on Sprint's Vision plan as wireless modems. Their
    testimonials are up on PdaNet's site. Some seem to be doing with the
    "unofficial" blessing of their local Sprint reps who tell them that if
    they keep their usage below 150 Meg or (one person said) 200 Meg a month
    they might be able to get away with it. If I decided to slink around the
    fine print -- and I'm not saying I will, I'm still using a trial version
    of PdaNet and the Vision service is free for the first two months -- but
    *if* I decided to get stupid about the fine print (which no one
    instructed me to read) what does 150 meg mean? An hour a day (without
    downloads)? More? Less? What does "unlimited" mean, as in "unlimited
    Internet access?" Does this mean I could use my Treo 300 on the Vision
    service twenty-four hours a day, but if I hook it up to my laptop for 1
    hour a day I've used a lot more of the "unlimited" service?

    I'm honestly ignorant about this question of bandwidth. Does a computer
    use that much more bandwidth than the Treo? (I'm guessing it must.)

    (Sorry to ramble.)

    BTW, does anyone use an add-on keyboard with their Treo 300?

    --
    RonB
    "There's a story there...somewhere"

  2. Re: Ah, Crud! RE: PdaNet, Sprint

    I don't have the answer to your main question but I can help clarify
    some terminology.

    ***So we get by with our
    26.4 mhz modem connection speed. Once I got it all the way up to
    33.666!
    But 99.9% of the time we get 26.4.***

    The number 26.4 is not MHz but rather kilo bits per second (Kbps) MHz
    stands for mega-Hertz which means million Hertz. Hertz means literally
    "cycles per second". So one MHz is one million cycles per second. The
    maximum speed for telephone modem connections is 56Kbps which means 56
    thousand bits per second.

    ***Their
    testimonials are up on PdaNet's site. Some seem to be doing with the
    "unofficial" blessing of their local Sprint reps who tell them that if
    they keep their usage below 150 Meg or (one person said) 200 Meg a
    month ... ... what does 150 meg mean? ***

    In this case 150 meg means 150 megaBytes of data. It is not a measure
    of speed (speed is bandwidth) but rather it is a measure of a quantity
    of data, i.e. a number of bytes of data.


    ***I'm honestly ignorant about this question of bandwidth. Does a
    computer
    use that much more bandwidth than the Treo? (I'm guessing it must.) ***

    Again, "bandwidth" is a measure of speed or cycles per unit time, or
    quantity of data per unit time. The key here which the vast majority of
    computer people seem to miss is "PER UNIT OF TIME". For instance, if
    you have a very large file it does NOT require any particular amount of
    "bandwidth" to store that file or to upload or download that file. It
    would however take a wide bandwidth to transmit that file in a short
    amount of time. If you don't have a very wide (large) bandwidth then it
    will take longer. A 56Kbps modem has a wider bandwidth than a 28.8Kbps
    modem. A cable modem has an even larger bandwidth at perhaps 1.5Mbps
    (1.5 Million bits per second). Bandwidth always implies a quantity of
    something per unit time, not simply a quantity.


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